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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1989
The San Fernando Valley's first cultural center--a 2,865-seat theater-in-the-round built 25 years ago in Woodland Hills to showcase Broadway musicals--will soon be torn down to make way for an apartment project, officials said. A religious group that uses the defunct Valley Music Theater as a meeting hall is selling the dome-shaped building to a developer who plans to build 350 rental units in its place. The Valley Circuit of the Jehovah's Witnesses will move from the distinctive circular structure on Ventura Boulevard to a larger headquarters in the Newhall area, apartment developer Jay Wilton said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2009 | Raja Abdulrahim
There's a joke that there is no such thing as a Jehovah's Witness bystander. That's because all believers must witness, which means preaching and knocking on doors. "You bear a certain degree of guilt if you don't," said Harry Thompson of Studio City, who added that he has been witnessing for decades. Thompson called it akin to a search-and-rescue operation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jehovah's Witnesses have quietly abandoned a prediction that people alive in 1914 would live to see Christ's kingdom on earth--a major doctrine that lent urgency to the sect's door-to-door warnings that a bloody end of the world is imminent. Some ex-Witnesses predict the change will hurt the "sky-is-falling preaching" of the 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A victims' rights group released documents Thursday that showed the Jehovah's Witnesses settled lawsuits with 16 people, 14 of the cases in California, who claimed that they were sexually abused by church elders or that church officials failed to act on abuse allegations. At a news conference in Nashville, the group, called Silentlambs, demanded that the denomination change its policy for responding to sex abuse reports.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Jehovah's Witnesses are being told for the first time that they should violate confidentiality requirements in medical, legal and other professions when one of their own members is discovered to have committed a serious sin. "The objective would not be to spy on another's freedom but to help erring ones and to keep the Christian congregation clean," says the Sept. 1 issue of the Watchtower magazine, an authoritative publication of the Witnesses' Brooklyn-based Watchtower Society. The 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1998 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Pomona Superior Court jury convicted drunk driver Keith Cook on Friday in the death of Jadine Russell, rejecting the Azusa auto mechanic's claim that his victim caused her own demise when she declined a blood transfusion for religious reasons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2009 | Raja Abdulrahim
There's a joke that there is no such thing as a Jehovah's Witness bystander. That's because all believers must witness, which means preaching and knocking on doors. "You bear a certain degree of guilt if you don't," said Harry Thompson of Studio City, who added that he has been witnessing for decades. Thompson called it akin to a search-and-rescue operation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1995 | JOHN DART
The Jehovah's Witnesses have quietly abandoned a prediction that people alive in 1914 would live to see Christ's kingdom on Earth--a major doctrine that lent urgency to the sect's door-to-door warnings that a bloody end of the world is imminent. Some ex-Witnesses predict the change will hurt the "sky-is-falling preaching" of the 4.
NEWS
November 21, 1987 | United Press International
The Kenyan government Friday banned five church organizations from operating in the country, a move that follows closely the deportation of North American missionaries. The existence of the organizations was dubbed "contrary to the interests of peace" in the government gazette, which announced they would not be registered to operate in Kenya effective Nov. 16. The churches include the Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1991 | From Religious News Service
About 75 people braved a downpour here recently to demonstrate in front of the international headquarters of the Jehovah's Witnesses to protest the sect's teachings and practices. The demonstration is an annual event, coinciding with a national conference of former members of the sect, whose official name is the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society.
WORLD
March 28, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A Moscow court has banned the religious activities of Jehovah's Witnesses from Russia's capital in a move critics called a step back for religious freedom. Prosecutors said the Jehovah's Witnesses group destroys families and fosters hatred. Golovinsky District Court on Friday barred the group in Moscow under a provision that lets courts ban religious groups thought to incite hatred or intolerance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2001
In "Objections to Prayer" (letter, Dec. 7), Carleton H. Ralston wonders what harm it can do to have prayer in school. I have one incident that illustrates one danger. I grew up in a small town in Utah that had a 98% Mormon population. When I was in fifth grade a family of Jehovah's Witnesses moved into town, and one of their daughters was in my class at school. We started every day with a prayer and the Pledge of Allegiance, neither of which her religion allowed her to participate in. This didn't sit well with some of the children in the class, who were themselves "good Mormons."
NEWS
February 24, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Earlier generations of Yaroslav Sivulsky's family were persecuted as Jehovah's Witnesses in the Soviet Union, and then the state still sought to ban the group as a dangerous cult--even in democratic Russia. Finally, in what was called an important victory for religious freedom in Russia, Sivulsky saw justice done Friday when a Moscow court threw out a case that sought to outlaw the group in the capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2000
Re "Reconsider an Act That Divides Us," Ventura County Perspective, Aug. 13. Why, oh why, must one holding a personal religious conviction (or an absence of one) react so antagonistically toward those who hold another belief (or none at all)? The writer of this article seems to be unable to recognize that I, as a confirmed Episcopalian, can be quite comfortable if, in an audience preponderantly Catholic or Mormon or Confucian, the representative of that audience refers to the deity or philosophy to which most of the audience is devoted.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2000
Why is it that the bass player in the rear row of the L.A. Philharmonic (small stature, baldish) never joins in playing "The Star-Spangled Banner"? Can't someone teach him the score? Or does our national anthem offend him? It's very noticeable and annoying to us and our guests. PETER W. GEIGER Encino Rachelle B. Roe, the Philharmonic's associate director of public relations, responds: Please be advised that this player is a member of the Jehovah's Witnesses. He has complete respect for the government of the United States of America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, the religious faith that could have killed William Jennings saved his life. The 44-year-old computer programmer was suffering from liver failure when doctors told him his only hope of living longer than six months was a transplant. Such operations are notoriously difficult and messy, however--sometimes requiring up to 80 pints of donated blood. And Jennings is a devout Jehovah's Witness whose beliefs prohibit a single drop of another person's blood from entering his body.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1987 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
Singer Michael Jackson has dropped out of the Jehovah's Witnesses, a step that normally means he must be shunned by family members and friends who remain in the religious sect. A representative of the Woodland Hills congregation where Jackson belonged said that the entertainer "disassociated" himself from the congregation and "no longer wants to be known as a Jehovah's Witness."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1989 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, Times Staff Writer
An 11-year-old boy was in good condition Tuesday after being airlifted from his home in the San Bernardino Mountains for a court-ordered blood transfusion that his parents opposed because of their religious convictions. Gary and Jan Rossi, Jehovah's Witnesses who opposed the transfusion for their son Brian, were at the boy's bedside at Loma Linda University Medical Center on Tuesday. Brian Rossi suffers from aplastic anemia, a condition in which the bone marrow fails to produce blood cells needed to fight infection and support other vital functions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1999 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Pomona Superior Court judge Friday handed down a 10-year prison sentence for a drunk driver who said a woman whom he struck died because she refused a blood transfusion for religious reasons. Keith Eric Cook, 33, was convicted in December of gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated and two counts of driving under the influence causing injury for his involvement in an accident that led to the death of Jadine Russell, 55.
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