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Jeffrey Knowles

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeffrey Knowles got the idea back when he commuted from his home in San Diego to work in Los Angeles: If he could listen to anything to relieve his terrible freeway ennui, what would it be? * Now, having answered that question for himself, he's producing and marketing "Train of Thought," cassette tapes filled with a lively mix of spoken word and music from around the world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1993 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeffrey Knowles got the idea back when he commuted from his home in San Diego to work in Los Angeles: If he could listen to anything to relieve his terrible freeway ennui, what would it be? * Now, having answered that question for himself, he's producing and marketing "Train of Thought," cassette tapes filled with a lively mix of spoken word and music from around the world.
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NEWS
February 7, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Florida State University freshman was charged with setting 18 small fires on campus, sometimes six or seven a day. Students and faculty members were relieved by the arrest, which ended a week of increasing tension at the 28,000-student school in Tallahassee. Jeffrey T. Knowles, 19, of Fort Pierce, Fla., was suspended from school and held without bail after telling investigators he set 19 fires, police said. He was not charged in one case still under investigation.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having shut down Napster Inc.'s free song-sharing service, record companies and Hollywood studios filed suit against a new and potentially more elusive trio of companies that let consumers copy music, movies and software through the Internet. The targets--MusicCity.com Inc., Grokster Ltd. and Consumer Empowerment--provide free software that let users find and retrieve files from each other's computers.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2001 | JON HEALEY and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Napster Inc.'s freewheeling days as a haven for music piracy were brought to an end Tuesday, as a federal judge ordered the popular service to block all copyrighted songs identified by the music companies. The preliminary injunction, issued by U.S. District Judge Marilyn Hall Patel on Monday night, requires the major music labels to provide Napster with the song title, artist name, file name tied with the copyrighted tunes and proof that they control the copyright.
NATIONAL
May 9, 2002 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's long been the definition of ultimate physical fitness: perfect abs. But in recent months, a chiseled gut has been dangled in front of even couch potatoes. A no-pain, no-effort "six-pack" is just a credit card purchase and an electrical outlet away--or so promised the buff infomercial hawkers of electronic abdominal belts. It sounded too good to be true. And it was, federal regulators said Wednesday.
NEWS
November 9, 2000 | JON HEALEY, jon.healey@latimes.com
Tyler Shaw of Woodbridge, Va., uses Internet file-sharing services to grab free copies of indie pop or punk songs before deciding whether to buy a CD. Wayne Guerrini of San Diego and his pals exchange homemade jazz or progressive rock CDs with songs culled from their music collections and the Internet. Markus Pope of Springfield, Mo., and his co-workers have turned a computer in their office into a way station for free songs downloaded from MP3.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2002 | JON HEALEY and JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Napster Inc., the Bay Area start-up that brought online music piracy to the masses, teetered on the brink of bankruptcy Tuesday as it struggled to transform itself from industry outlaw to ally. Company founder Shawn Fanning and two other top executives resigned, and the company told employees it was insolvent after a deal with global media conglomerate Bertelsmann collapsed.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recording industry's legal assault has floored Napster Inc., once the king of the Internet's song-swapping services. Now the major record labels are gearing up for Round 2, as the fight moves to the marketplace. Within the next few months, Net powerhouses America Online, Yahoo, MSN and RealNetworks are expected to launch subscription music services that are either backed or owned by the labels.
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