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Jeffrey Goddard

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BUSINESS
October 8, 1990 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it comes to bridging East and West, Jeff Goddard is a tireless middleman. In 1978, the Glendale native pitched the Mormon faith in Japan, learning that nation's language and culture through door-to-door encounters in southern Honshu and on Shikoku island. In 1983, he joined the Tokyo office of advertising giant Ogilvy & Mather and persuaded the Japanese to eat more Sunkist oranges, use more Exxon oil and wear Lee jeans.
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BUSINESS
October 8, 1990 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it comes to bridging East and West, Jeff Goddard is a tireless middleman. In 1978, the Glendale native pitched the Mormon faith in Japan, learning that nation's language and culture through door-to-door encounters in southern Honshu and on Shikoku island. In 1983, he joined the Tokyo office of advertising giant Ogilvy & Mather and persuaded the Japanese to eat more Sunkist oranges, use more Exxon oil and wear Lee jeans.
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BUSINESS
March 5, 1997 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California entrepreneur Jeffrey Goddard is exporting water, in a manner of speaking. His Studio City-based TVA, the Video Agency, is marketing multimedia water shows to theme park operators around the world, particularly Asia. He calls it a dive-in, a high-tech show projected onto water screens. Viewers can watch from the edge of the pool or even enjoy the theatrics as they float on inner tubes.
NEWS
May 9, 1989 | Robert A. Jones
The man who is selling California to the Japanese can be found in Van Nuys. His name is Jeffrey Goddard and he works, for the time being, out of a dusty ranchette deep in the Valley. Goddard's neighborhood is not a place you would normally associate with real estate on a geopolitical scale. Big dogs snooze beneath RVs. Orange trees drop their fruit unnoticed, the owners long bored with the novelty of citrus in the front yard. This is old Valley, the smokey flats that never grew into Encino.
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