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Jeffrey Runge

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AUTOS
August 27, 2003 | From Associated Press
One Saturday many years ago, while working in an emergency room, Dr. Jeffrey Runge had to tell parents that their two children died in an auto accident because they were not wearing seat belts. The next week, Runge treated two teenagers saved by seat belts when their vehicle plunged 30 feet into a construction pit. Auto safety became a second calling for Runge, now head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
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AUTOS
August 27, 2003 | From Associated Press
One Saturday many years ago, while working in an emergency room, Dr. Jeffrey Runge had to tell parents that their two children died in an auto accident because they were not wearing seat belts. The next week, Runge treated two teenagers saved by seat belts when their vehicle plunged 30 feet into a construction pit. Auto safety became a second calling for Runge, now head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
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BUSINESS
April 23, 2003 | John O'Dell
A quintet of automotive safety groups accused the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration of becoming a "toothless tiger" that was unwilling to properly perform its enforcement role in automotive safety investigations.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2003 | From Reuters
Regulators said they will launch crash tests and other reviews to determine whether tougher safety standards are needed for sport utility vehicles, pickups and minivans. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration promised a series of steps to address long-standing questions about SUV rollover risks and potential safety hazards of larger passenger vehicles sharing the road with cars.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2001 | Reuters
President Bush will nominate Jeffrey Runge, a North Carolina doctor trained in emergency medicine, as administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the White House said. Runge, if confirmed by the Senate, would be the fourth physician to serve as the nation's top auto-safety regulator. Runge is assistant chairman of emergency medicine at the Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte and is an expert in motor vehicle injury care and prevention.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | Associated Press
The government is backing away from its goal of getting 90% of Americans to wear seat belts by 2005, contending that the level set in the Clinton administration is too unrealistic. The new goal is 78% by 2003, compared with 87% envisioned under the Clinton plan. Federal regulators will decide after 2003 whether to set new goals. The Clinton administration's 10-year plan has proved too ambitious, Jeffrey W.
NATIONAL
November 28, 2004 | From Associated Press
The frequency of seat belt use increased in 37 states this year, a fact that federal highway safety officials attribute to greater awareness and police enforcement. Arizona and Hawaii achieved seat belt use rates of more than 95%, the highest ever reported, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said. The national seat belt use rate in 2004 was 80%, also an all-time high. Mississippi improved its seat belt use rate by 1.6% but still had the lowest rate in the nation at 63.2%.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2003 | From Reuters
U.S. automakers, led by General Motors Corp., have fired back at a federal proposal to raise fuel economy standards for trucks by 1.5 miles per gallon, claiming that regulators overestimated the ability of the companies to meet higher targets and that the costs of tougher rules outweigh the benefits.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nissan Motor Co., despite objections from the Michigan-based Big Three automakers, won a federal waiver Tuesday that allows the company to meet U.S. fuel economy requirements. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration accepted Nissan's argument that the company might have to cut U.S. jobs to comply with the so-called dual fleet rule. Nissan had said that without an exemption to the rule -- which imposes separate fuel economy standards on vehicles imported into the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2002 | From Associated Press
The country's top traffic safety official is urging auto makers to install new technologies that encourage motorists to wear seat belts. All vehicles sold in the United States must have a buzzer and dashboard light that reminds drivers to buckle up. Jeffrey Runge, administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, said Monday that auto makers should go further. Runge cited Ford Motor Co.'s new BeltMinder system.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2003 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
The number of traffic deaths rose last year to its highest level since 1990, the government said, citing a variety of factors, including rollover crashes, heavy drinking and a greater number of baby boomers climbing aboard motorcycles. An estimated 42,850 people -- 734 more than the previous year -- were killed in crashes nationwide in 2002, according to preliminary statistics released Wednesday by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
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