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Jeffrey C Eglash

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1999 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assistant U.S. Atty. Jeffrey C. Eglash, a prosecutor specializing in public corruption and government fraud cases, was selected Friday by the Los Angeles Police Commission as its next inspector general. Eglash, 38, brings a strong investigative and prosecutorial background to the civilian watchdog position, commissioners said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2001 | MATT LAIT and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks on Tuesday dismissed as blatantly false a report by the LAPD's civilian watchdog that concluded the chief sought to withhold information from county prosecutors investigating the Rampart corruption scandal. Parks, swarmed by reporters after a meeting of the Los Angeles Police Commission, also denied findings by Inspector General Jeffrey C.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1999 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sweeping reaffirmation of the importance of civilian oversight of the Los Angeles Police Department, the city attorney today will tell the city's Police Commission that it has complete authority to order the chief to cooperate with the inspector general on all matters. The issue has been a point of contention in recent months between commission members and Chief Bernard C.
NEWS
March 6, 2001 | SCOTT GLOVER and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Police Department sought to bypass county prosecutors handling the Rampart corruption probe, even as Chief Bernard C. Parks assured the public that his detectives were cooperating with them, according to a confidential report by the Police Commission's inspector general. Inspector General Jeffrey C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2001 | MATT LAIT and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks on Tuesday dismissed as blatantly false a report by the LAPD's civilian watchdog that concluded the chief sought to withhold information from county prosecutors investigating the Rampart corruption scandal. Parks, swarmed by reporters after a meeting of the Los Angeles Police Commission, also denied findings by Inspector General Jeffrey C.
NEWS
March 6, 2001 | SCOTT GLOVER and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Police Department sought to bypass county prosecutors handling the Rampart corruption probe, even as Chief Bernard C. Parks assured the public that his detectives were cooperating with them, according to a confidential report by the Police Commission's inspector general. Inspector General Jeffrey C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2000 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Department remains a secretive, closed-off fraternity, resistant to outsiders and capable of seducing its civilian bosses into taking its side rather than upholding their oversight duties, the department's chief watchdog told a group of attorneys Thursday. In fact, LAPD Inspector General Jeffrey C. Eglash said, he often is not entirely sure if he has the support of the five-member police commission to which he must answer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1999 | MATT LAIT and BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Exacerbating the controversy over the role of the inspector general, the Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday instructed Chief Bernard C. Parks not to distribute a special order on how officers are to cooperate with the civilian watchdog. Police Commission members say they are concerned that the language in the chief's directive may limit the inspector general's ability to scrutinize the department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1999 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renewing a controversy that consumed the Los Angeles Police Commission's first civilian watchdog, Inspector Gen. Jeffrey C. Eglash said Tuesday that LAPD officials are attempting to restrict the scope and authority of his job. Eglash, a former assistant U.S. attorney, said he has significant differences of opinion with Chief Bernard C. Parks over his access to department records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2000 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Department's civilian watchdog strongly objected Monday to a Police Commission proposal that he contends would substantially reduce his authority and transform his office into an agent of the department's Internal Affairs Division. In a three-page memo to his five civilian bosses, Inspector General Jeffrey C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2000 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Department's civilian watchdog strongly objected Monday to a Police Commission proposal that he contends would substantially reduce his authority and transform his office into an agent of the department's Internal Affairs Division. In a three-page memo to his five civilian bosses, Inspector General Jeffrey C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2000 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Police Department remains a secretive, closed-off fraternity, resistant to outsiders and capable of seducing its civilian bosses into taking its side rather than upholding their oversight duties, the department's chief watchdog told a group of attorneys Thursday. In fact, LAPD Inspector General Jeffrey C. Eglash said, he often is not entirely sure if he has the support of the five-member police commission to which he must answer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1999 | MATT LAIT and BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Exacerbating the controversy over the role of the inspector general, the Los Angeles Police Commission on Tuesday instructed Chief Bernard C. Parks not to distribute a special order on how officers are to cooperate with the civilian watchdog. Police Commission members say they are concerned that the language in the chief's directive may limit the inspector general's ability to scrutinize the department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1999 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sweeping reaffirmation of the importance of civilian oversight of the Los Angeles Police Department, the city attorney today will tell the city's Police Commission that it has complete authority to order the chief to cooperate with the inspector general on all matters. The issue has been a point of contention in recent months between commission members and Chief Bernard C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1999 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renewing a controversy that consumed the Los Angeles Police Commission's first civilian watchdog, Inspector Gen. Jeffrey C. Eglash said Tuesday that LAPD officials are attempting to restrict the scope and authority of his job. Eglash, a former assistant U.S. attorney, said he has significant differences of opinion with Chief Bernard C. Parks over his access to department records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1999 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assistant U.S. Atty. Jeffrey C. Eglash, a prosecutor specializing in public corruption and government fraud cases, was selected Friday by the Los Angeles Police Commission as its next inspector general. Eglash, 38, brings a strong investigative and prosecutorial background to the civilian watchdog position, commissioners said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1990
A Rolling Hills plastic surgeon faces eight years in prison and half a million dollars in fines after pleading guilty this week in federal court to tax evasion. Dr. Lawrence A. Saks, 39, faces sentencing Dec. 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1989
A man identified by authorities as a top lieutenant for the Grape Street Crips street gang was convicted Wednesday in Los Angeles on narcotics charges and faces a mandatory prison sentence of at least 20 years. Dion Floyd, 27, who federal prosecutors said was supervising narcotics operations in St. Louis for the gang, was convicted of one count of conspiracy and one count each of distributing cocaine and rock cocaine. Assistant U.S. Atty. Jeffrey C.
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