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Jeffrey B Lane

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BUSINESS
November 30, 1989 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Battered by market weakness and its own blunders, Shearson Lehman Hutton announced Wednesday a reorganization that will demote Jeffrey B. Lane, the investment firm's current president and chief operating officer, and elevate a cadre of younger executives. The regrouping apparently makes Richard S. Fuld, 43, the leading candidate to eventually become Shearson's next president.
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BUSINESS
November 30, 1989 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Battered by market weakness and its own blunders, Shearson Lehman Hutton announced Wednesday a reorganization that will demote Jeffrey B. Lane, the investment firm's current president and chief operating officer, and elevate a cadre of younger executives. The regrouping apparently makes Richard S. Fuld, 43, the leading candidate to eventually become Shearson's next president.
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BUSINESS
January 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
Jeffrey B. Lane, recently removed as president and chief operating officer of Shearson Lehman Hutton Inc., has resigned from the securities firm, the company acknowledged today. The departure of the 47-year-old Lane, effective Dec. 29, caps a major shake-up at the company that has included the reshuffling of management and a $900-million recapitalization plan. Lane, who had been Shearson's No.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1990 | Staff and Wire Reports
Jeffrey B. Lane, recently removed as president and chief operating officer of Shearson Lehman Hutton Inc., has resigned from the securities firm. Lane said he left because he was no longer effective as a result of a realignment of the firm's senior management. "If you're not happy and not enthusiastic, you can't be effective," Lane said, explaining why he left Shearson after 20 years with the brokerage. Before the shake-up in November, Lane had been the No.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1986
The American Stock Exchange nominating committee has nominated five new candidates to three-year terms on its board of governors. Nominees, to be voted on at the Amex's annual election on April 14, are: Abraham Krasnoff, vice chairman and chief executive Pall Corp.; Burton G. Malkiel, dean, Yale School of Organization and Management; Richard G. Rosenthal, former managing director and member of the executive committee, Salomon Bros.; Jeffrey B.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Shearson Lehman Hutton Inc. announced today a corporate realignment and management reshuffle that included the reassignment of company president Jeffrey B. Lane to a lesser position. The move reflected the continuing turmoil at the nation's second-largest investment firm, which over the last month has announced hundreds of layoffs and a sharp reduction in stockbroker commissions. Peter A.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1987
Jeffrey B. Lane, 44, has been named president of the Wall Street investment firm Shearson Lehman Bros. Inc., it was announced Wednesday. Lane, who had been a vice chairman at the firm, will continue as Shearson's chief operating officer, the company said in a statement. The position of president had been vacant. Shearson also announced that four executives heading the company's operating divisions have been named chairmen of their respective areas.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
Arthur Levitt Jr. said Thursday that he was resigning as chairman of the American Stock Exchange after 11 years at the nation's third-largest stock market, which has attempted to stem the loss of business to its bigger Wall Street peers by expanding into innovative securities. Levitt, 58, said he would remain at the exchange until a successor is named, and that a search committee had been formed. He said he plans to build his 3-year-old Levitt Communications Inc. into a larger publishing company.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1989 | DAVID A. VISE, THE WASHINGTON POST
New York Stock Exchange Chairman John J. Phelan Jr. said Tuesday that the stock market could be destroyed unless steps are taken to limit the wild swings in share prices that have the investment world in an uproar. "A lot of people think it is a New York Stock Exchange issue," Phelan said in an interview. "It is a national issue; liquidity in all markets and volatility in all markets.
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
In its most important reform since the stock market collapse, the Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday approved an experimental program that is supposed to provide temporary relief for investors when stock prices head into a wild fall. The commission, acting on the eve of the first anniversary of Black Monday, approved a one-year test of "circuit breakers" that would halt trading in all stocks on all U.S.
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