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Jeffrey Armstrong

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BUSINESS
October 4, 1988 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Oh ye technocrats of little faith. Ye computer nerds whose souls have been sold to the PC, and ye programmers whose hearts long only for the dots dancing across your terminals. Listen to the prayers of St. $ilicon, the self-anointed "fourth-quarter prophet" and founder of CHIP, the Church of Heuristic Information Processing, the world's first user-friendly religion.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge ruled Tuesday that California State University did not violate the state's open meeting law in January when it approved a $350,000 annual salary for the new president of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. In April, Lillian Taiz, president of the California Faculty Assn., sued the university's Board of Trustees and Cal State Chancellor Charles Reed, arguing that the public should have received prior notification that the salary for Jeffrey D. Armstrong would exceed the previous maximum rate of $328,212 for top executives by nearly $20,000.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge ruled Tuesday that California State University did not violate the state's open meeting law in January when it approved a $350,000 annual salary for the new president of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. In April, Lillian Taiz, president of the California Faculty Assn., sued the university's Board of Trustees and Cal State Chancellor Charles Reed, arguing that the public should have received prior notification that the salary for Jeffrey D. Armstrong would exceed the previous maximum rate of $328,212 for top executives by nearly $20,000.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1988 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Oh ye technocrats of little faith. Ye computer nerds whose souls have been sold to the PC, and ye programmers whose hearts long only for the dots dancing across your terminals. Listen to the prayers of St. $ilicon, the self-anointed "fourth-quarter prophet" and founder of CHIP, the Church of Heuristic Information Processing, the world's first user-friendly religion.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1988
Regarding the Oct. 4 story, "St. $ilicon--a Preacher for PC Fun-damentalism": I resent the "humor" of Jeffrey Armstrong, who attempts to use the fundamental and basic beliefs and prayers of all Christians to get a laugh (and, apparently, make a lot of money while so doing). I grew up with "The Lord's Prayer" as an expression of how I was to live each day in the belief that I had a hope for my ultimate life, that my will was to be subject to God's and that I should live each day so that my relationship with my fellow man would be pleasing in the sight of God. This prayer is even more meaningful to me now as an adult.
NEWS
March 22, 1987 | Associated Press
He calls himself St. Silicon, the patron saint of appropriate technology and founder of the first computer religion, C.H.I.P., the Church of Heuristic Information Processing. With a microchip glued to his forehead, he explains that his new religion is "user friendly" and that he is committed in his search for the "Divine Profits."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2005 | Jennifer Oldham, Times Staff Writer
It started Monday when their first plane blew a tire on takeoff, dumped fuel over the ocean and circled back to Los Angeles International Airport to land in a spray of sparks, shedding 200 pounds of rubber and metal on the runway. On Tuesday, hundreds of Air India passengers tried again, settling into a different jumbo jet with "Your Palace in the Sky" scrolled in red script near the tail. This time, one of the engines wouldn't start. For about five hours, travelers sat in the sweltering plane.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1988 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
An important rule of the invention business is that one can't be too shy about letting the world know about about one's better mousetrap. As it happens, Los Angeles inventor Clarence E. Smith isn't a very talkative fellow. So Smith brought along associate Roger Morgan to the second annual Invention Convention--which opened Thursday at the Pasadena Center--to explain the delicate subject of his labors.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2007 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
Quoting the pope and Roman Catholic teachings, the nation's largest animal-rights group has accused a Trappist monastery in South Carolina of raising hens for its egg business in an inhumane manner. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, or PETA -- which secretly videotaped the hens -- demanded Wednesday that the state attorney general and agricultural officials investigate Mepkin Abbey in Moncks Corner, S.C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
California State University is proposing to pay the new president of its San Diego campus $100,000 more annually than his predecessor, a move that is raising hackles as the university grapples with another round of student tuition hikes amid deep state funding cuts. If the plan is approved Tuesday by the Board of Trustees, San Diego State President Elliot Hirshman would receive annual compensation of $400,000 — $350,000 from the state and an annual supplement of $50,000 from the campus' nonprofit foundation.
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