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Jeffrey S Wigand

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BUSINESS
January 27, 1996 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A onetime top scientist for Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. has testified that the company's former chairman lied under oath to Congress two years ago when he said he did not believe nicotine is addictive--an allegation that company lawyers spent Friday denying. The testimony of Jeffrey S. Wigand, the tobacco industry's highest-profile defector, is contained in a sealed deposition that was leaked to the Wall Street Journal and published Friday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1996 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The interview that was dead is alive again. CBS--which has been strongly criticized for not airing an interview with a former tobacco industry executive for fear of a multibillion-dollar lawsuit from the Brown & Williamson tobacco company--will air the interview this Sunday on "60 Minutes."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1996 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The interview that was dead is alive again. CBS--which has been strongly criticized for not airing an interview with a former tobacco industry executive for fear of a multibillion-dollar lawsuit from the Brown & Williamson tobacco company--will air the interview this Sunday on "60 Minutes."
BUSINESS
January 27, 1996 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A onetime top scientist for Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. has testified that the company's former chairman lied under oath to Congress two years ago when he said he did not believe nicotine is addictive--an allegation that company lawyers spent Friday denying. The testimony of Jeffrey S. Wigand, the tobacco industry's highest-profile defector, is contained in a sealed deposition that was leaked to the Wall Street Journal and published Friday.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Jeffrey S. Wigand has been temporarily muzzled by a Kentucky court from talking in public about his experiences at Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. But neither a restraining order nor an expensive public relations campaign waged against him is stunting Wigand's rise to prominence as one of the most visible, vocal critics of the cigarette industry.
NEWS
January 8, 1998 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The U.S. Justice Department, in the first criminal case resulting from its long investigation of the tobacco industry, accused an Oakland-based biotechnology company on Wednesday of conspiring with Brown & Williamson, the nation's third-largest cigarette maker, to create a tobacco plant with unusually high levels of nicotine. Department officials charged DNA Plant Technology, or DNAP, with cooperating with a U.S.
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