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Jeffrey Lewis

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1991 | NEIL KOCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Koch is former West Coast editor of Channels magazine
"In the late 1940s I collaborated on a short-lived (four performances), long-forgotten revue for the Los Angeles stage called 'My L.A.' " So begins playwright-screenwriter-television writer Larry Gelbart's program notes for his Tony-winning "City of Angels," now midway through its four-month run at the Shubert and still running on Broadway where it's been for the last two years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1991 | NEIL KOCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Koch is former West Coast editor of Channels magazine
"In the late 1940s I collaborated on a short-lived (four performances), long-forgotten revue for the Los Angeles stage called 'My L.A.' " So begins playwright-screenwriter-television writer Larry Gelbart's program notes for his Tony-winning "City of Angels," now midway through its four-month run at the Shubert and still running on Broadway where it's been for the last two years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1990
I resented very much your front-page headline (June 30) "Orange County Among Most Wealthy, Miserly in U.S.," but became totally incensed when I turned to Page A18 and found the second portion of your article headlined, "Survey: O.C. Among Wealthiest, Cheapest." "Miserly" and "cheap" are harsh words that connote meanness and selfishness. Simply because Orange County is not beset with social problems as severe as those of many other counties across America is no reason for your editors to assail the character of an entire county's citizenry.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Lifestories' Up in the Air: "Lifestories," NBC's low-rated but critically praised medical drama, has stopped production and will be pulled from its 8 p.m. Sunday slot after the Dec. 2 broadcast. But the network said Tuesday that it will try out the series in a new time period--Tuesday, Dec. 11, at 10 p.m.--before determining its fate. Contractually, NBC has until Dec. 15 to re-order new episodes. Producer Jeffrey Lewis said that the Dec.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1987 | From Diane Haithman
"Hill Street Blues" dies with Tuesday's show--and what dies with it are some old subplots from the card file. Exec producer Jeffrey Lewis told us a few. Imagine if you will . . . Renko gets a personal organizer, "one of those big silly things they sell for 50 bucks," with space for his finances, his horoscope and his personal goals. He's embarrassed when it is stolen and the gang reads about his weird lifetime ambitions. Renko's wife puts a haddock in his briefcase.
NEWS
June 9, 1999
What changes do you see in the new millennium? I predict a cure for diseases such as AIDS and cancer. I see genetic engineering becoming widely available--but hopefully, not widely used. --Jeremy Shively, 17, Lutheran High I think that people will become more violent if we don't do something about it. --Stephanie Granillo, 18, Rosary High Athletes will become better, and more rules and regulations will have to be enforced to ensure safer and more realistic games.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1985 | MORGAN GENDEL, Times Staff Writer
Reports a few months back that NBC's multi-award-winning cop show, "Hill Street Blues," would be simplified next season may have been premature. If anything, it will be more complex. Viewers no longer will be able to count on the familiar roll-call-to-nightfall formula, and the cast roster will vary from show to show. Consider: --The number of familiar faces actually will increase. Three actors will be dropped from the list of regulars and one will be added, for a total roster of 15.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1985 | MORGAN GENDEL, Times Staff Writer
How could MTM Enterprises let the father of "Hill Street Blues" get away? Fans and industry people alike were pondering the question Friday even as Steven Bochco, co-creator and executive producer of what many consider this decade's most ground-breaking series, announced he will make 20th Century Fox his new creative home. Fox TV President Harris L.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1988
Scripts about "L.A. Law," Anastasia, Gen. George S. Patton and Sobibor have earned their writers nominations for the Writers Guild of America Televison Awards. Winners in television, radio and motion picture categories (whose nominees were announced previously) will be announced March 18 at the 40th annual Writers Guild dinner, held jointly here at the Beverly Hilton and in New York. TV and radio nominees include: Original Long Form: Steven Bochco, Terry Louise Fisher, "L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1985 | MORGAN GENDEL
Viewers tuning in to the season premiere of "Hill Street Blues" Thursday (10 p.m. on NBC) will see a very different episode than what they've been accustomed to in the last five seasons. "Blues in the Night" follows the "Hill Street" regulars through their after-hours activities, some of which constitute "the mildest stories we've ever told on the show" and others of which contain "high drama," according to the series' new executive producer, Jeffrey Lewis. Lt.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2005 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
Two Southern California Gas Co. employees sued the company in federal court Friday, alleging that its conversion to a so-called cash-balance pension plan discriminated against older workers. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, claims that the company illegally halted benefits paid to older workers after it converted from a traditional pension system to a cash-balance plan in 1998.
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