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Jeffrey Lubell

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BUSINESS
November 5, 2012 | By Shan Li
True Religion Inc., the struggling luxury denim maker that recently put itself up for sale, reported a slight rise in third-quarter profit due to growth in its wholesale business. In the three months ended Sept. 30, the Vernon retailer said profit was $12.3 million, or 49 cents a share, a 1.7% rise from $12.1 million, or 48 cents a share, a year earlier. Total sales jumped 9.4% to $118.5 million. Its wholesale segment, which sells to off-price and specialty retail stores, grew 35.4% to $29.8 million.
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BUSINESS
November 5, 2012 | By Shan Li
True Religion Inc., the struggling luxury denim maker that recently put itself up for sale, reported a slight rise in third-quarter profit due to growth in its wholesale business. In the three months ended Sept. 30, the Vernon retailer said profit was $12.3 million, or 49 cents a share, a 1.7% rise from $12.1 million, or 48 cents a share, a year earlier. Total sales jumped 9.4% to $118.5 million. Its wholesale segment, which sells to off-price and specialty retail stores, grew 35.4% to $29.8 million.
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BUSINESS
February 1, 2009 | Andrea Chang
The gig: Chairman and chief executive of True Religion Apparel Inc., a Vernon-based clothing company best known for its premium denim. True Religion Brand Jeans retail for $172 to nearly $500 a pair and can be found at upscale department stores, specialty boutiques, the company's own retail locations and online. True Religion went public in 2003 and is expecting last year's revenue to total about $265 million. Background: Grew up on Long Island and in Brooklyn, N.Y.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2009 | Andrea Chang
The gig: Chairman and chief executive of True Religion Apparel Inc., a Vernon-based clothing company best known for its premium denim. True Religion Brand Jeans retail for $172 to nearly $500 a pair and can be found at upscale department stores, specialty boutiques, the company's own retail locations and online. True Religion went public in 2003 and is expecting last year's revenue to total about $265 million. Background: Grew up on Long Island and in Brooklyn, N.Y.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
True Religion Apparel Inc., a maker of $300 jeans worn by celebrities including soccer star David Beckham and actress Angelina Jolie, said Wal-Mart Stores Inc.'s Sam's Club warehouse chain was illegally selling clothing with its trademark. The infringing apparel is presented in "a confusingly deceptive manner" and is of "inferior quality," True Religion said in a complaint filed Wednesday in federal court in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2006 | From Reuters
Premium jeans maker True Religion Apparel Inc. on Tuesday reported quarterly earnings that fell significantly short of Wall Street expectations and cut its 2006 outlook, sending its shares down more than 22% after hours. Chief Financial Officer Charles Lesser blamed exceptionally warm weather outside the U.S. and softer-than-expected sales in Japan for the lowered sales outlook. Shares of True Religion fell $4.78 to $16.48 in extended trading after having risen $1.22 to $21.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jeans maker True Religion Apparel Inc. said Thursday that it had hired financial advisors to help it consider "strategic alternatives" despite strong department store sales that drove second-quarter profit up 16%. Shares of True Religion rose 49 cents, or 2.8%, to $18 in after-hours trading after slipping 13 cents to $17.51 in the regular session. Earnings were issued after the markets closed.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Americans are becoming increasingly house-poor. Homeowners in every state but one spent more of their incomes on housing last year than at the start of the decade, data released Monday by the Census Bureau showed. Those in Alaska spent the same. Nationwide, homeowners spent nearly 21% of their incomes on housing costs last year, up from just under 19% in 1999. California stands out among states with high housing costs. It ranked No. 1 in median home value, at $477,700; No.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2005 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
Prices show few signs of easing, buyers say they won't back off, and analysts are left to wonder whether the bubble is going to burst. The commodity in question? Not Southern California housing but premium jeans -- frayed, faded or ripped, and sometimes all three, selling for upward of $400. Helping to fuel the frenzy is True Religion Apparel Inc., a Los Angeles company that would be happy to burst all that bubble talk. Three years after its start-up, the manufacturer has become the No.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2006 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
Your butt's not getting bigger. The jeans are getting smaller. Just ask shopper Lisa Korn, who is doing a torturous tango with a pair of skinny new jeans inside the Ron Herman boutique on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles. She tugs at the garment, performs deep knee bends in front of the mirror, and even hoists her slender self on a display table to see whether the jeans dip too low in the back when she sits down. "I'm dying," she groans. "Even in a [size] 28, I'm dying."
NEWS
July 30, 1999 | DARYL STRICKLAND and JOHN BALZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The federal government on Thursday unveiled one of the most ambitious programs ever to house moderate- and low-income families, announcing $488 billion in funding that could turn tens of millions of families into new homeowners and renters in the next decade. More than $34 billion will be spent in the five-county Los Angeles area, helping more than 360,000 families in the region, which has seen home prices and rents soar in the last year as the economy continues to create more jobs than housing.
REAL ESTATE
June 4, 2006 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
Grammy-winning saxophonist-songwriter Kenny G is beating the rising cost of gasoline prices by walking to his newly built getaway in Malibu. He can go there on foot because the retreat is next door to the home that he bought in 1998 for $12.5 million as a surprise for his wife, Lyndie Benson. The idea behind the getaway was to provide a place for the soprano sax player to take a break without having to drive.
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