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Jeffrey L Kimball

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As dust motes float in the sunlight streaming through the warehouse window, the camera limns every glistening bead of sweat that rolls across Sylvester Stallone's straining pectorals. Here on the set of "The Specialist," the atmosphere is as thick as the heat. "Every shot," says producer Jerry Weintraub, "is like a videotape painting." "Provocative," says director Luis Llosa. "We want this scene to be provocative." Even Stallone is pumped.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As dust motes float in the sunlight streaming through the warehouse window, the camera limns every glistening bead of sweat that rolls across Sylvester Stallone's straining pectorals. Here on the set of "The Specialist," the atmosphere is as thick as the heat. "Every shot," says producer Jerry Weintraub, "is like a videotape painting." "Provocative," says director Luis Llosa. "We want this scene to be provocative." Even Stallone is pumped.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
If there is a lesson to be learned from "Stigmata," this is it: Never send your daughter a rosary stolen from the corpse of a recently deceased saintly priest who for mysterious reasons had hidden himself away in a tiny village in the hinterlands of Brazil. Don't even think about it.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1998 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
Two sexually precocious high school seniors are washing a Jeep in a residential driveway in suburban Florida, and indulging in a little water fight while they're at it. The water does what water does, makes the girls' skimpy clothing cling to their bodies, and clinging does what clinging does--drives men crazy. But what men? The Jeep's owner, a teacher that one of the girls has a crush on, is in the house. There's no one there to watch the show they're putting on, so who is it for? It must be .
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
There may once have been a real movie rattling inside the empty studio package known as "The Big Bounce," but no longer. That's too bad. Based on the 1969 crime novel by Elmore Leonard, the film was directed by George Armitage, whose slim resume includes a couple of prime pulp entertainments, including the darkly funny "Grosse Point Blank" and the feloniously underrated adaptation of Charles Willeford's "Miami Blues."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Ten years ago, the amusing "Get Shorty," based on the Elmore Leonard novel, introduced John Travolta as Chili Palmer, a Miami loan shark and movie fan, who on a trip to L.A. became convinced the motion picture business was a snap compared to wheeling and dealing in the underworld. Palmer is back in "Be Cool," and although Travolta is as smooth as ever, the picture is a bust, a grimly unfunny comedy with no connection to reality, and worst of all, running on and on for two dismal hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1994 | TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Specialist" could have used one. Slovenly, incoherent, hootable, this Sylvester Stallone action thriller is definitely a no yo. Stallone plays explosives expert Ray Quick, a former CIA operative who is enticed out of his shadowy confines by May Munro (Sharon Stone), a woman he has met only by telephone. As a young girl in Miami, May witnessed the murder of her parents at the hands of the criminal Leon family. Now she seeks pay-back.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Except for irredeemably artistic types like Taiwan's Hou Hsaio Hsien or Iran's Abbas Kiarostami (though even they might have been tempted), star-producer Tom Cruise could have gotten any director in the world to do the sequel to his very successful "Mission: Impossible." The man asked was John Woo, and the result, now cryptically titled "M:I-2," lavishly displays the reasons for that choice all over the wide screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Ben Affleck has had such a rough year (or so I've read) that it almost seems unfair to pick on either his newest film or latest nontabloid performance. Still, in the interest of stargazing and semiotics, it does seem worth mentioning that Affleck, a movie actor of some callow charm, has recently taken to dividing his performances between lowered-chin sensitivity for his smaller, more complex roles and big-chin brashness for his more costly studio gigs. "Paycheck" is big chin all the way.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2002 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
With all the recent fuss over the longevity of the James Bond franchise, the folks over at "Star Trek" must be feeling like intergalactic chopped liver. Has everyone forgotten that since starting out in 1966, the Trekkers have turned out four TV series with hundreds and hundreds of episodes, not to mention 10 motion pictures, all complete with sharp uniforms, menacing aliens and bracing commands from the bridge?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2006 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
In 1966, Texas Western, a relatively small college of mining and metallurgy, stormed to the national collegiate men's basketball championship over Adolph Rupp's vaunted University of Kentucky Wildcats. It's a terrific story of a team of Davids with hoop dreams running a gantlet of patrician Goliaths against a backdrop of momentous social change.
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