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Jeffrey Vallance

ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic
"As members of a democratic society we should regard monuments with a certain amount of suspicion," curator Ralph Rugoff writes in the catalog of his latest exhibition at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco. "They unambiguously assert that this leader was heroic, these fallen soldiers were patriots, this event should never be forgotten. Built to endure, they present a particular vision of history as though it were an inarguable and eternal truth." Rugoff decided to fight back.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Los Angeles will get its first in-depth look at contemporary Czechoslovakian art this summer at Otis Art Institute of Parsons School of Design. Dialogue/Prague/Los Angeles, an exhibition of works by 12 Czech artists, will be at the Otis/Parsons gallery from June 29 to Aug. 18. An auxiliary show pairing Czech and American art is expected to take place concurrently in another local exhibition space. The Los Angeles event is the second half of an exchange that debuted last August in Prague.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
L.A. has grown familiar with the powerful conceptual work of Jeffrey Vallance and his sojourns to Iceland and the island of Tonga in the South Pacific. Now he presents his second installation of objects and collages made during a visit to the king of Tonga. From Vallance we learn that that 460-pound gentleman and scholar not only rules a happy, orderly island but is a lawyer, anthropologist, surfer and musician.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1996 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the wall text for "Dogs in Form and Image," at the Golden West College Fine Arts Gallery through Friday, gallery director Donna Sandrock writes that images of pets can be an artist's "most personal or 'covert' work." The show itself is amply stocked with garden-variety paintings of canines that appeal more to dog lovers than contemporary-art hounds. But there are a few pieces by well-known artists who have other matters in mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Facts and Figures: Selections From the Lannan Foundation Collection" is a rich, stimulating exhibition in which numbers don't add up and facts never speak for themselves. Inspiring profound doubt, this 14-artist show also invites poetic license. As viewers are called upon to interpret its 45 representational images, subjective impulses intermingle with mute objectivity, charging the installation with psychological complexity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2002
Photography Peter Fetterman Bergamot Station A-7, 2525 Michigan Ave., Santa Monica, (310) 453-6463 Classic black-and-white humanist imagery. Jan Kesner 164 N. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles, (323) 938-6834 Twentieth century masterworks and contemporary photo-based art. Paul Kopeikin 138 N. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles, (323) 937-0765 Vintage and contemporary fine art photography. Craig Krull Bergamot Station B-3, 2525 Michigan Ave.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1988 | KEVIN ALLMAN
As a record producer, Brian Eno has worked with U2 and Talking Heads, and as a composer he has released 11 solo albums of textured, experimental sounds, some written to be heard in specific locations ("Music for Airports"). He has also created more than 50 gallery shows incorporating his "ambient music" and video work. His latest production of "video paintings" has been installed at the Santa Monica Museum of Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Los Angeles artist Carlos Almaraz died of AIDS in 1989 at age 48, leaving behind his wife, Elsa, and a daughter, Maya. He's buried in the cemetery on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, where he sojourned in late years. The grave is marked with a monument designed by fellow artist Jeffrey Vallance. Almaraz's epitaph reads, "Here lies a chap quick as a cat and short one life." The artist was also a poet with a tough sense of humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Staff Writer
The condition of black and white in art means more than a lack of color. It can signal purity, restraint and rigor--aesthetic issues with moral overtones. In formal terms, black and white provides the ultimate contrast. Conceptually, it's a clear way of getting back to basics or developing an idea without seductive cosmetics. Though presumed austere, black-and-white art also has its own beauty and an expressive range that rivals that of a color wheel.
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