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Jeffrey P Koplan

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NEWS
February 22, 2002 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Jeffrey P. Koplan, who guided the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the challenge of responding to last year's anthrax attacks, announced Thursday that he would resign as director of the public health agency. The resignation, which will take effect March 31, will add to the list of federal health agencies with no permanent leader.
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NEWS
February 22, 2002 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Jeffrey P. Koplan, who guided the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the challenge of responding to last year's anthrax attacks, announced Thursday that he would resign as director of the public health agency. The resignation, which will take effect March 31, will add to the list of federal health agencies with no permanent leader.
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HEALTH
July 7, 2003 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Many more Americans than previously believed are injured each year in sporting and recreational activities. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, conducting the broadest investigation to date of U.S. sports and recreational injuries, has found that about 7 million people per year seek medical advice or treatment related to physical activities.
NEWS
April 18, 2001 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recent trend of multiple births, in which mothers using fertility treatments often gave birth to three or more babies, has dropped for the first time in a decade, federal health officials reported Tuesday.
NEWS
January 13, 2000 | By MARLENE CIMONS and ALISSA J. RUBIN,
President Clinton today will propose a funding increase for research into potentially cancer-causing environmental toxins that would allow federal scientists to quadruple the number of dangerous toxins they study. The money, which would flow to the Environmental Health Laboratory at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, would permit the lab to increase from 25 to 100 the number of potentially toxic substances it monitors.
NEWS
August 31, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although deaths from AIDS continued to drop in 1998, the decline fell far short of the dramatic reduction of the previous year, public health officials said Monday, dampening hopes that powerful new drugs finally have brought the epidemic under control. That patients have been living longer and with a nearly normal quality of life had inspired a public sense of euphoria over the battle against AIDS.
NEWS
December 1, 2000 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's lung cancer rate decreased by 14% between 1988 and 1997, far outpacing declines in other regions of the country and prompting jubilant federal health officials to credit the state's stringent anti-tobacco programs. "We are very, very excited about this," said Terry Pechacek of the office on smoking and health at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
September 12, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The rates of obesity and diabetes in the United States have grown by 50% or more over the last decade, and the increase seems to be accelerating, according to new figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. According to the study, the proportion of Americans who are obese--at least 30 to 50 pounds overweight, depending on height--rose from 12% in 1991 to 19.8% in 2000. Over the same period, the proportion who are diabetic increased from 4.9% to 7.3%.
NEWS
July 18, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Impoverished Americans, lacking access to quality health care, are more likely than others to die needlessly from cancer, according to a major new study released Monday by the American Cancer Society. "The chance of getting cancer and dying from it is disproportionately higher among poor Americans, regardless of race," Dr. Harold P. Freeman, president of the organization, said at a press conference.
NEWS
January 25, 2002 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a narrowing of the gap between the health of whites and minority groups, "substantial" differences persist, according to a federal study released Thursday. Since 1990, Americans overall have grown healthier, said the report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which tracked health matters ranging from prenatal care to suicide rates from 1990 to 1998. But minorities, in many cases, did not keep pace with the improvements enjoyed by white Americans.
NEWS
October 28, 2001 | MARLENE CIMONS and CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the anthrax scare unfolds, America's national doctor has been largely out of sight, unable to reassure a jittery public about the health threat. Even as Surgeon General David Satcher steps up appearances on talk shows and at news conferences, some health experts say it is too little too late. The Bush administration, in its efforts to contain the escalating crisis, has virtually ignored its lame-duck surgeon general. In part, that's because Satcher is a Clinton administration holdover.
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