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Jeffrey Eglash

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1999 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks on Thursday invited the Police Commission's civilian watchdog to review all aspects of the police shooting of a mentally ill homeless woman. "I am committed to providing the inspector general with complete access to all of the related investigative material," Parks said in prepared statement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1999 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks on Thursday invited the Police Commission's civilian watchdog to review all aspects of the police shooting of a mentally ill homeless woman. "I am committed to providing the inspector general with complete access to all of the related investigative material," Parks said in prepared statement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1999 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renewing a controversy that consumed the Los Angeles Police Commission's first civilian watchdog, Inspector Gen. Jeffrey C. Eglash said Tuesday that LAPD officials are attempting to restrict the scope and authority of his job. Eglash, a former assistant U.S. attorney, said he has significant differences of opinion with Chief Bernard C. Parks over his access to department records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1999 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renewing a controversy that consumed the Los Angeles Police Commission's first civilian watchdog, Inspector Gen. Jeffrey C. Eglash said Tuesday that LAPD officials are attempting to restrict the scope and authority of his job. Eglash, a former assistant U.S. attorney, said he has significant differences of opinion with Chief Bernard C. Parks over his access to department records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2000
Re "D.A. Letters Detail Alleged Rebuffs by Police," March 22: The Times published details of "confidential documents" written by district attorney prosecutors alleging lack of LAPD cooperation in the Rampart scandal. You reported, "The five letters, filed under seal because they refer to specific cases under investigation" were obtained by The Times. Unless your reporters stole the documents, somebody leaked "confidential documents." Hmm, let me see. The LAPD? I don't think so. Inspector General Jeffrey Eglash?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1997
A federal judge Friday ordered a Pasadena woman and her son detained on charges they submitted phony tax returns seeking $305,000 in illegal refunds, a federal prosecutor said. U.S. Magistrate Judge James McMahon found that Dorothy Mae Woods, 55, dubbed the "Welfare Queen" during a case in the 1980s, and her son Bernard Palmer, 37, of Duarte, posed a flight risk and an economic danger, Assistant U.S. Atty. Jeffrey Eglash said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1996
A Los Angeles man and woman were indicted Thursday by a federal grand jury for allegedly trying to bribe an IRS agent in an effort to get her to reduce the amount of back taxes their businesses owed. James J. Oh, 62, and Marie Song, 37, were charged with conspiracy, bribery of an Internal Revenue Service agent and obstruction of an IRS audit, according to court papers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2001
Re "D.A. Finds No Fault With Police Chief on Rampart," March 8: In the face of overwhelming evidence, it is disappointing that Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley has sided with beleaguered LAPD Chief Bernard Parks. On one hand, Cooley says that he, as the chief county law enforcement officer, is charged with investigating police corruption. On the other, he rationalizes Parks' actions by applauding the fact that key information went only to federal prosecutors. On top of all this, he questions the authority of Police Commission Inspector General Jeffrey Eglash, the only official with enough guts to exhaustively investigate the chief's actions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1988
Two Gardena meat wholesalers were indicted Friday by a federal grand jury on charges that they secretly added chicken gizzards to their hamburger meat and passed off the mixture as pure beef. Gerald Tully, 53, president of Tully Premium Meats Inc., and John Bero, 45, vice president of the firm, face up to three years in prison and $300,000 in fines if convicted of the conspiracy and the sale of adulterated and misbranded foods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1988
A Marina del Rey man was convicted Wednesday in Los Angeles federal court of laundering $500,000 for an arm of a Colombian cocaine cartel. Heroel Hernandez, a computer software executive, was one of many people indicted in five cities last year in "Operation Cash Web," a nationwide FBI sweep targeting drug money launderers. His conviction completes prosecutions against nine people who were arrested after their indictments in Los Angeles. Four others were never caught.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1990
A Rolling Hills plastic surgeon faces eight years in prison and half a million dollars in fines after pleading guilty this week in federal court to tax evasion. Dr. Lawrence A. Saks, 39, faces sentencing Dec. 3.
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