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Jeffrey Tate

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1989 | JOHN HENKEN
Friday was not a night at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion for the faint of heart or posterior. Or the impatient. British conductor Jeffrey Tate made his Los Angeles Philharmonic debut with a program emphasizing the musical grand and grandiose in some of their most familiar manifestations. Wonderful to say, he brought fresh interest and life to Beethoven's "Emperor" Concerto and Schubert's "Great" C-major Symphony.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2005 | Daniel Cariaga, Special to The Times
British conductor Jeffrey Tate brought the perfect combination of substance and lightness to his second program with the Los Angeles Philharmonic in the Hollywood Bowl this week: Ravel's "Mother Goose" Suite and Piano Concerto in G, paired with Edward Elgar's ever-provocative "Enigma" Variations. On Thursday, this agenda resonated neatly and was performed persuasively by the orchestra, which usually responds carefully to this guest conductor's gentle coaxing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1988 | HERBERT GLASS
The air was chilly outside Ambassador Auditorium, Pasadena, and within as well, where the English Chamber Orchestra presented the first of its three UK/LA '88 Festival-related concerts on Thursday. The indoors chill related to the orchestra's playing: balanced and tuned to a fault under its principal conductor, Jeffrey Tate, who was making his local debut.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Goliaths of the symphonic repertory, Brahms' D-minor Piano Concerto and Richard Strauss' swollen "Ein Heldenleben" are bigger-than-life pieces that probably don't belong on the same program. Yet there they are, this week, together on the agenda of the Los Angeles Philharmonic's two performances led by guest conductor Jeffrey Tate. In the performance Thursday night in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, the diminished impact of each made the programming problem innocuous.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Goliaths of the symphonic repertory, Brahms' D-minor Piano Concerto and Richard Strauss' swollen "Ein Heldenleben" are bigger-than-life pieces that probably don't belong on the same program. Yet there they are, this week, together on the agenda of the Los Angeles Philharmonic's two performances led by guest conductor Jeffrey Tate. In the performance Thursday night in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, the diminished impact of each made the programming problem innocuous.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2005 | Daniel Cariaga, Special to The Times
British conductor Jeffrey Tate brought the perfect combination of substance and lightness to his second program with the Los Angeles Philharmonic in the Hollywood Bowl this week: Ravel's "Mother Goose" Suite and Piano Concerto in G, paired with Edward Elgar's ever-provocative "Enigma" Variations. On Thursday, this agenda resonated neatly and was performed persuasively by the orchestra, which usually responds carefully to this guest conductor's gentle coaxing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1996 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Chameleon-like, the Los Angeles Philharmonic changes its styles according to present needs. A week ago, it was a German orchestra, playing Wagner and Richard Strauss under an expert in that repertory. Friday night and over the weekend in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, our symphonic ensemble played Britten, Dvorak and Elgar in a contrasting manner, as idiomatically as one might wish.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1998 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Perhaps his "Star-Spangled Banner" pressed too hard and too fast, perhaps his "Meistersinger" Prelude remained plodding and earthbound through its length. But when Jeffrey Tate and the Los Angeles Philharmonic got to Brahms' Third Symphony Thursday night at the Hollywood Bowl, all was well: transparent and buoyant. This resplendent performance proved an antidote to the orchestra's uninspired reading, last November in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, under Roger Norrington.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
After making New York City--and the Metropolitan Opera--his headquarters for most of the last decade, British conductor Jeffrey Tate last year moved back to London to assume his job with English Chamber Orchestra and a similar post, also principal conductor, with the Royal Opera, Covent Garden. "It has been good to get back home," the 44-year-old former opera coach said recently in a telephone interview from a Richmond, Va., tour stop.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1998 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Perhaps his "Star-Spangled Banner" pressed too hard and too fast, perhaps his "Meistersinger" Prelude remained plodding and earthbound through its length. But when Jeffrey Tate and the Los Angeles Philharmonic got to Brahms' Third Symphony Thursday night at the Hollywood Bowl, all was well: transparent and buoyant. This resplendent performance proved an antidote to the orchestra's uninspired reading, last November in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, under Roger Norrington.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Last week at the Hollywood Bowl, the hyperkinetic British conductor Roger Norrington performed Mahler and Beethoven like a house on fire. Tuesday night, another well-known British maestro offered an antidote. It is unfair to Jeffrey Tate to think him poky, but he was evidently in an expansive mood with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. There are many kinds of slow.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1996 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Chameleon-like, the Los Angeles Philharmonic changes its styles according to present needs. A week ago, it was a German orchestra, playing Wagner and Richard Strauss under an expert in that repertory. Friday night and over the weekend in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, our symphonic ensemble played Britten, Dvorak and Elgar in a contrasting manner, as idiomatically as one might wish.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1994 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Pity the poor guest conductor. He--or, all-too-occasionally, she--pops into town for a one-week stand with an unfamiliar, probably tired, possibly blase orchestra marking time until the regular boss comes home. The first challenge is to turn two or three meager rehearsals into something more than get-acquainted sessions. Then come the concerts, and just as some sort of rapport begins to loom on the aesthetic horizon, it is time to move on.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1990 | WALTER PRICE
As pure sound, the creamy, sumptuous voice of Kiri Te Kanawa is a consistent source of pleasure. She has no technical problems and even sports a decent trill. Here, as usual, she reveals little emotional involvement. Her French is as muddy as her Italian has been, making her reading of the original-text "Don Carlos" aria beside the point. That she can ignore the wrenching music and words of Berlioz' Marguerite aria, for example, making it little more than a vocalise, is cause for amazement.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1987 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Staff Writer
A graceless, hard-driven new Metropolitan Opera production of Johann Strauss' comic opera "Die Fledermaus" both ended the old year (on Channels 50, 15 and 24 Wednesday) and inaugurated the new one (on Channel 28 Thursday) courtesy of PBS' "Live From the Met" series. Spoken in English and sung in German (with subtitles for TV), Otto Schenk's gauche, heavyhanded staging spilled and sloshed and sprayed more water on the participants than any other project since "The Poseidon Adventure."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1994 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Pity the poor guest conductor. He--or, all-too-occasionally, she--pops into town for a one-week stand with an unfamiliar, probably tired, possibly blase orchestra marking time until the regular boss comes home. The first challenge is to turn two or three meager rehearsals into something more than get-acquainted sessions. Then come the concerts, and just as some sort of rapport begins to loom on the aesthetic horizon, it is time to move on.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1989 | JOHN HENKEN
Friday was not a night at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion for the faint of heart or posterior. Or the impatient. British conductor Jeffrey Tate made his Los Angeles Philharmonic debut with a program emphasizing the musical grand and grandiose in some of their most familiar manifestations. Wonderful to say, he brought fresh interest and life to Beethoven's "Emperor" Concerto and Schubert's "Great" C-major Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1988 | HERBERT GLASS
The air was chilly outside Ambassador Auditorium, Pasadena, and within as well, where the English Chamber Orchestra presented the first of its three UK/LA '88 Festival-related concerts on Thursday. The indoors chill related to the orchestra's playing: balanced and tuned to a fault under its principal conductor, Jeffrey Tate, who was making his local debut.
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