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Jeffrey K Skilling

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BUSINESS
April 21, 2006 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
During his eight pivotal days on the witness stand, it became clear that nobody could control Jeffrey K. Skilling -- sometimes not even Skilling himself. Daniel M. Petrocelli, Skilling's urbane and witty lead defense lawyer, has joked several times that even if he'd written a script for Skilling's testimony, it wouldn't have worked because his headstrong client is "absolutely un-rehearsable." Under both friendly examination by Petrocelli and antagonistic grilling by prosecutor Sean M.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2013 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
Former Enron Chief Executive Jeffrey K. Skilling, who is serving a 24-year prison sentence for his part in the collapse of the energy giant, could win an early release under a possible deal with the Justice Department. Skilling was convicted in 2006 on 19 counts - including insider trading, conspiracy and securities fraud - and has served six years. During that time, his attorneys have tried several times to overturn his conviction. The Justice Department posted a notice on its website Thursday to notify victims of the Enron fraud and bankruptcy that prosecutors may resentence Skilling.
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BUSINESS
August 15, 2001 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeffrey K. Skilling stunned the energy industry by abruptly resigning Tuesday as chief executive of energy-trading giant Enron Corp., barely six months into a job for which he'd been groomed for years. Skilling's departure follows a series of setbacks for Enron, including seeing its huge investment in the fiber-optic telecommunications sector turn sour and facing accusations of electricity price-gouging in California. The company's stock price has lost half its value this year.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2011 | Reuters
SAN FRANCISCO - The criminal convictions of former Enron Corp Chief Executive Jeffrey Skilling were upheld by a U.S. appeals court. A jury convicted Skilling in 2006 on 19 counts, including conspiracy and securities fraud, in connection with the collapse of the one-time energy trading giant. But the U.S. Supreme Court later invalidated one theory underpinning the conspiracy conviction. On Wednesday the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals found that any error committed by the trial judge was "harmless," and thus upheld the conviction.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2005
The U.S. agreed to former Enron Corp. Chief Executive Jeffrey K. Skilling's request for a September trial, though the timing remains in question because neither his codefendants nor the judge has settled on a date.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Former Enron Chief Executive Jeffrey K. Skilling has asked a federal judge to overturn his guilty verdict based on an August decision that reversed four other Enron-related convictions. Skilling is seeking dismissal of the guilty counts or a new trial in light of a federal appeals court ruling in New Orleans that Merrill Lynch employees accused of assisting Enron in defrauding investors were doing what Enron wanted them to do and did not profit at its expense.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2004 | From Associated Press
Attorneys in the case against Jeffrey K. Skilling, Enron Corp.'s former chief executive, reportedly received $23 million for his defense before the government froze the assets of the highest-ranking former company executive indicted so far in the scandal, according to court filings. Experts were surprised at the hefty legal fees that were paid before a federal judge froze about $55 million of Skilling's assets.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Former Enron Corp. executives Kenneth L. Lay, Jeffrey K. Skilling and Richard A. Causey will stand trial for securities fraud in Houston federal court, a judge ruled, denying a request to move the case. U.S. District Judge Sim Lake rejected a defense request for a change of venue based on claims that potential jurors in Houston, the location of the energy trading company's headquarters, would be biased against them, said Skilling's attorney Dan Petrocelli.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Federal prosecutors may drop some charges in the fraud case against former Enron Corp. executives Kenneth L. Lay and Jeffrey K. Skilling, who are scheduled to go on trial Jan. 30. The government, in a letter to defense lawyers, said it wanted to drop four wire fraud charges against Skilling stemming from actions of former Chief Accounting Officer Richard A. Causey, a defendant until he pleaded guilty last month.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Federal prosecutors want Jeffrey K. Skilling, the convicted former chief executive of Enron Corp., to pay the full $182.8 million in criminal proceeds he and late Enron founder Kenneth L. Lay obtained by defrauding shareholders. Lay, convicted in May of securities fraud with Skilling, died of a heart attack July 5, before he could exhaust his appeals. As a result, his conviction and forfeiture requirements will be dismissed. The government had sought $43.5 million from Lay and $139.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Imprisoned former Enron Chief Executive Jeffrey K. Skilling asked Friday for a new trial, saying the Justice Department used incorrect legal theories and "coercive and abusive tactics" to win a conviction, including threatening witnesses. Skilling was sentenced in October to more than 24 years in prison for his role in the collapse of Enron Corp. He was convicted along with founder Kenneth L. Lay in May 2006, on 19 counts of fraud, conspiracy, insider trading and lying to auditors.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Former Enron Corp. Chief Executive Jeffrey K. Skilling entered prison quietly Wednesday, the final step in the fall of a man who presided over one of Wall Street's biggest success stories. Skilling embraced his wife before walking into the low-security Federal Correctional Institution here to begin his 24-year, four-month sentence for fraud and other crimes at the energy giant.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Kenneth L. Lay's death wiped away his convictions. Andrew S. Fastow got a reduced six-year sentence. That leaves former Chief Executive Jeffrey K. Skilling as the sole top Enron Corp. executive who could be given at least 20 years in prison when he is sentenced today for helping orchestrate the biggest corporate scandal in U.S. history.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Former Enron Chief Executive Jeffrey K. Skilling has asked a federal judge to overturn his guilty verdict based on an August decision that reversed four other Enron-related convictions. Skilling is seeking dismissal of the guilty counts or a new trial in light of a federal appeals court ruling in New Orleans that Merrill Lynch employees accused of assisting Enron in defrauding investors were doing what Enron wanted them to do and did not profit at its expense.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Federal prosecutors want Jeffrey K. Skilling, the convicted former chief executive of Enron Corp., to pay the full $182.8 million in criminal proceeds he and late Enron founder Kenneth L. Lay obtained by defrauding shareholders. Lay, convicted in May of securities fraud with Skilling, died of a heart attack July 5, before he could exhaust his appeals. As a result, his conviction and forfeiture requirements will be dismissed. The government had sought $43.5 million from Lay and $139.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Two of the most notorious felons to emerge from Enron Corp.'s rubble -- Jeffrey K. Skilling and Andrew S. Fastow -- could hear firsthand at their sentencing hearings how their crimes affected the people who lost money and jobs when the company crashed. A federal judge ruled recently that victims who attend Fastow's Sept. 26 hearing can sign in and speak. Such statements, U.S. District Judge Kenneth Hoyt ruled, "will continue until completed" and Fastow must be there to listen.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
Jeffrey K. Skilling, former chief executive of Enron Corp., was ordered to leave a courtroom where five former executives of the company's broadband division are on trial. The fraud trial in U.S. District Court in Houston was halted until Skilling, who may be called as a witness, could be removed under a rule that bars prospective witnesses from hearing other testimony in a trial.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2011 | Reuters
SAN FRANCISCO - The criminal convictions of former Enron Corp Chief Executive Jeffrey Skilling were upheld by a U.S. appeals court. A jury convicted Skilling in 2006 on 19 counts, including conspiracy and securities fraud, in connection with the collapse of the one-time energy trading giant. But the U.S. Supreme Court later invalidated one theory underpinning the conspiracy conviction. On Wednesday the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals found that any error committed by the trial judge was "harmless," and thus upheld the conviction.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Enron Corp. Chief Executive Jeffrey Skilling says he contemplated suicide after his company crumbled and authorities began to ratchet up legal pressure on him. "I've come to the conclusion that life is better than the alternative, which was not a conclusion that was real clear to me for a period of time," Skilling told the Wall Street Journal.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2006 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
Kenneth L. Lay was in no hurry to update his Internet site Friday. The home page, with its red, white and blue piping and its formal portrait of the disgraced Enron Corp. founder, remained a digital time capsule of the moment when the verdict was still pending, when Lay could still spit defiance at the government's attacks on his character, when he could still write: "We firmly believe that the jury will see through this."
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