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Jeffrey Vallance

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2008 | Paul Young
In 1978, at age 23, Jeffrey Vallance bought a whole chicken at Ralphs, named it Blinky and buried it at Los Angeles Pet Memorial Park with a funeral service and gravestone. Since then, that same performance art piece has grown beyond Vallance's wildest expectations. On the 10th anniversary, Vallance hired a lawyer, doctor and scientist to conduct an exhumation. And on the 20th, university students attempted to start a Blinky festival with tributes, honors and, of course, merchandise. Now, beginning Saturday, the Track 16 Gallery is hosting a 30th anniversary, which includes a Vallance-designed chapel-reliquary, relics and five contiguous Vallance-curated solo exhibitions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
When John Baldessari was looking for an L.A. gallery to show his work 20 years ago, he narrowed his choice to three and ultimately chose Margo Leavin. "I thought she would be around for a long time," he said. "And it turned out to be true. " For more than four decades, Leavin has occupied a prominent perch in the Los Angeles contemporary art scene. Her gallery, which opened in 1970, is one of the most enduring and recognizable in the city, with a roster of top-tier artists that includes Jeffrey Vallance, Alexis Smith and William Leavitt as well as Baldessari.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the Santa Monica Museum of Art, "The World of Jeffrey Vallance" presents a picture of suburban American culture that's a lot like the real thing. Both are banal--and unashamed of being mundane. Vallance's homemade souvenirs and wacky documentations of trips to Iceland, Tonga, the Vatican, Samoa, Mexico City and Canoga Park are a testament to the resonance of the everyday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2008 | Paul Young
In 1978, at age 23, Jeffrey Vallance bought a whole chicken at Ralphs, named it Blinky and buried it at Los Angeles Pet Memorial Park with a funeral service and gravestone. Since then, that same performance art piece has grown beyond Vallance's wildest expectations. On the 10th anniversary, Vallance hired a lawyer, doctor and scientist to conduct an exhumation. And on the 20th, university students attempted to start a Blinky festival with tributes, honors and, of course, merchandise. Now, beginning Saturday, the Track 16 Gallery is hosting a 30th anniversary, which includes a Vallance-designed chapel-reliquary, relics and five contiguous Vallance-curated solo exhibitions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1995 | Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is chair of the department of liberal arts and sciences at Otis College of Art and Design
Many an American youth read "Kon- Tiki" with wide-eyed curiosity. Thor Heyerdahl's account of his open-raft journey to the South Pacific is prime adolescent stuff. But few have been as inclined to act out the promise of adventure as artist Jeffrey Vallance has. Some 20 years later, still inspired by Heyerdahl, Vallance began a series of trips to exotic and remote lands.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1994 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Scripps College in Claremont has opened the Millard Sheets Art Center, a new fine-arts complex that boasts a museum-quality gallery and state-of-the-art studios for photography, computer art and the traditional disciplines. The facility's public centerpiece is the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, a 4,000-square-foot exhibition space directed by Mary MacNaughton. The exhibition program will focus on the college's art holdings, MacNaughton says.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2007 | PAUL YOUNG
I first heard about Jeffrey Vallance in 1988, when he exhumed the remains of a chicken from a pet cemetery. Vallance had buried the bird, which he dubbed Blinky, 10 years earlier with a complete service, even though it actually came from the meat department at Ralphs -- bag and all. It was a prank, of course, but he took it very seriously. During the exhumation, he had professionals determine the cause of Blinky's death. I've been a fan ever since.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2012 | By David Ng, Los Angeles Times
When John Baldessari was looking for an L.A. gallery to show his work 20 years ago, he narrowed his choice to three and ultimately chose Margo Leavin. "I thought she would be around for a long time," he said. "And it turned out to be true. " For more than four decades, Leavin has occupied a prominent perch in the Los Angeles contemporary art scene. Her gallery, which opened in 1970, is one of the most enduring and recognizable in the city, with a roster of top-tier artists that includes Jeffrey Vallance, Alexis Smith and William Leavitt as well as Baldessari.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
There are flaky sidewalk-style portraits of a corpulent dark man in a braided military officer's hat and dark glasses. The very model of a Third World strongman. There are blond girls with shiny red lips, almond eyes and cute flat noses surrounded by coats of arms dedicated to everything from happy faces to 7-Eleven stores to body-shop pinups.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1993
Jeffrey Vallance's latest exhibition is a mock miniature museum that doubles as a dubious religious shrine and an earnest research project. Installed at Rosamund Felsen Gallery, "Three's a Shroud" ranks among his most impressive and hilarious works. It is incisively intelligent and wickedly funny, plainly matter-of-fact and utterly preposterous.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2007 | PAUL YOUNG
I first heard about Jeffrey Vallance in 1988, when he exhumed the remains of a chicken from a pet cemetery. Vallance had buried the bird, which he dubbed Blinky, 10 years earlier with a complete service, even though it actually came from the meat department at Ralphs -- bag and all. It was a prank, of course, but he took it very seriously. During the exhumation, he had professionals determine the cause of Blinky's death. I've been a fan ever since.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2005 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
"Monuments for the USA" is an exhibition that was partly motivated out of sincere -- and perhaps even severe -- distress. In the Logan Galleries at California College of the Arts' Wattis Institute, 61 proposals are on view for monuments to important aspects of American society today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1995 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monet had the French village of Giverny. Gauguin had Tahiti. And Jeffrey Vallance has the Valley. Other artists have painted the Valley. California Impressionist William Wendt recorded what it looked like before the tract houses blossomed and the malls rose up. And Edward Biberman produced a marvelous painting of an unlikely Valley subject--the Sepulveda Dam--now owned by a wealthy Encino collector.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the Santa Monica Museum of Art, "The World of Jeffrey Vallance" presents a picture of suburban American culture that's a lot like the real thing. Both are banal--and unashamed of being mundane. Vallance's homemade souvenirs and wacky documentations of trips to Iceland, Tonga, the Vatican, Samoa, Mexico City and Canoga Park are a testament to the resonance of the everyday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1995 | Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is chair of the department of liberal arts and sciences at Otis College of Art and Design
Many an American youth read "Kon- Tiki" with wide-eyed curiosity. Thor Heyerdahl's account of his open-raft journey to the South Pacific is prime adolescent stuff. But few have been as inclined to act out the promise of adventure as artist Jeffrey Vallance has. Some 20 years later, still inspired by Heyerdahl, Vallance began a series of trips to exotic and remote lands.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1994 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Scripps College in Claremont has opened the Millard Sheets Art Center, a new fine-arts complex that boasts a museum-quality gallery and state-of-the-art studios for photography, computer art and the traditional disciplines. The facility's public centerpiece is the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, a 4,000-square-foot exhibition space directed by Mary MacNaughton. The exhibition program will focus on the college's art holdings, MacNaughton says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1995 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monet had the French village of Giverny. Gauguin had Tahiti. And Jeffrey Vallance has the Valley. Other artists have painted the Valley. California Impressionist William Wendt recorded what it looked like before the tract houses blossomed and the malls rose up. And Edward Biberman produced a marvelous painting of an unlikely Valley subject--the Sepulveda Dam--now owned by a wealthy Encino collector.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2005 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
"Monuments for the USA" is an exhibition that was partly motivated out of sincere -- and perhaps even severe -- distress. In the Logan Galleries at California College of the Arts' Wattis Institute, 61 proposals are on view for monuments to important aspects of American society today.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1993
Jeffrey Vallance's latest exhibition is a mock miniature museum that doubles as a dubious religious shrine and an earnest research project. Installed at Rosamund Felsen Gallery, "Three's a Shroud" ranks among his most impressive and hilarious works. It is incisively intelligent and wickedly funny, plainly matter-of-fact and utterly preposterous.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
There are flaky sidewalk-style portraits of a corpulent dark man in a braided military officer's hat and dark glasses. The very model of a Third World strongman. There are blond girls with shiny red lips, almond eyes and cute flat noses surrounded by coats of arms dedicated to everything from happy faces to 7-Eleven stores to body-shop pinups.
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