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Jeffrey Skilling

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BUSINESS
April 4, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Jeffrey Skilling, the former chief executive of defunct energy giant Enron Corp., could win early release from prison in a deal with the Justice Department, according to a report Thursday. CNBC said Skilling's attorneys and the Justice Department were discussing a deal, but that it was unclear how much his sentence could be shortened. Skilling, who was convicted on charges of conspiracy, fraud and insider trading, has been serving a 24-year sentence since 2006. Quiz: How well do you remember 2012?
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BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Former Enron Corp. Chief Executive Jeffrey Skilling could get a decade lopped off his prison sentence in a deal with the U.S. Justice Department. Skilling has spent more than six years in federal prison following his 2006 conviction in Enron's massive corporate fraud. The now-defunct company played a starring role in the energy crisis that swept through California and other Western states before Enron's epic implosion in 2001. Skilling challenged his 24-year sentence and, after a series of court rulings, struck a deal with federal prosecutors that would reduce his sentence to a range of 14 to 17.5 years, according to court documents filed by the Justice Department.
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OPINION
October 27, 2006
Re "Former Enron CEO gets 24-year sentence," Oct. 24 Here we have a convicted criminal who, even though claiming to be innocent, professes remorse. If a person is innocent of the charges, as Jeffrey Skilling claims to be, what's there to feel remorse about other than sorrow for being caught and exposed? Skilling has expressed not one iota of remorse for his role in the annihilation of the financial futures of thousands of families. True justice would be to strip Skilling of every penny he has and turn him out on the street with nowhere to live, no transportation, no cash and no credit cards.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Jeffrey Skilling, the former chief executive of defunct energy giant Enron Corp., could win early release from prison in a deal with the Justice Department, according to a report Thursday. CNBC said Skilling's attorneys and the Justice Department were discussing a deal, but that it was unclear how much his sentence could be shortened. Skilling, who was convicted on charges of conspiracy, fraud and insider trading, has been serving a 24-year sentence since 2006. Quiz: How well do you remember 2012?
OPINION
May 27, 2006
Re "Enron's Top Executives Are Convicted of Fraud," May 26 The continued denials of wrongdoing by Kenneth Lay and Jeffrey Skilling would be amusing if not so shameless. It just goes to prove that although justice may be blind, thankfully it is not deaf. Their lies under oath rang loud and clear to the jury. MARK S. ROTH Los Angeles Instead of sentencing Lay to some cushy prison for the rest of his life, take every cent he has away from him and give it back to those he stole from.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2001
How fitting that the sanctimonious Kenneth Lay, who arrogantly lectured California's electricity consumers this past spring on the "realities" of the deregulated 21st-century energy environment, has seen his company fall prey to that very same arrogance ["A Visionary Fallen From Grace," James Flanigan, Nov. 10]. While Californians allow themselves a wry smile over such news, the U.S. Justice Department should be building a case to "escort" Lay and his cohort Jeffrey Skilling to a prison cell for pocketing some $200 million from converting stock options at prices vastly over-inflated by their "cooking the books" at Enron over the last five years.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2001
It seems to me that malicious acts that result in mass confusion and a loss of confidence in America's ability to protect its citizens is called terrorism ["Enron's Trouble Could Spur Securities Reform," Nov. 25]. Except that the scale is smaller than the attack on New York, I view the actions of the tyrants running Enron as having exactly that effect on the company's employees, investors, and pensioners. Our president was quick to announce that he was freezing the assets of the "evil doers."
OPINION
June 24, 2010
Jeffrey Skilling is not an appealing character. As president and chief executive of the energy company Enron, he presided over years of unsavory business transactions and deceitful accounting gimmicks. When the company went bankrupt, leaving thousands of employees and shareholders in the lurch, Skilling was prosecuted, convicted and sentenced to 24 years in prison. But it is often the least sympathetic defendants who end up seeking and winning redress from the U.S. Supreme Court.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Former Enron Corp. Chief Executive Jeffrey Skilling could get a decade lopped off his prison sentence in a deal with the U.S. Justice Department. Skilling has spent more than six years in federal prison following his 2006 conviction in Enron's massive corporate fraud. The now-defunct company played a starring role in the energy crisis that swept through California and other Western states before Enron's epic implosion in 2001. Skilling challenged his 24-year sentence and, after a series of court rulings, struck a deal with federal prosecutors that would reduce his sentence to a range of 14 to 17.5 years, according to court documents filed by the Justice Department.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2010 | By David Savage and Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
The Supreme Court on Thursday made it much harder to prosecute corruption cases against public officials and corporate executives, ruling that a law used to help convict former Enron Corp. Chief Executive Jeffrey Skilling was far too broad. The decision narrowed but did not overturn a 1988 law that makes it a crime to scheme to deprive the public of their "right of honest services." All nine justices agreed that public officials and corporate executives cannot be convicted of defrauding the public unless they enriched themselves by taking a bribe or a kickback.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2013 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
Former Enron Chief Executive Jeffrey K. Skilling, who is serving a 24-year prison sentence for his part in the collapse of the energy giant, could win an early release under a possible deal with the Justice Department. Skilling was convicted in 2006 on 19 counts - including insider trading, conspiracy and securities fraud - and has served six years. During that time, his attorneys have tried several times to overturn his conviction. The Justice Department posted a notice on its website Thursday to notify victims of the Enron fraud and bankruptcy that prosecutors may resentence Skilling.
OPINION
June 24, 2010
Jeffrey Skilling is not an appealing character. As president and chief executive of the energy company Enron, he presided over years of unsavory business transactions and deceitful accounting gimmicks. When the company went bankrupt, leaving thousands of employees and shareholders in the lurch, Skilling was prosecuted, convicted and sentenced to 24 years in prison. But it is often the least sympathetic defendants who end up seeking and winning redress from the U.S. Supreme Court.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau
A Supreme Court ruling Thursday dealt a severe blow to legislation meant to fight public corruption and also could affect the recent convictions of former Enron chief Jeffrey Skilling and former newspaper magnate Conrad Black. In ruling on "honest-services fraud," the justices said Skilling and Black were wrongly convicted on that charge. All nine justices agreed that such fraud was too vague to constitute a crime unless a bribe or kickback was involved. But both men were convicted on other charges, and the Supreme Court sent their cases back to lower courts for further proceedings . Former Gov. Rod Blagojevich currently is being tried on multiple charges of corruption, including depriving the public of honest services.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2010 | By David Savage and Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
The Supreme Court on Thursday made it much harder to prosecute corruption cases against public officials and corporate executives, ruling that a law used to help convict former Enron Corp. Chief Executive Jeffrey Skilling was far too broad. The decision narrowed but did not overturn a 1988 law that makes it a crime to scheme to deprive the public of their "right of honest services." All nine justices agreed that public officials and corporate executives cannot be convicted of defrauding the public unless they enriched themselves by taking a bribe or a kickback.
OPINION
October 27, 2006
Re "Former Enron CEO gets 24-year sentence," Oct. 24 Here we have a convicted criminal who, even though claiming to be innocent, professes remorse. If a person is innocent of the charges, as Jeffrey Skilling claims to be, what's there to feel remorse about other than sorrow for being caught and exposed? Skilling has expressed not one iota of remorse for his role in the annihilation of the financial futures of thousands of families. True justice would be to strip Skilling of every penny he has and turn him out on the street with nowhere to live, no transportation, no cash and no credit cards.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2006 | Martin Zimmerman and Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writers
Former Enron Corp. Chief Executive Jeffrey K. Skilling was sentenced to more than 24 years in federal prison Monday for his role in the company's 2001 collapse, one of the longest prison terms to arise from the recent era of corporate scandals. Skilling, who was convicted in May on 19 counts of fraud, conspiracy, insider trading and lying to auditors, had faced 24 to 30 years in prison under federal sentencing guidelines. "Mr.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2006 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
There was an odd reversal of roles in the Enron Corp. trial Thursday: Defense lawyer Daniel M. Petrocelli labored to show that many of government witness Andrew S. Fastow's supposedly nefarious deals with Enron were legitimate, while Fastow clung doggedly to his guilt. The reason was that Fastow had earlier implicated Petrocelli's client, former Enron Chief Executive Jeffrey K.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2006 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
It used to bother Ken Horton that his fellow former Enron Corp. employees weren't as upset as he was about what had happened to them. "It almost made me angry that they seemed so laid back," said Horton, 42, a finance whiz who worked in Enron's risk management operation. Along with about 4,000 co-workers, he lost his job and retirement savings when the company collapsed in a financial scandal.
OPINION
May 27, 2006
Re "Enron's Top Executives Are Convicted of Fraud," May 26 The continued denials of wrongdoing by Kenneth Lay and Jeffrey Skilling would be amusing if not so shameless. It just goes to prove that although justice may be blind, thankfully it is not deaf. Their lies under oath rang loud and clear to the jury. MARK S. ROTH Los Angeles Instead of sentencing Lay to some cushy prison for the rest of his life, take every cent he has away from him and give it back to those he stole from.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2006 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
Handing the government its biggest victory in its war on corporate corruption, a federal jury Thursday found former Enron Corp. executives Kenneth L. Lay and Jeffrey K. Skilling guilty of conspiracy and fraud in connection with the 2001 collapse of the onetime energy trading giant. Jurors said they rejected the defense that there was no crime at Enron -- that Lay and Skilling were unfairly targeted by a government bent on making them the scapegoats for their company's failure.
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