Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJeffrey Wigand
IN THE NEWS

Jeffrey Wigand

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 17, 1996 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brown & Williamson lawyers confronting tobacco whistle-blower Jeffrey Wigand at his deposition Tuesday produced records suggesting that work on a safer cigarette was sidetracked by technical problems rather than by legal concerns as Wigand has claimed. Wigand, formerly B&W's vice president for research and development and the highest-ranking defector in the history of the tobacco industry, is undergoing exhaustive questioning by B&W in its lawsuit accusing him of fraud and breach of contract.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2013 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ronald L. Motley, a crusading plaintiff's lawyer who took on the asbestos industry before targeting tobacco companies in a landmark victory for the anti-smoking movement that brought the biggest civil settlement in U.S. history, died Thursday in Charleston, S.C. He was 68. The cause was complications from organ failure, said Don Migliori, a partner in his law firm. In the 1990s Motley pioneered the development of mass-tort litigation to sue tobacco makers and companies that sold asbestos-laden building products.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1999 | Howard Rosenberg / TELEVISION
That praised new movie, "The Insider," has more layers than lasagna. On top is a moving, pulsating, even scary fact-shaped story about good--in the persons of Al Pacino as former "60 Minutes" segment producer Lowell Bergman and Russell Crowe as whistle-blower Jeffrey Wigand--versus the evil of Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co. and censoring corporate brigands at CBS.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By Celine Wright
Does the story of Edward Snowden not scream political thriller? The 29-year-old analyst disappeared from his Hong Kong hotel room a day after his identity was revealed as the person responsible for leaking secrets about U.S. government surveillance programs.  In his 12-minute video interview with the Guardian's Glenn Greenwald, Snowden said the CIA could grab him at any moment or pay off a Chinese triad to kill him. PHOTOS: Famous document-leakers...
BUSINESS
November 23, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Defendant to Challenge Brown & Williamson Order: Richard Scruggs, the attorney for former Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. executive Jeffrey Wigand, said he will ask a Kentucky judge to revoke a temporary restraining order that bans Wigand from talking about research into the ill effects of tobacco. At issue is a confidentiality contract Wigand signed when he left the Louisville-based tobacco company in 1993.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tobacco Whistle-Blower Gives Deposition: Jeffrey Wigand, who is said to have "devastating" inside information, fielded questions from lawyers for the state of Mississippi and the Justice Department, despite his former employer's effort to silence him.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
Brown & Williamson Corp. lost its latest effort to depose staffers at Westinghouse Electric Corp.'s CBS network in the cigarette maker's case against a former employee. A New York state judge ruled in February that Brown & Williamson failed to show that subpoenas for CBS testimony were crucial to its case against Jeffrey Wigand, B&W's former head of research. B&W appealed. The appellate division on Thursday denied the Louisville, Ky.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
CBS Moves to Quash Brown & Williamson Subpoenas: Westinghouse Electric Corp.'s television network won a protective order in New York State Supreme Court delaying the depositions, which were to begin today, at least until a hearing Thursday, when a judge will consider quashing the subpoenas for testimony from Mike Wallace and other employees. Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp., a Louisville, Ky.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Canadian government said it has hired Jeffrey Wigand, the man who blew the whistle on the U.S. tobacco industry and inspired the movie "The Insider," as a special health consultant on national tobacco policies. Wigand is a former vice president and head of research for U.S. tobacco company Brown & Williamson, a unit of British American Tobacco. "The Insider" is based in part on his struggle several years ago to reveal the inside workings of the industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1996 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'60 Minutes' Update: Sunday night's long-delayed "60 Minutes" interview with former tobacco-industry executive Jeffrey Wigand will include Wigand's response to allegations about his personal history made against him in a 500-page "dossier" released to the press by Brown & Williamson Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2012 | Meg James
The death of CBS News' pit-bull reporter Mike Wallace marks not only the passing of a broadcast lion but in many ways also the brand of journalism he helped to define. Wallace, 93, died late Saturday at a care center in New Canaan, Conn., where he had been staying for the last few years. CBS plans an hourlong tribute to Wallace and his career on "60 Minutes" next Sunday. In announcing his death, CBS lauded the brazen tactics that it said had made Wallace a household name "synonymous with the tough interview -- a style he practically invented for television more than half a century ago. " "All of us at CBS News and particularly at '60 Minutes' owe so much to Mike," Jeff Fager, chairman of CBS News and a longtime executive producer of "60 Minutes," said in a statement released Sunday.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2000 | Associated Press
Whistleblower Jeffrey Wigand testified that cigarette maker Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. systematically altered and destroyed any internal document during the early 1990s that contradicted the industry's public "mantra" that cigarettes had not been proved to cause cancer. The testimony in a Brooklyn federal court came in a high-stakes civil case matching a trust for sick asbestos workers and their heirs against B&W, a unit of British American Tobacco and other tobacco giants.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1999 | MICHAEL MANN and ERIC ROTH, Michael Mann directed "The Insider"; Eric Roth and he wrote the screenplay
It's interesting that print journalists, who have independence at stake, are repeating the distortions of a smear campaign against "The Insider." If the writers of "Smoke Lingers as 'The Insider' Does a Slow Burn" (Dec. 3, by Paul Lieberman and Myron Levin) had been in the crisis at "60 Minutes" in 1995, there's little doubt which way they'd have gone. They are not Lowell Bergman.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Canadian government said it has hired Jeffrey Wigand, the man who blew the whistle on the U.S. tobacco industry and inspired the movie "The Insider," as a special health consultant on national tobacco policies. Wigand is a former vice president and head of research for U.S. tobacco company Brown & Williamson, a unit of British American Tobacco. "The Insider" is based in part on his struggle several years ago to reveal the inside workings of the industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1999 | Howard Rosenberg / TELEVISION
That praised new movie, "The Insider," has more layers than lasagna. On top is a moving, pulsating, even scary fact-shaped story about good--in the persons of Al Pacino as former "60 Minutes" segment producer Lowell Bergman and Russell Crowe as whistle-blower Jeffrey Wigand--versus the evil of Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co. and censoring corporate brigands at CBS.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Unlikely material can inspire exceptional films: witness "The Insider." What could sound less promising than the legal fuss surrounding one man's indecision about telling what he knows about cigarettes, unless it's the internal wranglings of a television network's news division? But it is the triumph of this Michael Mann-directed film that those iffy scenarios result in a compelling drama, as notable for the importance of what it has to say as for the riveting skill with which it's said.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1996 | From Associated Press
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. received permission Monday to seek sworn depositions from "60 Minutes" correspondent Mike Wallace and other CBS employees who interviewed whistle-blower Jeffrey Wigand. Lawyers for the Louisville, Ky.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1999 | KATHLEEN CRAUGHWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the reception immediately following the premiere screening of "The Insider"--writer-director Michael Mann's movie about tobacco company executive turned whistle-blower Jeffrey Wigand--a well-dressed guest queried, "So where are all the movie stars?" "They're all outside on the patio smoking," answered a Disney executive. (The culprits: Martin Landau, Russell Crowe, Amanda Plummer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1999 | KATHLEEN CRAUGHWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the reception immediately following the premiere screening of "The Insider"--writer-director Michael Mann's movie about tobacco company executive turned whistle-blower Jeffrey Wigand--a well-dressed guest queried, "So where are all the movie stars?" "They're all outside on the patio smoking," answered a Disney executive. (The culprits: Martin Landau, Russell Crowe, Amanda Plummer.
NEWS
October 30, 1999 | MYRON LEVIN and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With the motion picture saga of tobacco whistle-blower Jeffrey Wigand days from release, Wigand's former employer Brown & Williamson Tobacco Co. said Friday it had obtained evidence that Wigand manufactured his claim that he received death threats. The company posted on its Web site an affidavit in which an FBI agent said there was "probable cause" to believe a threatening letter and a bullet found in Wigand's mailbox in 1996 were planted by Wigand. The U.S. attorney's office in Louisville, Ky.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|