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Jeffrey Chanin

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BUSINESS
March 10, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the often-nasty negotiating battles that rage in bankruptcy court, investment banker Jeffrey Chanin comes across as someone who can hold his ground. He's big, about 300 pounds on a 6-foot frame. He talks tough, with a deep, gravelly voice. And Chanin also is shrewd, a military history buff and product of working-class Brooklyn and Harvard Law School. "He knows how to move people," said Craig Cogut, a Century City lawyer and investment banker. Chanin, he added, "is a bulldog."
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BUSINESS
March 12, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the often-nasty negotiating battles that rage in bankruptcy court, investment banker Jeffrey Chanin comes across as someone who can hold his ground. He's big, about 300 pounds on a 6-foot frame. He talks tough, with a deep, gravelly voice. And Chanin also is shrewd, a military history buff and product of working-class Brooklyn and Harvard Law School. "He knows how to move people," said Craig Cogut, a Century City lawyer and investment banker. Chanin, he added, "is a bulldog."
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BUSINESS
March 12, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the often-nasty negotiating battles that rage in bankruptcy court, investment banker Jeffrey Chanin comes across as someone who can hold his ground. He's big, about 300 pounds on a 6-foot frame. He talks tough, with a deep, gravelly voice. And Chanin also is shrewd, a military history buff and product of working-class Brooklyn and Harvard Law School. "He knows how to move people," said Craig Cogut, a Century City lawyer and investment banker. Chanin, he added, "is a bulldog."
BUSINESS
March 10, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the often-nasty negotiating battles that rage in bankruptcy court, investment banker Jeffrey Chanin comes across as someone who can hold his ground. He's big, about 300 pounds on a 6-foot frame. He talks tough, with a deep, gravelly voice. And Chanin also is shrewd, a military history buff and product of working-class Brooklyn and Harvard Law School. "He knows how to move people," said Craig Cogut, a Century City lawyer and investment banker. Chanin, he added, "is a bulldog."
BUSINESS
January 5, 1994 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Going after a company that's under bankruptcy court protection--as Federated Department Stores is doing with R.H. Macy & Co.--isn't buying on the cheap. Experts say it's a complicated and costly way of doing a takeover, merger or acquisition, and one with significant risks. Yet, merger and bankruptcy experts alike predict a steady and increasing stream of such acquisitions, including takeovers that appear at first blush to be unwanted--as in the Macy-Federated situation--or downright hostile.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chicago partnership offering to invest up to $270 million in Carter Hawley Hale Stores is pushing for a stake of as much as 90% of the retailer in exchange for the financial aid, one of the heads of the investment group said Thursday. But Sam Zell, co-founder of the Zell/Chilmark Fund, said he would expect to retain Carter Hawley's current top management if his partnership's offer succeeds.
NEWS
March 17, 1995 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their latest gambit to ease an intensifying cash crunch, Orange County officials on Thursday laid out a proposal to unilaterally extend for one year--at existing interest rates--$1.275 billion in short-term county and school debt due this summer. But representatives of bondholder groups quickly disputed the need for the so-called rollover and predicted that without the promise of a higher interest payout, the proposal almost certainly would be rejected by most bondholders.
NEWS
March 17, 1995 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their latest gambit to ease an intensifying cash crunch, Orange County officials Thursday laid out a proposal to unilaterally extend for one year--at existing interest rates--$1.275 billion in short-term county and school debt due this summer. But representatives of bondholder groups disputed the need for the so-called rollover and said that without the promise of a higher interest payout the proposal almost certainly would be rejected by most bondholders.
NEWS
January 28, 1995 | MARK PLATTE and JODI WILGOREN and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In yet another shocking disclosure of apparent irregularities in Orange County's collapsed investment pool, officials announced Friday that former Treasurer Robert L. Citron's office shifted at least $140 million in county losses into pool accounts held largely by other public agencies. The discovery--which prompted acting Treasurer Thomas E.
NEWS
February 3, 1995 | TRACY WEBER and REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Six days after filing for bankruptcy in December, Orange County seized $73 million in restricted money due county bondholders and--perhaps illegally--placed it in the county's own depleted general fund, the California state auditor said Thursday. State Auditor Kurt R. Sjoberg, whose office is reviewing the county's books at the request of Gov. Pete Wilson, also questioned whether an additional $209 million was improperly transferred into the general fund from other county funds.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1985 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
When Sandy Sigoloff attended the recent opening of the Treasury of San Marco exhibit at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, he was suffering from jet lag after a business trip. So the chairman and chief executive of Wickes Cos. decided to head for the bar and order a Perrier. As he approached, the bartender gasped, "Oh, my God, he is really here!" "I looked around," Sigoloff recalled, "but he was talking about me." Wherever Sanford C. Sigoloff goes these days, he gets recognized.
NEWS
January 13, 1992 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vince Punaro took a major gamble in 1988 when he put his small Los Angeles trucking company into Chapter 11 bankruptcy in hopes of straightening out its tangled business affairs. Now, deep in debt, he is trying to start a new career at age 62. A&B Transportation Services, his old firm, is out of business; its trucks have been sold at auction. Instead of helping, the bankruptcy filing hurt business and hastened his company's demise, Punaro said.
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