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Jeffrey R Macdonald

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NEWS
June 3, 1992 | Special to The Times
Jeffrey R. MacDonald, whose murder case inspired the best-selling book "Fatal Vision," on Tuesday lost his bid for a new trial. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled unanimously that newly identified evidence raised by MacDonald's lawyers "neither supports MacDonald's account of the murders nor discredits the government's theory" of how the killings occurred. MacDonald's wife, Colette, and their two daughters were clubbed and stabbed to death on Feb.
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December 15, 2005 | From Associated Press
Lawyers for a former Green Beret convicted in the 1970 slayings of his wife and daughters, a crime dramatized in the bestseller and miniseries "Fatal Vision," say that a new witness has come forward and that the court should throw out his murder convictions. A former deputy U.S. marshal says he heard a defense witness tell a prosecutor that she was at Jeffrey MacDonald's home on the night of the killings, according to a motion filed with the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals. Jimmy B.
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NEWS
April 7, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-two years later, Jeffrey R. MacDonald still insists that he didn't do it: He didn't stab and club to death his pregnant wife, Colette, and their two young daughters early in the morning of Feb. 17, 1970, at Ft. Bragg, N.C. MacDonald, a physician whose case was etched into the nation's consciousness with the 1980s book and television movie "Fatal Vision" is waiting again to hear whether the legal system will believe him. A panel of the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va.
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | Special to The Times
Jeffrey R. MacDonald, whose murder case inspired the best-selling book "Fatal Vision," on Tuesday lost his bid for a new trial. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled unanimously that newly identified evidence raised by MacDonald's lawyers "neither supports MacDonald's account of the murders nor discredits the government's theory" of how the killings occurred. MacDonald's wife, Colette, and their two daughters were clubbed and stabbed to death on Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1987 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
The courtroom battle between convicted murderer Jeffrey R. MacDonald and "Fatal Vision" author Joe McGinniss ended in a mistrial Friday after a bitterly divided jury failed to reach a verdict on MacDonald's $15-million fraud claim against the writer. MacDonald, a former Army doctor convicted of killing his pregnant wife and two young daughters 17 years ago, accused McGinniss of duping him into cooperating on the book project by pretending to believe in MacDonald's innocence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1988
A $325,000 settlement for Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald, the former Green Beret physician convicted of killing his wife and two children, was at least temporarily delayed Friday by a Superior Court judge so that a hearing could be held on whether his slain wife's parents have a claim on the cash. MacDonald won the settlement last November in a breach-of-contract lawsuit against writer Joe McGinniss, who portrayed MacDonald as a killer in the book "Fatal Vision."
NEWS
October 20, 1990 | From Associated Press
Jeffrey MacDonald, the Green Beret doctor convicted more than 10 years ago of killing his wife and two daughters, deserves a new trial because of suppressed government evidence, his attorneys said Friday. Lawyer Harvey Silverglate said in court papers that private investigators turned up forensic notes and testimony about an alleged confession by a one-time suspect that could clear MacDonald.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1988
The Los Angeles federal court battle between "Fatal Vision" author Joe McGinniss and convicted killer Jeffrey MacDonald has ended with dismissal of a $15-million breach-of-contract suit. The dismissal comes under terms of a settlement giving $325,000 to MacDonald, who filed a breach-of-contract suit alleging that McGinniss betrayed him by becoming his friend and then writing a book that concluded that he killed his pregnant wife and two daughters at Ft. Bragg, N.C., in 1970.
NEWS
August 3, 1987 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Once they were friends, fervent believers in each other and the cause that united them. Today they sit on opposite sides of a federal courtroom in Los Angeles, divided by the contempt of knowing each other too well.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-two years later, Jeffrey R. MacDonald still insists that he didn't do it: He didn't stab and club to death his pregnant wife, Colette, and their two young daughters early in the morning of Feb. 17, 1970, at Ft. Bragg, N.C. MacDonald, a physician whose case was etched into the nation's consciousness with the 1980s book and television movie "Fatal Vision" is waiting again to hear whether the legal system will believe him. A panel of the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1989
Former Army doctor Jeffrey MacDonald, convicted of killing his wife and daughters, may keep only $50,000 of the $325,000 settlement he won in a dispute over a book about the killings, a judge ruled Tuesday. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Edward Ross deducted $92,000 from the remaining $275,000 to cover attorneys fees steming from MacDonald's lawsuit against "Fatal Vision" author Joe McGinniss.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1988
Jeffrey MacDonald, the former Green Beret doctor convicted of killing his wife and two daughters, Thursday rejected an offer by his former mother-in-law to settle a lawsuit over money he received from the author of a book on his life. Lawyers for MacDonald and Mildred Kassab met with Los Angeles Superior Court Judge R. William Schoettler Jr. in a closed conference but were unable to agree on a settlement.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1988 | PETER H. BROWN
Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald is locked in solitary confinement in Terminal Island Federal Prison at San Pedro. But MacDonald, convicted of the 1970 slayings of his wife and two small daughters, is hardly silent--or even alone. He's using his status as a celebrity convict to plead his innocence publicly via the airwaves. Petitioning for a new trial this winter (and due for a parole hearing in 1991), he's conducting a desperate series of interviews on TV and radio, albeit "with misgivings," he said.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Author Joe McGinniss testified Wednesday that he never let former Army physician Jeffrey MacDonald know that his book, "Fatal Vision," concluded that MacDonald was a murderer because he feared for his own family's safety. MacDonald was out of prison while appealing his 1979 conviction for killing his own family, and MacDonald's freedom made him "none too comfortable about my own wife and kids, in view of his background, if he were to find out what the book was going to say," McGinniss said.
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