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Jeffrey Kahane

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April 23, 2014 | By David Ng
Following a 20-year run, conductor Jeffrey Kahane will step down from his position as music director of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra at the conclusion of the 2016-17 season, the group announced on Wednesday. Kahane will be named music director laureate at the end of his tenure, which will be the longest of any music director in the ensemble's history. No successor has been announced. Leaders said that the board of directors will be launching a search to find a new music director.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2014 | By Rick Schultz
There was a sense of occasion at the Alex Theater in Glendale on Saturday night when Jeffrey Kahane led the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra in works by Hannah Lash, Chopin and Haydn. The day before, Kahane announced he would be leaving his post after the 2016-17 season, making his run as music director an even 20 years, the longest in the ensemble's history. The farewells began after intermission when the orchestra's executive director, Rachel Fine, announced that at the end of his tenure he would be named the orchestra's first conductor laureate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2012 | By Richard S. Ginell
For their last 2012 program in Glendale's Alex Theatre Saturday night, Jeffrey Kahane and the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra needed no soloists other than Kahane himself. The program was three-fourths American -   Gershwin, Copland and John Adams - with one Czech interloper, Dvorák, who came to America well after the included Serenade for Winds, Op. 44 was written. It easily could have been an all-American program -  there's a universe of superb chamber-orchestra pieces to choose from -  but as it emerged, one could sense some interlocking of gears that made the evening a unified whole.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By David Ng
Following a 20-year run, conductor Jeffrey Kahane will step down from his position as music director of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra at the conclusion of the 2016-17 season, the group announced on Wednesday. Kahane will be named music director laureate at the end of his tenure, which will be the longest of any music director in the ensemble's history. No successor has been announced. Leaders said that the board of directors will be launching a search to find a new music director.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2014 | By Rick Schultz
There was a sense of occasion at the Alex Theater in Glendale on Saturday night when Jeffrey Kahane led the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra in works by Hannah Lash, Chopin and Haydn. The day before, Kahane announced he would be leaving his post after the 2016-17 season, making his run as music director an even 20 years, the longest in the ensemble's history. The farewells began after intermission when the orchestra's executive director, Rachel Fine, announced that at the end of his tenure he would be named the orchestra's first conductor laureate.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By Chloe Veltman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
— When Jeffrey Kahane decided to undertake a survey of Mozart's mature piano concertos to celebrate the composer's 250th birthday, he didn't expect to play all 23 of the works himself. But when scheduling conflicts made hiring other leading soloists impractical, the pianist and music director of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra decided to take on the feat on his own. "I didn't think of it as a huge project about me, so I wasn't daunted," the musician said at his home in Sonoma's wine country.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1988 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Attracting an audience that has heard him progress before its very own ears, pianist Jeffrey Kahane moved yet another step up the ladder to excellence Saturday at Royce Hall, UCLA. This time the native Angeleno played with an altogether remarkable boldness and authority, qualities that may not always have been in evidence before. From the opening, Mendelssohn's "Variations Seriuses," he stamped out a profile that remained nearly throughout.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1995 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
In the ongoing saga of Nights at the Hollywood Bowl, Thursday's venture, before 8,005 officially tabulated listeners, was probably not among the most significant chapters. Call it modestly enjoyable. Continuing the story from Tuesday, we find Jeffrey Tate still injured, this time replaced by Jahja Ling, resident conductor of the Cleveland Orchestra and former fellow of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Institute. (Ling, you may remember, stepped in last Bowl season, when Carlo Rizzi failed to show.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
A sense of festivity often colors the atmosphere when the Chamber Music Society of the Los Angeles Philharmonic appears at its Westside headquarters, Gindi Auditorium at the University of Judaism. That happened again, Monday, when the chamber players hosted pianist Jeffrey Kahane, fresh from his latest local concerts, last week at the Music Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1991 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Normally, pianist Jeffrey Kahane can be found playing and occasionally conducting Mozart piano concertos in front of a full orchestra. But when he hits the stage of the Irvine Barclay Theatre on Friday night, Kahane might wonder just for a second: "Where did everybody go?" Following a tradition actually sanctioned by Mozart, Kahane, the Angeles String Quartet and bassist Nico Abondolo will perform a stripped-down version of the Concerto No. 12 in A, K. 414.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Appearing with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra eight years ago, 23-year-old Alisa Weilerstein was a playfully kittenish cello soloist in Tchaikovsky's "Rococo" Variations. I wrote then that when she matures, look out. I can take no credit for divination. The crowd at UCLA's Royce Hall was clearly captivated. Weilerstein had been on LACO music director Jeffrey Kahane's radar three years before she made her debut with the orchestra. She was already being followed with intense interest by the music business.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2013 | By David Ng
When she took over the role of executive director of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra in 2010, Rachel Fine had to learn the ropes of an established organization while also dealing with the recession that put a crimp in fundraising. In those difficult months, the orchestra had to make a number of hard decisions, including suspending its family series and reducing the number of musicians at certain performances. Now approaching her third year with the company, Fine appears to have fully settled into her job. She said that the orchestra's outlook appears stronger after months of turbulence thanks to a rise in individual giving and an adventurous artistic slate under conductor Jeffrey Kahane.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2012 | By David Ng
The Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra has received a hefty stocking stuffer this season in the form of a monetary gift from Terri and Jerry Kohl. The couple's $1-million challenge gift is the largest in the organization's history, according to orchestra leaders. The Kohls are the founders of Brighton Collectibles, the Southern California retailer of women's accessories. LACO said the challenge grant -- given with a request for a matching gift -- has already been met by two anonymous donations totaling an additional $1 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2012 | By Richard S. Ginell
For their last 2012 program in Glendale's Alex Theatre Saturday night, Jeffrey Kahane and the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra needed no soloists other than Kahane himself. The program was three-fourths American -   Gershwin, Copland and John Adams - with one Czech interloper, Dvorák, who came to America well after the included Serenade for Winds, Op. 44 was written. It easily could have been an all-American program -  there's a universe of superb chamber-orchestra pieces to choose from -  but as it emerged, one could sense some interlocking of gears that made the evening a unified whole.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
An orchestra of many moving parts, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra does not have a home. Besides its main orchestral series, it has a Westside chamber series, a Baroque series downtown and five fall exclusive foodie fundraisers in classy homes around town. But that orchestral series, given on Saturday nights at the Alex Theatre in Glendale and Sunday nights in Royce Hall at UCLA, is LACO's real bread and butter. This season's opener, which I heard at Royce, was a showcase program, itself made up of many moving parts, within which there were more moving parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2012 | By Kevin Berger
BROOKLYN, N.Y. - Inside his airy loft last week, Andrew Norman was nervous as he talked about his childhood and God. The 32-year-old composer, a finalist this year for the Pulitzer Prize in music, spoke in anxious halts and starts about his upbringing in "a strict religious environment" in Modesto, where his father is a pastor at an evangelical church. Norman was tense because he rarely spoke about his personal life and wasn't quite sure what to say. And since he had left home as a teenager to study music at USC, he had wrestled with his faith, an inner conflict heard in his music, notably his searing, Pulitzer-nominated work for violin, viola and cello, "The Companion Guide to Rome," a portrait of nine churches and saints.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Gabriel Kahane, best known as an indie singer-songwriter, was his own charismatic singer-songwriter Saturday night in the West Coast premiere of his affecting "Crane Palimpsest" at the Alex Theatre. As he does in a club, he used a microphone and wore jeans. He accompanied himself on guitar and piano. He also had the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra on hand, and he gratefully used everything at his disposal to merge pop and new music sensibilities naturally and unpretentiously. Composer-performers who write orchestral pieces for themselves as soloists can these days be anything they like.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2012 | Scott Timberg
A bridge, of course, is a stretch of metal or stone or something that spans, typically, a body of water. But it also unites two disparate things that would otherwise remain disconnected. So it's only fitting that what could prove a breakthrough piece for the polymath young composer Gabriel Kahane is a piece about the Brooklyn Bridge. Kahane was led to this particular structure by his current locale -- he's part of a Brooklyn new-music renaissance -- as well as Hart Crane's 1930 poem "The Bridge," now considered a landmark of modernism.
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