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Jeffrey R Immelt

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BUSINESS
November 28, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
So different in some ways, so much alike in others. Jeffrey R. Immelt, the General Electric Co. manager chosen to succeed the venerated John F. "Jack" Welch Jr. as GE's chief executive next year, is a tall, loping man with an easy manner and warm style, whereas Welch is known for his tough, exacting and aggressive approach to management. But there is no question what they have in common: an indisputable desire to lead and improve a company's fortunes, often through radical change.
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BUSINESS
February 28, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The chairman and chief executive of General Electric Co. received $15.2 million in compensation last year, according to a company proxy. Jeffrey Immelt, 51, was paid $3.3 million in salary, a $5-million bonus and $548,013 in other benefits, including private use of company airplanes. In addition, he was awarded performance share units valued at $6.3 million on the day they were granted last year.
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NEWS
November 28, 2000 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Capping one of the most closely watched corporate-succession dramas ever, General Electric Co. on Monday tapped the head of its medical systems group to replace legendary Chief Executive John F. "Jack" Welch Jr. when Welch retires at the end of next year. The naming of Jeffrey R. Immelt, 44, concludes a selection process that was eagerly awaited not only by the business world but also by millions of GE customers, suppliers, employees and stockholders.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
On Sept. 7, less than two weeks from today, General Electric's charismatic chief executive, Jack Welch, will formally retire, leaving to his handpicked successor, Jeffrey Immelt, the challenge of continuing the growth that has given GE greater stock market value than any other firm in the United States, and possibly the world. At more than $400 billion, the total value of GE's shares is far beyond that of any other company.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The chairman and chief executive of General Electric Co. received $15.2 million in compensation last year, according to a company proxy. Jeffrey Immelt, 51, was paid $3.3 million in salary, a $5-million bonus and $548,013 in other benefits, including private use of company airplanes. In addition, he was awarded performance share units valued at $6.3 million on the day they were granted last year.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
On Sept. 7, less than two weeks from today, General Electric's charismatic chief executive, Jack Welch, will formally retire, leaving to his handpicked successor, Jeffrey Immelt, the challenge of continuing the growth that has given GE greater stock market value than any other firm in the United States, and possibly the world. At more than $400 billion, the total value of GE's shares is far beyond that of any other company.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2002 | From Associated Press
General Electric Co. is expected to announce a series of corporate governance measures today, including the appointment of a presiding director to lead meetings of independent board members. The presiding director will lead at least three meetings annually for the company's board without management present, GE Chairman and Chief Executive Jeffrey R. Immelt said. GE will implement a stock ownership requirement for the top 23 executives based on salary, Immelt said.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2003 | From Reuters
General Electric Co. will put its money behind six fledgling businesses, including consumer finance and Spanish-language broadcasting, that can generate $1 billion in operating profit each within the next few years, Chairman Jeffrey R. Immelt said in a letter to shareholders. He said further that GE would pare businesses in which slow growth is expected as it works to return to double-digit growth.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
General Electric Co. said it expected 2008 profit of $2.42 a share, up at least 10% from this year, but falling short of analysts' expectations. Analysts surveyed by Thomson Financial expected per-share earnings of $2.49. Revenue for 2008 is expected at $195 billion, Chief Executive Jeffrey R. Immelt said at an analysts meeting in New York. Analysts are projecting revenue of $186.5 billion next year.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
General Electric Co. said Friday that it would reduce its divisions to four from six, reflecting Chief Executive Jeffrey R. Immelt's efforts to shed slow-growing businesses as the company's stock trades near a five-year low. The main divisions will now be GE Technology Infrastructure, GE Energy Infrastructure, GE Capital and NBC Universal, the Fairfield, Conn.-based company said. The new structure emphasizes Immelt's priorities as he tries to shield GE from economic swings by divesting consumer units and to exploit its role as the world's biggest maker of power-plant turbines and jet engines.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
So different in some ways, so much alike in others. Jeffrey R. Immelt, the General Electric Co. manager chosen to succeed the venerated John F. "Jack" Welch Jr. as GE's chief executive next year, is a tall, loping man with an easy manner and warm style, whereas Welch is known for his tough, exacting and aggressive approach to management. But there is no question what they have in common: an indisputable desire to lead and improve a company's fortunes, often through radical change.
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Capping one of the most closely watched corporate-succession dramas ever, General Electric Co. on Monday tapped the head of its medical systems group to replace legendary Chief Executive John F. "Jack" Welch Jr. when Welch retires at the end of next year. The naming of Jeffrey R. Immelt, 44, concludes a selection process that was eagerly awaited not only by the business world but also by millions of GE customers, suppliers, employees and stockholders.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
The chief executive of a General Electric Co. subsidiary filed a federal lawsuit Tuesday accusing the conglomerate of discriminating against him and other black managers and employees in pay, promotions and perks. Marc Thomas, president and chief executive of GE Aviation Materials, accused the parent company of refusing to promote or reward him despite exemplary sales and profit in the business he runs, and instead trying to push him out when he complained of discrimination.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2008 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
Even General Electric Co., one of the world's largest and most respected companies, needs a helping hand during a financial crisis. The industrial giant got it Wednesday from investor extraordinaire Warren E. Buffett. Berkshire Hathaway Inc., the holding company run by the billionaire, agreed to buy $3 billion in preferred stock as part of a plan by GE to raise $15 billion.
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