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Jeffrey M Masson

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NEWS
September 10, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Thursday set the stage for a replay of one of the juiciest libel trials in recent history but dismissed a key defendant--the New Yorker magazine--from the case. Capping weeks of speculation, U.S. District Judge Eugene F. Lynch granted psychoanalyst Jeffrey M. Masson a retrial of his lawsuit against writer Janet Malcolm, whom he accused of libeling him in a profile in the New Yorker in 1983.
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NEWS
June 6, 1996 | Times Wire Services
A federal appeals court Wednesday rejected a Berkeley psychoanalyst's latest attempt to revive his 12-year-old libel suit against freelance writer Janet Malcolm and the New Yorker magazine. A lawyer for Jeffrey Masson claimed that a trial judge hindered Masson's attempt to prove that Malcolm made up quotes in an article she wrote about him in 1983. Masson charged that the story ruined his career as a scholar. But the 9th U.S.
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NEWS
June 4, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A psychoanalyst's libel case against the New Yorker magazine and writer Janet Malcolm ended in a mistrial Thursday, but it will take a judge's ruling to define what that conclusion means. On their fourth day of deliberations, jurors delivered a partial verdict concluding that Malcolm had libeled Jeffrey M. Masson with two quotations in a New Yorker article.
NEWS
December 5, 1994 | SARAH KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 10 years, Freud scholar Jeffrey Masson waged a futile legal battle to persuade jurors that magazine writer Janet Malcolm violated journalistic ethics in a controversial profile she wrote about him. A federal court jury disagreed and exonerated Malcolm last month. But next spring, Masson will get another chance to argue journalism ethics--from the front of a classroom at UC Berkeley.
NEWS
August 5, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
The federal court of appeals ruling Friday that the press has a right to change quotations in stories and sometimes even fabricate them may be one case in which judges are granting freedoms to the press that most journalists don't want. At least they don't want them now that the tape recorder has come along. If quotes don't mean anything, said Bill Kovach, director of the Neiman Foundation for Journalism, "you might as well eliminate the definition of a quotation mark."
NEWS
August 5, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
In a major First Amendment decision, a federal appeals court ruled Friday that a journalist may deliberately alter quotations provided that the fabricated quotations reflect the essence of what a public figure said in an interview. In a 2-1 decision, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in Pasadena upheld a lower court dismissal of a libel suit filed by writer-psychoanalyst Jeffrey M. Masson against author Janet Malcolm and her publishers, The New Yorker and Alfred A. Knopf.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant 1st Amendment decision, a federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled Monday that once a publisher has doubts about the accuracy of a story, it cannot ignore those doubts before printing the article, even though it has no duty to investigate accuracy in the first place. The ruling paves the way for a Berkeley psychoanalyst to go to trial against the New Yorker magazine, as well as one of its writers.
NEWS
December 5, 1994 | SARAH KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 10 years, Freud scholar Jeffrey Masson waged a futile legal battle to persuade jurors that magazine writer Janet Malcolm violated journalistic ethics in a controversial profile she wrote about him. A federal court jury disagreed and exonerated Malcolm last month. But next spring, Masson will get another chance to argue journalism ethics--from the front of a classroom at UC Berkeley.
NEWS
June 6, 1996 | Times Wire Services
A federal appeals court Wednesday rejected a Berkeley psychoanalyst's latest attempt to revive his 12-year-old libel suit against freelance writer Janet Malcolm and the New Yorker magazine. A lawyer for Jeffrey Masson claimed that a trial judge hindered Masson's attempt to prove that Malcolm made up quotes in an article she wrote about him in 1983. Masson charged that the story ruined his career as a scholar. But the 9th U.S.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The legendary child psychologist Bruno Bettelheim, who before his suicide last year at age 86 had written some of the world's most influential books on children's development, plagiarized ideas and words in his award-winning book on fairy tales, according to a leading UC Berkeley scholar.
NEWS
September 10, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge on Thursday set the stage for a replay of one of the juiciest libel trials in recent history but dismissed a key defendant--the New Yorker magazine--from the case. Capping weeks of speculation, U.S. District Judge Eugene F. Lynch granted psychoanalyst Jeffrey M. Masson a retrial of his lawsuit against writer Janet Malcolm, whom he accused of libeling him in a profile in the New Yorker in 1983.
NEWS
June 4, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A psychoanalyst's libel case against the New Yorker magazine and writer Janet Malcolm ended in a mistrial Thursday, but it will take a judge's ruling to define what that conclusion means. On their fourth day of deliberations, jurors delivered a partial verdict concluding that Malcolm had libeled Jeffrey M. Masson with two quotations in a New Yorker article.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a significant 1st Amendment decision, a federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled Monday that once a publisher has doubts about the accuracy of a story, it cannot ignore those doubts before printing the article, even though it has no duty to investigate accuracy in the first place. The ruling paves the way for a Berkeley psychoanalyst to go to trial against the New Yorker magazine, as well as one of its writers.
NEWS
August 5, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
In a major First Amendment decision, a federal appeals court ruled Friday that a journalist may deliberately alter quotations provided that the fabricated quotations reflect the essence of what a public figure said in an interview. In a 2-1 decision, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in Pasadena upheld a lower court dismissal of a libel suit filed by writer-psychoanalyst Jeffrey M. Masson against author Janet Malcolm and her publishers, The New Yorker and Alfred A. Knopf.
NEWS
August 5, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
The federal court of appeals ruling Friday that the press has a right to change quotations in stories and sometimes even fabricate them may be one case in which judges are granting freedoms to the press that most journalists don't want. At least they don't want them now that the tape recorder has come along. If quotes don't mean anything, said Bill Kovach, director of the Neiman Foundation for Journalism, "you might as well eliminate the definition of a quotation mark."
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Thursday revived a $10-million libel suit against author Janet Malcolm and New Yorker magazine, ruling that a writer who "deliberately or recklessly altered" a quotation so as to change the meaning of what the speaker said can be forced to pay damages. However, the high court said writers and reporters may not be punished for "minor inaccuracies" or even a deliberate rewording that does not "result in a material change in the meaning" of what was said.
BOOKS
December 7, 2003
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