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Jeffrey L Bada

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NEWS
August 18, 1988 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
Two scientists from UC San Diego say they have debunked the widely accepted idea that primitive life originated in a chemical soup in volcanic hot-water vents on the ocean floor. The researchers have examined the chemical reactions the theory would require and concluded that it just was not possible for life-giving molecules to have been synthesized in the hot temperatures and high pressure of the vent areas.
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NEWS
August 18, 1988 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
Two scientists from UC San Diego say they have debunked the widely accepted idea that primitive life originated in a chemical soup in volcanic hot-water vents on the ocean floor. The researchers have examined the chemical reactions the theory would require and concluded that it just was not possible for life-giving molecules to have been synthesized in the hot temperatures and high pressure of the vent areas.
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NEWS
March 25, 1988 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
Scientists at Stanford University and UC San Diego have found an easy way to detect minuscule amounts of organic chemicals inside meteorites, a technique that promises to shed new light on the origin of the solar system as well as to answer more down-to-earth questions. The laser technique could give researchers quick access for the first time to a comprehensive range of clues about how organic chemicals formed in the dusty cloud from which the planets condensed 4.5 billion years ago.
NEWS
June 19, 1986 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
French researchers have found new evidence that man has lived in South America for at least 32,000 years, suggesting that Asians migrated across what is now the Bering Strait to the Americas more than twice as long ago as is currently believed. The new report, published in today's issue of the British journal Nature, is the latest piece of evidence in what has often been an acrimonious scientific dispute about when the first settlers arrived on this continent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Stanley Miller, the UC San Diego chemist who was the first to demonstrate that the organic molecules necessary for life could be generated in a laboratory flask simulating the primitive Earth's atmosphere, died Sunday from heart failure in a hospital in National City. He was 77. Miller had suffered a series of strokes since 1999 and had been living in a nursing home, according to his brother, Donald. "Stanley Miller was the father of origin-of-life chemistry," said marine chemist Jeffrey L.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
Scientists examining ancient rocks have detected organic molecules that they believe could only have been deposited when an extraterrestrial object, probably a comet, crashed into the Earth 65 million years ago. Some researchers say the finding lends powerful support to the hotly debated theory that a cosmic collision threw up a worldwide dust cloud that hampered photosynthesis and set off a mass extinction of dinosaurs and many other animals and...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
UC San Diego scientists examining ancient rocks have detected organic molecules that they believe could only have been deposited when an extraterrestrial object, probably a comet, crashed into the Earth 65 million years ago. Some researchers say the finding lends powerful support to the hotly debated theory that a cosmic collision threw up a worldwide dust cloud that hampered photosynthesis and set off a mass extinction of dinosaurs and many...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1988 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, Times Staff Writer
A team of scientists at Stanford University and UC San Diego have found an easy way to detect minuscule amounts of organic chemicals inside meteorites, a technique that promises to shed new light on the origin of the solar system as well as to answer more down-to-Earth questions. The two-minute laser technique could give researchers quick access for the first time to a comprehensive range of clues about how organic chemicals formed in the dusty cloud from which the planets condensed 4.
NEWS
May 15, 1997 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Come, take a seat in the kitchen of creation and try to replicate the lost recipe for the origin of life. Be warned. This is a hypothetical dish that must be prepared through trial and error from the raw chemistry of Earth and space--without benefit of conventional biology or supernatural intervention. So, experiment. Stoke the primordial planet's volcanic ovens. Stir its ocean caldron with wind. Boil it. Ice it. Season it with cyanide. Pepper the mix with comet dust and leaven it with time.
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