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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By David Ng
"American Idol" alumnus Constantine Maroulis has revealed via Twitter that the new revival of the musical "Jekyll and Hyde," in which he will star alongside Deborah Cox, is to open on Broadway in April. The actor tweeted this week that the production will open in April at the Richard Rodgers Theatre in New York. The musical is to embark on a North American tour before arriving on Broadway. Southern California audiences are to get a chance to see the new production first when it opens next month at the La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It may be easier to experience quality silent films these days than at any time since Al Jolson insisted to audiences, "You ain't seen nothing yet. " Take advantage of the largess and experience two classics in editions newly released for home viewing. Looking great in a new 20th Century Fox Blu-Ray plus DVD set is F.W. Murnau's classic 1927 film "Sunrise," a romance starring George O'Brien and Janet Gaynor that is so beautifully done it won an Oscar for "unique and artistic production.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It may be easier to experience quality silent films these days than at any time since Al Jolson insisted to audiences, "You ain't seen nothing yet. " Take advantage of the largess and experience two classics in editions newly released for home viewing. Looking great in a new 20th Century Fox Blu-Ray plus DVD set is F.W. Murnau's classic 1927 film "Sunrise," a romance starring George O'Brien and Janet Gaynor that is so beautifully done it won an Oscar for "unique and artistic production.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2013 | By Marcia Adair, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Valentine's Day: a symbol of the eros-industrial complex created by a cabal of rose growers, chocolatiers, jewelers and calligraphers or the perfect time for true romantics to show the rest of us how it is done? Culture Monster has analyzed the situation and determined that because music has been getting people busy since long before St. Valentine came on the scene, taking your love to a concert is foolproof no matter what your V-Day philosophy. To make it even easier, we've matched relationship types to an ideally suited show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times science writer Thomas H. Maugh II reports from the 197th national meeting of the American Chemical Society in Dallas
Many red wines contain a "Jekyll and Hyde" chemical that is both a mutagen (a chemical causing mutations in cells) and a potent anti-cancer chemical, according to microbiologist Terrance Leighton of UC Berkeley. The chemical, called quercetin, occurs naturally in high concentrations in onions and garlic and in lower concentrations in many fruits and vegetables, including the grapes used for making red wines. Recent studies in China have shown that Chinese who eat diets high in onions and garlic have only one-quarter as much stomach cancer as the general population there.
NEWS
February 4, 1993 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jonathan Daniel D'Arcy, the suspect in the burning death of a Tustin bookkeeper, was described by friends Wednesday as having a "Dr. Jekyll-Mr. Hyde" personality inclined to wild rages that turned him into "the meanest person in the world." From the front porch of his La Habra home, Jeremy Willis, 17, the son of a woman with whom D'Arcy lived on and off for the past five years, said the janitor was sometimes "a nice guy" but "deserves to die" if convicted in the slaying of Karin M. LaBorde.
TRAVEL
June 5, 2005
We thoroughly enjoyed "Cumberland Island: Go Wild" [April 17]. The day before the article appeared, we had just returned from an intracoastal cruise that began in Florida and went to Cumberland and Jekyll islands in Georgia and many other interesting places, ending in Charleston, S.C. Your description of the island was perfect -- complete with wild horses, Spanish moss dripping from very old oak trees and the ruins of the Carnegie's Dungeness mansion....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1987 | Al Martinez
Pearlie-May Simons believes she has died at least once, but doesn't discuss the incident in terms of awe or beauty, as others have described what they call their "death experiences." Sitting in her tiny North Hollywood apartment smoking a long cigarette, she, in fact, categorizes dying in growling invective as "one big pain in the behind," although she does not say behind.
HEALTH
November 24, 1997 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN
It helps to keep in mind that Joe Rogan was a stand-up comedian before he became handyman Joe on NBC's "NewsRadio." "So, Joe. I hear you exercise all the time," I said to the actor during a phone interview. "That right?" "No. Not at all. I don't know why they told you that." He sounded straight-faced. I didn't make any sound at all. "Yeah, yeah, I work out a lot. I belong to three gyms.
SPORTS
August 2, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
Two months ago, when his team was a candidate for a mercy killing, Dodger Manager Tom Lasorda had to beg the wolves to stay away. By then, Johnny Carson had stopped telling Dodger jokes. Like Nixon, the Dodgers had become too easy a target. This team didn't bleed Dodger blue, it coughed it up. Lasorda's first baseman had a matched set of sprained elbows. His only slugger was a singles-hitting gloveman. His leadoff man was an automatic out. His offense an accident.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
The lithe beauty in the form-fitting, flame-red sweater-jacket, even tighter black slacks and stiletto-heeled shoes with metal buckles planted herself in the lap of a strapping, handsome, lightly bearded fellow and started giving him a come-on in a saucy Cockney accent. Sitting 12 feet away, a second man watched with intense concentration, eyes fixed on the couple, chin cradled in his palm. In certain circumstances, this might be some kind of kinky fantasy. But here in a basement rehearsal room at the Pantages Theatre, it was serious show business.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Hollywood Boulevard is home to both the Pantages Theatre and Madame Tussauds, and there were times during the new production of "Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical" that I wondered if the two institutions had arranged a secret merger. This pre-Broadway touring production, which opened Tuesday at the Pantages, combines power singing and theatrical waxworks to retell the Robert Louis Stevenson tale of a doctor with a damnable dark side. The experience of the show, never a critic's darling, can only be compared to watching "American Idol" from inside an amusement park gallery showcasing the fiendish modus operandi of infamous murderers.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By David Ng
"American Idol" alumnus Constantine Maroulis has revealed via Twitter that the new revival of the musical "Jekyll and Hyde," in which he will star alongside Deborah Cox, is to open on Broadway in April. The actor tweeted this week that the production will open in April at the Richard Rodgers Theatre in New York. The musical is to embark on a North American tour before arriving on Broadway. Southern California audiences are to get a chance to see the new production first when it opens next month at the La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2009 | Charlotte Stoudt; F. Kathleen Foley; Daryl H. Miller; David C. Nichols
Virginia Woolf may have disapproved, but Robert Louis Stevenson's classic story of split personality, "Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde," says as much about modern psychology as a shelf full of Freud. Now running at Theatre 40, Jeffrey Hatcher's expressionistic stage adaptation of the 1886 novella gets a bold -- occasionally blunt -- treatment by director and designer Jeff G. Rack. Using little more than smoke, a two-way mirror, and a revolving upstage door, he creates a fun-house ride through a haunted psyche.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2009 | SUSAN KING
John Barrymore and John Gilbert were the Johnny Depp and Brad Pitt of the silent era. Astonishingly handsome, charismatic and athletic, they possessed that undefinable "it" quality that turns performers into superstars on the big screen. They also gave the 1920s' other top male stars, Rudolph Valentino and Douglas Fairbanks, a run for their money at the box office more than 80 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2008 | Sara Wolf, Special to The Times
There is much to celebrate about REDCAT's annual New Original Works Festival, which opened its three-week, three-program run Thursday. To begin with, there is a fair amount of assurance by now that, after five years, the festival's selections, chosen out of a pool of more than 100 applicants, will more than reward one's sense of adventure. And, as the first program amply demonstrates, the work may be fresh out of the box but the phrase "under construction" is hardly apt. Certainly, Baker & Tarpaga Dance Project's "Sira Kan/On the Road" will benefit from future pruning of a messy middle section, but the piece has "good bones" -- a strong premise and structure, studded with provocative images.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1995
I am the original co-author of the musical "Jekyll & Hyde" (composer Frank Wildhorn and I co-wrote both book and lyrics) and was both pleased by Jan Herman's article ("Break a Leg, Mr. Hyde," Aug. 20) and perplexed by certain information in it. Since my contribution to the work is still quite evident in the show, I wish to correct the record. Leslie Bricusse, the show's current lyricist, says of the original version (co-written by Frank and me), "Lyrically, it was nothing at all." If this is true, why does a substantial amount of the original work remain in the recently released complete double CD?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1999 | AL MARTINEZ
There is a healing quality to rage, which I experienced the other day while shopping. I almost threw a baby at its mother. It happened in Macy's in Woodland Hills, in a section of the store I am not at liberty to reveal. If I did, it would indicate what I am buying my wife for Christmas. Normally I shop for her in the tool department at Sears. Last year I gave her the half-inch drill she has always wanted. But I think she has enough tools to last for a while.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
This month marks the 80th anniversary of the premiere of "The Jazz Singer," the Al Jolson vehicle with music and a few lines of dialogue that ushered in the sound era. Ironically, "The Jazz Singer" arrived at a time when silent films were at their apex. The 1920s saw the release of such classics as "The Big Parade," "Greed," "The Wind" and "The Scarlet Letter." Cinematography, production design and editing were top-notch; the directorial talent, including King Vidor, Ernst Lubitsch and F.W.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2007 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
Of course it couldn't end well. In the original book "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" both fellows wound up dead, victim to the former's inability to control the latter's evil ways. So it's not surprising that Saturday's two-hour finale of BBC America's modern-day "Jekyll" racks up a few casualties. It's just too bad that the suspense and neck-prickling thrill of the previous episodes of what we still hope will be an ongoing series are among them.
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