Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJeffrey Goodby
IN THE NEWS

Jeffrey Goodby

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
May 5, 1996 | Warren Berger, Warren Berger's last piece for the magazine was on Discovery Channel founder John Hendricks
It began, as things often do in advertising, with a betrayal. Joanna Hughes Brach, who oversees advertising for Polaroid, the Cambridge, Mass.-based photographic company, was almost out the door for a maternity leave last summer when she received a phone call. Her New York advertising agency, BBDO, informed her that it was ditching Polaroid just as the company was planning to start its biggest campaign in decades. To make matters worse, BBDO was pursuing archrival Kodak.
ARTICLES BY DATE
MAGAZINE
May 5, 1996 | Warren Berger, Warren Berger's last piece for the magazine was on Discovery Channel founder John Hendricks
It began, as things often do in advertising, with a betrayal. Joanna Hughes Brach, who oversees advertising for Polaroid, the Cambridge, Mass.-based photographic company, was almost out the door for a maternity leave last summer when she received a phone call. Her New York advertising agency, BBDO, informed her that it was ditching Polaroid just as the company was planning to start its biggest campaign in decades. To make matters worse, BBDO was pursuing archrival Kodak.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 14, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When the cutting-edge San Francisco ad agency Goodby, Berlin & Silverstein won the $25-million Carl's Jr. ad business last week, one West Coast fast-food industry executive joked: "I suppose ol' Carl Karcher will get on the air now and deck Ronald McDonald." Far from it. The ad agency's co-founder and creative head, Jeffrey Goodby, says Carl's Jr. commercials will now take great pains to show Carl's as a swell, folksy, family-run restaurant chain.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Madison Avenue's top commercial creations have historically been catchy entertainment vehicles like dancing raisins and drum-beating bunnies. But the talk of the ad world in 1994 probably won't be rhythmic raisins or invincible rabbits. Beleaguered advertisers--hankering for product sales--know that snappy images may bring smiles, but they don't always elicit sales. Brand-awareness campaigns can sometimes take years to show results.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When CBS--and initially NBC--refused to run L.A Gear's TV spot for its new sneaker last week, L.A. Gear figured that the best way to get even was to cry foul. "I got a bomb dropped on me by the networks," said Sandy Saemann, L.A. Gear executive vice president. "I had to find a way to maximize whatever was thrown at me." So, the sneaker maker shipped off biting press releases that lambasted the networks.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1998 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one remembers Joe Isuzu. (OK, we're lying.) American Isuzu Motors Inc. hasn't aired a commercial with its infamous lying salesman in eight years. Yet when consumers are asked about Isuzu, the fictitious Joe Isuzu invariably comes up. "We're probably best known as the 'father of Joe Isuzu,' " said Joseph L. Fellona, vice president for light-vehicle marketing at the U.S. arm of the Japanese auto maker.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1994 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
It's not just the "Love Boat" anymore. Here comes the Love Train--and other more sensual lures for travelers--courtesy of Madison Avenue. The usually conservative Amtrak has just unwrapped an unexpectedly flashy print ad campaign that poses the rather racy question "Can a Train Holiday Improve Your Love Life?" A train trip, the ad vows, "will send your love life into orbit."
BUSINESS
February 27, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Forget the baseball owners. Forget the players. Forget the peanut vendors. Consider, instead, anyone whose unfortunate job it is to promote major league baseball. Consider them frazzled. On Monday, talks between the owners--who have locked players out of spring training--and the Major League Players Assn. unraveled faster than a cheap sweater.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Faster than you can fill your gas tank, Saddam Hussein has become the overriding influence on nightly newscasts. Now he is also starting to influence the ad world. Iraq-bashing ads or ads referring to the Middle East crisis haven't aired on any grand scale yet. But advertising executives say they're inevitable. And if the Persian Gulf crisis continues, executives say, look for a veritable about-face in the general upbeat tone of American advertising.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|