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Jeffrey Toobin

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September 8, 1996 | Bella Stumbo, Bella Stumbo is the author of "Until the Twelfth of Never: The Deadly Divorce of Dan and Betty Broderick" (Pocket Books, 1993)
It's been a rough summer for O.J. junkies like myself, and not only because of this new judge, who seems hellbent on depriving us of any fresh goodies from the upcoming Simpson civil trial. In my opinion, an even more ominous sign that our seemingly endless supply of Simpson news, gossip and garbage may be about to dry up came last month, when Joe McGinniss cut us off.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2007 | David J. Garrow, Special to The Times
In recent years the annual workload of the U.S. Supreme Court has shrunk further and further. In the 1980s, the court was hearing and deciding as many as 175 cases a year; in its two most recent terms the totals have dropped to 82 and now a century-long low of 68. The justices insist that the shrinkage is not intentional, and legal scholars cite a bevy of reasons, such as fewer disagreements among lower courts, for the reduced numbers.
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BOOKS
March 12, 2000
To the Editor: In his review of Jeffrey Toobin's book, "A Vast Conspiracy" (Book Review, Feb. 20), Stanley Kutler describes me as a "sour, churlish" journalist who "hated" Bill Clinton and was obligingly manipulated by the president's enemies during the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Since I have never met Kutler, I can only assume he has chosen to accept as accurate the almost comically crude account of my reporting in Toobin's book. That being the case, I thought both Kutler and your readers might be interested in the following: One, though Toobin repeatedly insinuates that I was used to "launder" false charges against the president, he is unable to cite a single factual mistake in any of my many articles in Newsweek--a body of work which last year was awarded the National Magazine Award for editorial excellence in reporting, as well as a host of other journalism prizes; two, Toobin's own reporting, by contrast, is so riddled with sloppy errors and grotesque distortions that it recently prompted Newsweek managing editor Ann McDaniel to fire off a scathing protest to his publisher, Random House; three, upon receipt of McDaniel's letter, Random House pledged to retract one of Toobin's principal accusations against me--that I acted to "protect Ken Starr's investigation"--from all future editions of "A Vast Conspiracy"; and four, Toobin himself recently acknowledged to the Washington Post that "perhaps" he was negligent in failing to disclose a rather pertinent historical...
BOOKS
March 12, 2000
To the Editor: In his review of Jeffrey Toobin's book, "A Vast Conspiracy" (Book Review, Feb. 20), Stanley Kutler describes me as a "sour, churlish" journalist who "hated" Bill Clinton and was obligingly manipulated by the president's enemies during the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Since I have never met Kutler, I can only assume he has chosen to accept as accurate the almost comically crude account of my reporting in Toobin's book. That being the case, I thought both Kutler and your readers might be interested in the following: One, though Toobin repeatedly insinuates that I was used to "launder" false charges against the president, he is unable to cite a single factual mistake in any of my many articles in Newsweek--a body of work which last year was awarded the National Magazine Award for editorial excellence in reporting, as well as a host of other journalism prizes; two, Toobin's own reporting, by contrast, is so riddled with sloppy errors and grotesque distortions that it recently prompted Newsweek managing editor Ann McDaniel to fire off a scathing protest to his publisher, Random House; three, upon receipt of McDaniel's letter, Random House pledged to retract one of Toobin's principal accusations against me--that I acted to "protect Ken Starr's investigation"--from all future editions of "A Vast Conspiracy"; and four, Toobin himself recently acknowledged to the Washington Post that "perhaps" he was negligent in failing to disclose a rather pertinent historical...
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Aug. 8, 1974, Jeffrey Toobin watched Richard M. Nixon announce his resignation from the presidency on television and drank his first glass of champagne. Barely 14, he had just discovered a new group of heroes--the men and women who successfully prosecuted the Watergate case. The child of liberal parents, Toobin says he was moved by the triumph of "good over evil" in that scandal and hoped that one day he could go on the same kind of legal crusade. Less than 13 years later, he got his chance.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2007 | David J. Garrow, Special to The Times
In recent years the annual workload of the U.S. Supreme Court has shrunk further and further. In the 1980s, the court was hearing and deciding as many as 175 cases a year; in its two most recent terms the totals have dropped to 82 and now a century-long low of 68. The justices insist that the shrinkage is not intentional, and legal scholars cite a bevy of reasons, such as fewer disagreements among lower courts, for the reduced numbers.
BOOKS
February 20, 2000 | STANLEY I. KUTLER, Stanley I. Kutler is the author of "The Wars of Watergate" and "Abuse of Power: The New Nixon Tapes."
One year ago, the Senate voted to reject the impeachment charges against President William Jefferson Clinton. The senators found no high crimes and misdemeanors, no lofty crimes against the state and no damage to the republic, at least by the president. Now, with hindsight and solid research, Jeffrey Toobin has marshaled the evidence and connected the dots: The whole business, he maintains, was about sex and a vast conspiracy to humiliate and eventually destroy the president.
BOOKS
March 3, 1991 | Scott Turow, Turow, a former assistant United States attorney, practices law in Chicago. He is the author of "Presumed Innocent" and "The Burden of Proof," both novels
Like some comet crossing the sky with its tail of flame, this book by a junior member of the special prosecutor's team involved in the investigation and trial of Lt. Col. Oliver North comes to us trailing the fire of ongoing controversy concerning its creation. When Jeffrey Toobin, a recent graduate of Harvard Law School now a federal prosecutor in Brooklyn, submitted his manuscript for clearance to his former superiors, the Office of Independent Counsel Lawrence E.
NEWS
June 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Friends of President Clinton believe he will run for the Senate from Arkansas in 2002, New Yorker magazine reported. Writer Jeffrey Toobin said that "over the past several weeks, some old friends of the first family have been talking" about another Senate race besides First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton's widely expected campaign to succeed New York Democratic Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan.
OPINION
July 24, 2005
Who would President Bush pick to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor? Appellate Judge John G. Roberts Jr. was anything but a safe guess as the president faced enormous pressure to appoint a woman, a Latino or at least someone with long judicial experience. (No less than Laura Bush told NBC on July 12, "I would really like for him to name another woman," and appellate judges Edith Jones and Edith Brown Clement were reportedly in the running.
BOOKS
February 20, 2000 | STANLEY I. KUTLER, Stanley I. Kutler is the author of "The Wars of Watergate" and "Abuse of Power: The New Nixon Tapes."
One year ago, the Senate voted to reject the impeachment charges against President William Jefferson Clinton. The senators found no high crimes and misdemeanors, no lofty crimes against the state and no damage to the republic, at least by the president. Now, with hindsight and solid research, Jeffrey Toobin has marshaled the evidence and connected the dots: The whole business, he maintains, was about sex and a vast conspiracy to humiliate and eventually destroy the president.
BOOKS
September 8, 1996 | Bella Stumbo, Bella Stumbo is the author of "Until the Twelfth of Never: The Deadly Divorce of Dan and Betty Broderick" (Pocket Books, 1993)
It's been a rough summer for O.J. junkies like myself, and not only because of this new judge, who seems hellbent on depriving us of any fresh goodies from the upcoming Simpson civil trial. In my opinion, an even more ominous sign that our seemingly endless supply of Simpson news, gossip and garbage may be about to dry up came last month, when Joe McGinniss cut us off.
BOOKS
March 3, 1991 | Scott Turow, Turow, a former assistant United States attorney, practices law in Chicago. He is the author of "Presumed Innocent" and "The Burden of Proof," both novels
Like some comet crossing the sky with its tail of flame, this book by a junior member of the special prosecutor's team involved in the investigation and trial of Lt. Col. Oliver North comes to us trailing the fire of ongoing controversy concerning its creation. When Jeffrey Toobin, a recent graduate of Harvard Law School now a federal prosecutor in Brooklyn, submitted his manuscript for clearance to his former superiors, the Office of Independent Counsel Lawrence E.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Aug. 8, 1974, Jeffrey Toobin watched Richard M. Nixon announce his resignation from the presidency on television and drank his first glass of champagne. Barely 14, he had just discovered a new group of heroes--the men and women who successfully prosecuted the Watergate case. The child of liberal parents, Toobin says he was moved by the triumph of "good over evil" in that scandal and hoped that one day he could go on the same kind of legal crusade. Less than 13 years later, he got his chance.
BOOKS
September 16, 2007
Brad DeLong reviews "The Age of Turbulence: Adventures in a New World," by Alan Greenspan. David R. Garrow reviews "The Nine: Inside the Secret World of the Supreme Court," by Jeffrey Toobin. Tim Rutten reviews "The Terror Presidency: Law and Judgment Inside the Bush Administration," by Jack Goldsmith. The following reviews are scheduled: Jesse Cohen reviews "Apollo's Fire: A Day on Earth in Nature and Imagination," by Michael Sims. Christopher Reynolds reviews "Matecumbe," a novel by James A.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1995
The lawyer for Los Angeles Police Detective Mark Fuhrman, who earlier this week filed a $50-million libel action against New Yorker magazine, on Friday amended that complaint to include O.J. Simpson attorney Robert L. Shapiro as a defendant. Robert H. Tourtelot, the attorney for Fuhrman, said his decision to name Shapiro as a defendant was made after he received information linking the defense lawyer to a meeting with New Yorker writer Jeffrey Toobin in July, 1994.
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