Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJeffrey Eugenides
IN THE NEWS

Jeffrey Eugenides

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
September 1, 2002 | JEFF TURRENTINE, Jeff Turrentine is an essayist and critic whose articles have appeared in Book Review, The New York Times Magazine, Slate.com and other publications.
Myths, whether ancient or modern, are basically designed to take the vexing mysteries of the universe and reformulate them as stories that make human sense. Jeffrey Eugenides has only two books to his name; nevertheless, he's well on his way to becoming a spectacular mythologist, attacking some of our most enduring riddles with heroic energy, keen wit and genuine compassion.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2011
BOOKS In "The Marriage Plot," Jeffrey Eugenides' first novel since 2002's Pulitzer Prize–winning "Middlesex," he examines the lives of three college seniors at Brown University in the '80s. The three characters — Madeleine, an incurable romantic; Leonard, a brilliant but unstable philosopher, and Mitchell, a clear-eyed religious-studies student — find themselves enveloped in a love triangle of sorts that loops in enigmatic professors, feminist theorists, neo-Victorians and concerned mothers.
Advertisement
BOOKS
June 20, 1993 | Kristin McCloy, McCloy is the author of "Velocity" and has just completed her second novel, "Some Girls," which will be published next year
In the hands of someone else, the story of five teen-age girls, all from the same family, taking their own lives might be a dreadful tale, dark and depressing. But despite the ghoulish nature of his subject, or perhaps because of it, Jeffrey Eugenides never loses his sense of humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
The Marriage Plot A Novel Jeffrey Eugenides Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 406 pp., $28 For a while there, it looked like the novel was a goner. This was after the French theorist invasion, when the ideas of Lacan and Derrida caught fire with American academics, turning the study of English inside out. Language was slippery, its meaning elusive, narrative old-fashioned, they said; the straightforward march of an imagined story across a page was a sham. In the early 1980s, Charles Dickens was out; Donald Barthelme was in. This is the world in which Madeleine wakes up, hungover, on her graduation day in Jeffrey Eugenides' new novel, "The Marriage Plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2011
BOOKS In "The Marriage Plot," Jeffrey Eugenides' first novel since 2002's Pulitzer Prize–winning "Middlesex," he examines the lives of three college seniors at Brown University in the '80s. The three characters — Madeleine, an incurable romantic; Leonard, a brilliant but unstable philosopher, and Mitchell, a clear-eyed religious-studies student — find themselves enveloped in a love triangle of sorts that loops in enigmatic professors, feminist theorists, neo-Victorians and concerned mothers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
The Marriage Plot A Novel Jeffrey Eugenides Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 406 pp., $28 For a while there, it looked like the novel was a goner. This was after the French theorist invasion, when the ideas of Lacan and Derrida caught fire with American academics, turning the study of English inside out. Language was slippery, its meaning elusive, narrative old-fashioned, they said; the straightforward march of an imagined story across a page was a sham. In the early 1980s, Charles Dickens was out; Donald Barthelme was in. This is the world in which Madeleine wakes up, hungover, on her graduation day in Jeffrey Eugenides' new novel, "The Marriage Plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2003 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
The Italian suit that Jeffrey Eugenides plans to wear for a reading at UCLA may be lost. All of Eugenides' luggage, which left with him from Berlin, where he has lived for a decade, may be lost. But he doesn't seem that worried. He's not complaining. After listening to fellow writers Martin Amis and Philip Roth complaining about the horrors of book tours at a party last year, he knows the terrible sound of writers whining about the bad food, the hotels and the planes.
BOOKS
January 13, 2008 | Louisa Thomas, Louisa Thomas has written for the Washington Post and the New York Times Book Review.
What makes a love story? The answer found in "My Mistress's Sparrow Is Dead," an anthology of short stories edited by Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Jeffrey Eugenides, may surprise. The thread that binds these 27 disparate tales -- spanning 120 years -- is loneliness. Love here doesn't join people together. More often than not it cracks them apart. The objects of love can take many forms: the beloveds who don't love their lovers in return.
NEWS
October 12, 1986
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has selected two UCLA students to receive the first Don and Gee Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting. The fellowships, which provide each winner with $20,000 in living expenses during the fellowship year, were awarded to Allison Anders and Dennis Clontz of UCLA and Jeffrey Eugenides of Stanford University.
BOOKS
June 24, 2007
Fiction 1. The Road by Cormac McCarthy ($14.95) 2. Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides ($15) 3. Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen ($13.95) 4. Suite Francaise by Irene Nemirovsky ($14.95) 5. The Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai ($14) Nonfiction 1. Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert ($15) 2. Blink by Malcolm Gladwell ($15.99) 3. The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls ($14) 4. The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion ($13.95) 5. 1,000 Places to See Before You Die by Patricia Schultz ($19.
BOOKS
January 13, 2008 | Louisa Thomas, Louisa Thomas has written for the Washington Post and the New York Times Book Review.
What makes a love story? The answer found in "My Mistress's Sparrow Is Dead," an anthology of short stories edited by Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Jeffrey Eugenides, may surprise. The thread that binds these 27 disparate tales -- spanning 120 years -- is loneliness. Love here doesn't join people together. More often than not it cracks them apart. The objects of love can take many forms: the beloveds who don't love their lovers in return.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2003 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
The Italian suit that Jeffrey Eugenides plans to wear for a reading at UCLA may be lost. All of Eugenides' luggage, which left with him from Berlin, where he has lived for a decade, may be lost. But he doesn't seem that worried. He's not complaining. After listening to fellow writers Martin Amis and Philip Roth complaining about the horrors of book tours at a party last year, he knows the terrible sound of writers whining about the bad food, the hotels and the planes.
BOOKS
September 1, 2002 | JEFF TURRENTINE, Jeff Turrentine is an essayist and critic whose articles have appeared in Book Review, The New York Times Magazine, Slate.com and other publications.
Myths, whether ancient or modern, are basically designed to take the vexing mysteries of the universe and reformulate them as stories that make human sense. Jeffrey Eugenides has only two books to his name; nevertheless, he's well on his way to becoming a spectacular mythologist, attacking some of our most enduring riddles with heroic energy, keen wit and genuine compassion.
BOOKS
June 20, 1993 | Kristin McCloy, McCloy is the author of "Velocity" and has just completed her second novel, "Some Girls," which will be published next year
In the hands of someone else, the story of five teen-age girls, all from the same family, taking their own lives might be a dreadful tale, dark and depressing. But despite the ghoulish nature of his subject, or perhaps because of it, Jeffrey Eugenides never loses his sense of humor.
BOOKS
July 22, 2007
1. Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen ($13.95) 2. The Road by Cormac McCarthy ($14.95) 3. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini ($16) Fiction 4. The Emperor's Children by Claire Messud ($14.95) 5. Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides ($15) Nonfiction 1. Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert ($15) 2. The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls ($14) 3. The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz ($12.95) 4. Blink by Malcolm Gladwell ($15.99) 5. The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion ($13.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|