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December 5, 2004 | David Feige is a public defender and a Soros Justice Media Fellow in New York. "Indefensible," his book about the criminal justice system, will be published by Little, Brown in 2005.
It is a beautiful day in Seattle--warm, sunny, clear--the kind of day locals would rather not tell the world about. Across from the bustle of the Pike Place Market, Jeffrey Fisher stops at a farm stand for fingerling potatoes and fresh asparagus. "Here you go, Mr. Fisher," says a mop-topped twentysomething as he hands over the credit card receipt. As Fisher takes the pen, the clerk blurts out: "Hey, man, are you the guy winning all those Supreme Court cases?"
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MAGAZINE
December 5, 2004 | David Feige is a public defender and a Soros Justice Media Fellow in New York. "Indefensible," his book about the criminal justice system, will be published by Little, Brown in 2005.
It is a beautiful day in Seattle--warm, sunny, clear--the kind of day locals would rather not tell the world about. Across from the bustle of the Pike Place Market, Jeffrey Fisher stops at a farm stand for fingerling potatoes and fresh asparagus. "Here you go, Mr. Fisher," says a mop-topped twentysomething as he hands over the credit card receipt. As Fisher takes the pen, the clerk blurts out: "Hey, man, are you the guy winning all those Supreme Court cases?"
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BUSINESS
March 12, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Charter Communications Inc. announced Tuesday, just as the firm's chief financial officer announced his resignation, that outside parties have asked about investing in the company. Potential investors approached controlling shareholder Paul Allen, the cable and telephone service provider said in a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing. Allen, who co-founded Microsoft Corp., gave the investors information about Charter that has not been publicly released, according to the filing, which didn't indicate how much the parties might invest.
MAGAZINE
January 2, 2005
It was just thrilling to read the profile on Jeffrey Fisher by criminal defense attorney David Feige ("The Supreme Beginner," Dec. 5). Fisher's perfecta at the Supreme Court will have profound effects. The Crawford vs. Washington decision severely limits any statements made to police officers or therapists from coming into evidence. The decision has already destroyed decades of progress made in efforts to fight domestic violence and sexual child abuse. Prosecutors, women's advocates and legislators spent years crafting laws to spare these particularly vulnerable victims from further victimization at the hands of defense attorneys and the legal system.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Defendants in criminal cases have a constitutional right to a competent lawyer's advice when deciding whether to accept a plea bargain, the Supreme Court ruled, providing a significant expansion of rights that could have a broad impact on the justice system. "Ours for the most part is a system of pleas, not a system of trials," Justice Anthony M. Kennedy said for the majority in a pair of 5-4 decisions. Noting that about 97% of federal convictions and 94% of state convictions result from guilty pleas, Kennedy wrote that "in today's criminal justice system, the negotiation of a plea bargain, rather than the unfolding of a trial, is almost always the critical point for the defendant.
NATIONAL
November 26, 2012 | By David Savage
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court has let stand the murder conviction of a paranoid and delusional Idaho man who was denied the opportunity to mount an insanity defense. Three justices dissented, arguing that the court should incorporate the long-standing insanity defense into the Constitution. Shortly after John Hinckley Jr. was acquitted of the attempted assassination of President Reagan by reason of insanity in 1982, Idaho and three other states abolished the insanity defense from their criminal laws.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court's new champion of the 4th Amendment, is likely to play a crucial role Tuesday when the court hears this year's most important search case: whether the police may routinely examine the digital contents of a cellphone confiscated during an arrest. Civil libertarians say the stakes are high because arrests are so common - 13.1 million were made in 2010, according to the FBI - and smartphones hold so much private information. Under current law, officers may search a person under arrest, checking pockets and looking through a wallet or purse.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2009 | David G. Savage
The Supreme Court announced Thursday a potentially significant change in how crime lab reports are used in trials, ruling that a defendant has the right to cross-examine in front of the jury the experts who prepared these reports. Crime labs have been subjected to criticism in the last decade, much of it because of DNA evidence that has shown at least 240 prisoners were in fact not guilty.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court agreed Friday to decide whether the 1st Amendment prohibits Congress from requiring that groups receiving funds to fight HIV and AIDS across the globe have a policy "opposing prostitution. " The case, to be heard in the spring, is the latest test of how far the government can go to regulate a group's speech as a condition of receiving public funds. Since 2008, Congress has authorized the spending of $48 billion to combat HIV, AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis, and lawmakers have insisted this global effort include an attack on prostitution and sex trafficking.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2004 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court made it harder Monday for prosecutors and the police to use out-of-court statements against a criminal defendant at his trial. In a 7-2 opinion, the justices said the Constitution gives defendants the right to confront their accusers in court, a right that cannot be whittled away by allowing statements whenever a witness is unavailable.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- A 2009 police search of a Los Angeles gang member's home will be examined Wednesday by the Supreme Court in a case that could further define Americans' 4th Amendment protections. The case of Walter Fernandez vs. California is the latest requiring the court to determine when police may enter and look around a home without a search warrant.    At issue is whether a consent to search provided by one resident of a private home is enough to override an objection from a spouse or roommate, if the objecting party is not present.
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