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OPINION
September 26, 1999 | Sergio Munoz, Sergio Munoz is an editorial writer for The Times
Being U.S. ambassador to Mexico has never been easy. The size and complexity of the bilateral agenda can be truly overwhelming: Intricate trade and immigration regulations, as well as drug-trafficking standoffs, are some of the difficult issues involved. The cultural, political and economic differences between countries can appear impossible to manage. On the Mexican side, history also plays a role in how the U.S. ambassador is perceived.
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NATIONAL
November 13, 2002 | From Associated Press
The Senate confirmed Antonio Garza Jr., a close friend of President Bush, to be U.S. ambassador to Mexico on Tuesday. The confirmation came without dissent on the first day of the Senate's lame-duck session. Garza succeeds Jeffrey Davidow, who is leaving Mexico after four years. Garza currently serves on the Texas Railroad Commission, which oversees the state's oil and gas industry. His election as a commissioner in 1998 made him the first Latino Republican elected to statewide office in Texas.
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NEWS
April 29, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeffrey Davidow, a professional diplomat with 29 years of experience at the State Department, was selected Tuesday by President Clinton to be U.S. ambassador to Mexico, filling a key post that has been vacant for 10 months. Davidow, currently assistant secretary of State for Latin America, has good relations on Capitol Hill, probably assuring his early confirmation by the Senate. Clinton's first choice for the post, former Massachusetts Gov. William F.
NEWS
February 26, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government issued a formal protest Friday after the U.S. ambassador to Mexico described the country as one of the world's main headquarters for drug traffickers--a comment that kicked up a storm of angry criticism by politicians and newspapers. "The contempt for Mexico is obvious," the Mexico City newspaper Cronica declared in its editorial Friday.
NEWS
May 2, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Returning from Latin America aboard Secretary of State Madeleine Albright's plane at night recently, a department press aide wrestled with questions from reporters about U.S. legislation on Caribbean tariffs. The aide admitted that he knew little about it. "Well, get Davidow," an exasperated reporter said. "He's probably sleeping," the aide said. "Then wake him." In moments, the aide returned with Jeffrey Davidow, assistant secretary of State for Latin American affairs.
NEWS
January 6, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Clinton administration has apparently picked veteran diplomat Jeffrey Davidow, assistant secretary of state for Latin America, as ambassador to Mexico, senior administration officials said. Davidow has been ambassador to Venezuela and Zambia. President Clinton's first pick for the job was ex-Massachusetts Gov. William F. Weld, whose nomination was blocked last year by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.).
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
After more than a year, Mexico is finally getting a new U.S. ambassador. The Senate approved, by voice vote and without debate, career diplomat Jeffrey Davidow to be ambassador to Mexico. He is expected to take his post in early July. Administration officials have said there is no foreign relationship more important than Mexico, given the array of cross-border issues, including trade, narcotics trafficking and migration problems.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2002 | From Associated Press
The Senate confirmed Antonio Garza Jr., a close friend of President Bush, to be U.S. ambassador to Mexico on Tuesday. The confirmation came without dissent on the first day of the Senate's lame-duck session. Garza succeeds Jeffrey Davidow, who is leaving Mexico after four years. Garza currently serves on the Texas Railroad Commission, which oversees the state's oil and gas industry. His election as a commissioner in 1998 made him the first Latino Republican elected to statewide office in Texas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1998
The U.S. Embassy in Mexico City has been leaderless for more than a year now. In that time, relations between the two countries have deteriorated to an abysmal level. That might have been prevented had Washington installed a first-class ambassador, one who could work through bilateral problems and tone down political rhetoric. Now, at long last, the Senate has confirmed the Clinton administration's choice for the post, Jeffrey Davidow, undersecretary of State for inter-American affairs.
NEWS
February 26, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government issued a formal protest Friday after the U.S. ambassador to Mexico described the country as one of the world's main headquarters for drug traffickers--a comment that kicked up a storm of angry criticism by politicians and newspapers. "The contempt for Mexico is obvious," the Mexico City newspaper Cronica declared in its editorial Friday.
OPINION
September 26, 1999 | Sergio Munoz, Sergio Munoz is an editorial writer for The Times
Being U.S. ambassador to Mexico has never been easy. The size and complexity of the bilateral agenda can be truly overwhelming: Intricate trade and immigration regulations, as well as drug-trafficking standoffs, are some of the difficult issues involved. The cultural, political and economic differences between countries can appear impossible to manage. On the Mexican side, history also plays a role in how the U.S. ambassador is perceived.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1998
The U.S. Embassy in Mexico City has been leaderless for more than a year now. In that time, relations between the two countries have deteriorated to an abysmal level. That might have been prevented had Washington installed a first-class ambassador, one who could work through bilateral problems and tone down political rhetoric. Now, at long last, the Senate has confirmed the Clinton administration's choice for the post, Jeffrey Davidow, undersecretary of State for inter-American affairs.
NEWS
June 28, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
After more than a year, Mexico is finally getting a new U.S. ambassador. The Senate approved, by voice vote and without debate, career diplomat Jeffrey Davidow to be ambassador to Mexico. He is expected to take his post in early July. Administration officials have said there is no foreign relationship more important than Mexico, given the array of cross-border issues, including trade, narcotics trafficking and migration problems.
NEWS
May 2, 1998 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Returning from Latin America aboard Secretary of State Madeleine Albright's plane at night recently, a department press aide wrestled with questions from reporters about U.S. legislation on Caribbean tariffs. The aide admitted that he knew little about it. "Well, get Davidow," an exasperated reporter said. "He's probably sleeping," the aide said. "Then wake him." In moments, the aide returned with Jeffrey Davidow, assistant secretary of State for Latin American affairs.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeffrey Davidow, a professional diplomat with 29 years of experience at the State Department, was selected Tuesday by President Clinton to be U.S. ambassador to Mexico, filling a key post that has been vacant for 10 months. Davidow, currently assistant secretary of State for Latin America, has good relations on Capitol Hill, probably assuring his early confirmation by the Senate. Clinton's first choice for the post, former Massachusetts Gov. William F.
NEWS
January 6, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Clinton administration has apparently picked veteran diplomat Jeffrey Davidow, assistant secretary of state for Latin America, as ambassador to Mexico, senior administration officials said. Davidow has been ambassador to Venezuela and Zambia. President Clinton's first pick for the job was ex-Massachusetts Gov. William F. Weld, whose nomination was blocked last year by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.).
NEWS
August 30, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Embassy announced that Mexicans are expected to get 60,000 temporary U.S. work visas in the coming fiscal year under existing programs, a 22% increase over this year's number. The announcement by Ambassador Jeffrey Davidow caused a bit of confusion, coming one week before President Vicente Fox is to visit Washington to put the final touches on a much more ambitious temporary visa program for Mexican migrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1998
Newport Beach skipper Scott McClung, released from custody in Mexico last month, on Wednesday flew to Mexico City to meet with officials to discuss his arrest and detention. McClung, 36, was taken into custody Aug. 10 in Cozumel, a resort island on the Yucatan Peninsula, on charges of violating Mexican weapons laws when authorities found two AR-15 semiautomatic rifles and three shotguns on his $4.5-million boat, the Rapture. The charges were later dismissed.
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