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Jeffrey A Taylor

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April 28, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal prosecutors dismissed a gun charge against an aide to Sen. Jim Webb (D-Va.). The aide, Phillip Thompson, 45, was arrested last month when he tried to enter a Capitol office building with a loaded handgun in his briefcase. Thompson had been charged with carrying a pistol without a license. U.S. Atty. Jeffrey A. Taylor said in a statement that there wasn't enough evidence to prove the charge. "Today's decision concludes the investigation of this incident," he said.
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NATIONAL
January 14, 2009 | David G. Savage
To Bradley Schlozman, they were "mold spores," "commies" and "crazy libs." He was referring to the career lawyers in the Justice Department's civil rights and voting rights divisions. From 2003 to 2006, Schlozman was a Bush appointee who supervised them. Along with several others, he came to symbolize the midlevel political appointees who brought a hard-edged ideology to the day-to-day workings of the Justice Department.
NATIONAL
August 9, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
Calling it "a most urgent public health and national security issue," two ranking lawmakers said Friday that they were expanding their congressional investigation into the risks associated with the nation's biodefense labs to focus on how someone as mentally unstable as accused anthrax killer Bruce E. Ivins could have worked unsupervised with deadly biological agents for so long. Reps. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.), chairman of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, and Bart Stupak (D-Mich.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department couldn't prosecute the man it believes was responsible for the anthrax attacks that spread fear across the nation in 2001. So on Wednesday, federal officials took the risky and virtually unprecedented step of trying their top-secret case in the court of public opinion. And though the verdict was mixed, many of those privy to mountains of new details released by federal authorities said they were convinced that the government had found the culprit in Bruce E.
NATIONAL
January 1, 2010 | By David G. Savage
A federal judge in Washington on Thursday dismissed criminal charges against five Blackwater security guards accused of killing 17 unarmed Iraqi civilians in an incident that strained U.S.-Iraqi relations and sparked an outcry over the military's use of private contractors. The judge did not rule on the substance of the charges against the security guards, but instead decided that prosecutors had wrongly relied on what the guards told State Department investigators shortly after the incident.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
For months, congressional investigators have been pursuing allegations that the Bush administration tried to influence cases handled by U.S. attorneys across the country in ways that would benefit the Republican Party. Now that investigation is near an impasse because the administration appears to be telling a U.S. attorney what to do. The prosecutor, Jeffrey A. Taylor, is the U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2007 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
As part of an inquiry into corporate payments to violent groups in Colombia, a group of congressmen wants more details about the Justice Department's handling of the Chiquita Brands International Inc. case, including whether the department was too lenient and why it took four years to file criminal charges after the banana company admitted making payoffs.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2008 | David Willman and David G. Savage, Times Staff Writers
In an extraordinary attempt to prove the guilt of a suspect now beyond their reach, government officials Wednesday released a wealth of new details about the troubled life of Bruce E. Ivins, and said they had evidence that would have convicted him in the 2001 anthrax mailings that killed five people. Hundreds of pages of previously secret documents show how the FBI, using new scientific tools, began to establish the guilt of one of the very scientists it had been relying on to crack the case.
NATIONAL
August 15, 2008 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
As federal authorities pursued the wrong suspect in the deadly anthrax mailings of 2001, they ignored or overlooked a series of early clues that pointed to Army scientist Bruce E. Ivins, a review of investigative records by the Los Angeles Times shows.
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