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Jeffrey Hatcher

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1996 | Janice Arkatov, Janice Arkatov is a regular contributor to Calendar
Jeffrey Hatcher sees nothing unusual about his interest in funerals. "I've found that most playwrights, at some time, want to write about funerals or funeral parlors," insists the 38-year-old Minneapolis-based writer, whose treatise on the subject, the funeral parlor-set "Three Viewings," opened Friday on South Coast Repertory's Second Stage after a run last year at the Manhattan Theatre Club.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012 | By Margaret Gray
Childhood alienation may be painful, but it can be mined later for entertaining anecdotes. In a new comedy, “Mrs. Mannerly,” receiving its West Coast premiere at Theatre 40, playwright Jeffrey Hatcher dramatizes his experience as a misfit boy in Steubenville, Ohio. Nine-year-old Jeffrey (Richard Horvitz) is sent to an etiquette class taught by Mrs. Mannerly (Nan Tepper), a local legend who, although nearing obsolescence in 1967, doggedly preaches proper posture and table setting.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
In "Three Viewings," Jeffrey Hatcher's new play at South Coast Repertory, three unrelated characters deliver monologues in a funeral parlor. If this sounds like an exercise in Playwriting 101, you're not far off the mark. The plots of each of these three playlets are as neatly wrapped up as a gift package prepared by an anal-compulsive. That's the bad news. There's plenty of good news in this sprightly 90-minute evening as well. In writing character, Hatcher is well into the advanced seminar.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2002 | IRENE LACHER
Jeffrey Hatcher is your basic Midwesterner, but you wouldn't know that to hear him speak. "I have the same splintered syntax as most Americans," he says, "but I do prefer a level of articulation, rhetorical flourish, even baroque phrasing on occasion. It's a little old-fashioned."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012 | By Margaret Gray
Childhood alienation may be painful, but it can be mined later for entertaining anecdotes. In a new comedy, “Mrs. Mannerly,” receiving its West Coast premiere at Theatre 40, playwright Jeffrey Hatcher dramatizes his experience as a misfit boy in Steubenville, Ohio. Nine-year-old Jeffrey (Richard Horvitz) is sent to an etiquette class taught by Mrs. Mannerly (Nan Tepper), a local legend who, although nearing obsolescence in 1967, doggedly preaches proper posture and table setting.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
A young woman in turn-of-the-century clothing is rescued from a contemporary iceberg in the North Atlantic. The setting is the present. The only word she utters is "Titanic." Could she be an authentic survivor? Playwright Jeffrey Hatcher weaves this riddle into "Scotland Road," a play having its West Coast premiere at the Pacific Resident Theatre in Venice. Aspiring to be a nouveau Jack Finney time-warp adventure, "Scotland Road" is actually a mess.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
A young woman in turn-of-the-century clothing is rescued from a contemporary iceberg in the North Atlantic. The setting is the present. The only word she utters is "Titanic." Could she be an authentic survivor? Playwright Jeffrey Hatcher weaves this riddle into "Scotland Road," a play having its West Coast premiere at the Pacific Resident Theatre in Venice. Aspiring to be a nouveau Jack Finney time-warp adventure, "Scotland Road" is actually a mess.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2002 | IRENE LACHER
Jeffrey Hatcher is your basic Midwesterner, but you wouldn't know that to hear him speak. "I have the same splintered syntax as most Americans," he says, "but I do prefer a level of articulation, rhetorical flourish, even baroque phrasing on occasion. It's a little old-fashioned."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1997
Playwright Jeffrey Hatcher will lead the A.S.K. free playwriting lab April 16 from 7 to 10 p.m., at 11845 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. Hatcher will focus on the three rules that govern adaptation: the dramatic question, the theatrical question and the question of fidelity to the original. Enrollment is by lottery two weeks before the class. Information and reservation: (310) 478-9ASK.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1995 | JAN HERMAN
Cocktails, Liaisons and More: The Vanguard Theatre Ensemble in Fullerton will launch its 1996 season Jan. 5 with "The Cocktail Hour" by A.R. Gurney. The season, the troupe's fifth, will continue with "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" by Christopher Hampton (opens March 1), "Holiday" by Philip Barry (opens June 27), "Rhinoceros" by Eugene Ionesco (opens Aug. 23) and "The Fifth of July" by Lanford Wilson (opens Oct. 18). Subscriptions: $48 to $62. Information: (714) 526-8007.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
A young woman in turn-of-the-century clothing is rescued from a contemporary iceberg in the North Atlantic. The setting is the present. The only word she utters is "Titanic." Could she be an authentic survivor? Playwright Jeffrey Hatcher weaves this riddle into "Scotland Road," a play having its West Coast premiere at the Pacific Resident Theatre in Venice. Aspiring to be a nouveau Jack Finney time-warp adventure, "Scotland Road" is actually a mess.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
A young woman in turn-of-the-century clothing is rescued from a contemporary iceberg in the North Atlantic. The setting is the present. The only word she utters is "Titanic." Could she be an authentic survivor? Playwright Jeffrey Hatcher weaves this riddle into "Scotland Road," a play having its West Coast premiere at the Pacific Resident Theatre in Venice. Aspiring to be a nouveau Jack Finney time-warp adventure, "Scotland Road" is actually a mess.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
In "Three Viewings," Jeffrey Hatcher's new play at South Coast Repertory, three unrelated characters deliver monologues in a funeral parlor. If this sounds like an exercise in Playwriting 101, you're not far off the mark. The plots of each of these three playlets are as neatly wrapped up as a gift package prepared by an anal-compulsive. That's the bad news. There's plenty of good news in this sprightly 90-minute evening as well. In writing character, Hatcher is well into the advanced seminar.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1996 | Janice Arkatov, Janice Arkatov is a regular contributor to Calendar
Jeffrey Hatcher sees nothing unusual about his interest in funerals. "I've found that most playwrights, at some time, want to write about funerals or funeral parlors," insists the 38-year-old Minneapolis-based writer, whose treatise on the subject, the funeral parlor-set "Three Viewings," opened Friday on South Coast Repertory's Second Stage after a run last year at the Manhattan Theatre Club.
NEWS
June 22, 2006 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
THE recent Broadway drama "Rabbit Hole" in its West Coast premiere, a 2006 Olivier Award-winning comedy from London and a new one-woman show written by and starring Carrie Fisher are among the eclectic offerings in the Geffen Playhouse's 2006-07 season. The season opener will be "Rabbit Hole," David Lindsay-Abaire's exploration of a couple's roller-coaster ride through loss (Sept. 13-Oct. 22).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By David Ng
Dámaso Rodriguez -- a familiar presence in the Southern California theater scene for his work at the Pasadena Playhouse and the Furious Theatre Company -- has been named the new artistic director of the Artists Repertory Theatre in Portland, Ore. His appointment begins in January, the company said. Rodriguez, 38, will step down from his current position as co-artistic director of the Furious and will move to the hipster capital for the new job. Rodriguez called the job "a good fit for me" because Artists Repertory does the kind of adventurous new work he put on at the Furious.
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