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Jelena Dokic

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January 14, 2001 | LISA DILLMAN
What would a Grand Slam event be without a Dokic-inspired controversy? Jelena Dokic, a Wimbledon semifinalist last year at 17, told the Sunday Age of Melbourne that she would now be playing for Yugoslavia, not Australia. Her erratic father, Damir Dokic, who has been banned from the WTA Tour until March because of his numerous outbursts, said the draw was "fixed." The Dokic camp grew unsettled after she drew defending champion Lindsay Davenport in the first round of the Australian Open.
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SPORTS
March 8, 2003 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
Barbara Rittner had not won a match in 2003 before arriving at Indian Wells, spent almost four weeks fighting a severe case of bronchitis and traveled to the Pacific Life Open without a coach. Not exactly the recommended way to prepare to play a top-10 player. But that apparently doesn't matter if Jelena Dokic is on the other side of the court.
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SPORTS
June 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
The father of 17-year-old Australian player Jelena Dokic was ejected from a Wimbledon warmup tournament in Birmingham, England, for verbally abusing officials during his daughter's match. He later was arrested for lying down in traffic and jumping on the hood of a car. Police said Damir Dokic, 40, had been drinking and was arrested "for his own safety." He was not charged and was released three hours after his arrest.
SPORTS
November 7, 2002 | Diane Pucin
When Jelena Dokic speaks, she looks down. At her fingers, at the table where she is sitting, at her feet. She looks across the room, at the wall, at the door. She looks longingly at the door. She is eager for the escape it provides, for the way out it signifies. Dokic has played 28 tennis tournaments this year and has come to Los Angeles to play in No. 29. To compare, top-ranked Serena Williams has played 12 events. Second-ranked Venus Williams has played in 15. It is no wonder Dokic is pale.
SPORTS
August 9, 2002 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's amazing that England, a country with a proud tennis tradition, can have no female players ranked in the top 100, then suddenly one day, there's hope for potential glory. If Greg Rusedski can do it for the Brits, why not Jelena Dokic? The Canadian-born Rusedski had to make only one change, though, gaining British citizenship in 1995. Dokic, 19, has already been something of a citizen of the world.
SPORTS
August 4, 2002 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jelena Dokic, who rarely lacks confidence, hardly sounded optimistic about her chances against Venus Williams in today's final of the Acura Classic. "She presents all sorts of problems for everyone," said Dokic, who fought off two match points in her semifinal victory against Anna Kournikova of Russia. "Serena [Williams] is the only one to beat her recently. She has the power and the speed. Maybe if she commits 50 or 60 unforced errors, I'll have a chance."
SPORTS
March 8, 2003 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
Barbara Rittner had not won a match in 2003 before arriving at Indian Wells, spent almost four weeks fighting a severe case of bronchitis and traveled to the Pacific Life Open without a coach. Not exactly the recommended way to prepare to play a top-10 player. But that apparently doesn't matter if Jelena Dokic is on the other side of the court.
SPORTS
June 2, 2001 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hungary 2, Jelena Dokic 0. After Dokic lost to Rita Kuti Kis of Hungary, ranked No. 89, in the first round of the 2000 Australian Open, she disappeared for a few hours and emerged to read a classless statement. Dokic ripped Kuti Kis as someone who has "never been a player and I guess probably never will be." The statement wasn't forgotten, and Petra Mandula, another Hungarian who plays doubles with Kuti Kis, has no problems with her memory.
SPORTS
July 1, 2000 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even the Daily Telegraph, a conservative newspaper, looked different Friday. Above the fold was a five-column picture of tennis father Damir Dokic, holding an English flag of St. George, a policeman on either side of Dokic. The caption said, "Match point: Flag-flying Damir Dokic, wayward father of teenage star Jelena Dokic, receives a police escort at Wimbledon yesterday."
SPORTS
September 5, 2000 | J.A. Adande
The difference worth noting between Serena Williams and Jelena Dokic wasn't on the court. It's the difference that makes you feel sorry for Dokic, and not just because she lost to Williams, 7-6 (7), 6-0, in their fourth-round U.S. Open match. The difference was up in the stands. Sitting in the players' box were some of Williams' family members, including sisters Venus, Lyndrea and Isha, and father Richard, until Richard left midway through the first set.
SPORTS
August 20, 2002 | LISA DILLMAN
One of the sadder sights of the summer hard-court campaign in Southern California was seen on a chilly Saturday night at Manhattan Beach, the eve of the final between Chanda Rubin and Lindsay Davenport. It had nothing to do with forehands landing long and wide, or double faults. This unfolded off the court, in the weight room at Manhattan Country Club a few hours after Jelena Dokic had turned in a sorry performance in the semifinals, losing to Rubin, 6-0, 6-2, in 41 minutes.
SPORTS
August 9, 2002 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's amazing that England, a country with a proud tennis tradition, can have no female players ranked in the top 100, then suddenly one day, there's hope for potential glory. If Greg Rusedski can do it for the Brits, why not Jelena Dokic? The Canadian-born Rusedski had to make only one change, though, gaining British citizenship in 1995. Dokic, 19, has already been something of a citizen of the world.
SPORTS
August 5, 2002 | Diane Pucin
It was on the second point of the final game of the last set of Sunday's Acura Classic final. Even though she had an upset stomach and an aching body, Jelena Dokic was driven to keep plotting winning shots on each point. So Dokic hit a nice forehand return of serve. She pushed her opponent farther and farther back on the court. She kept her opponent running, on the defensive. When the opponent had to lunge forward to scoop a forehand back, Dokic played a beautiful lob.
SPORTS
August 4, 2002 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jelena Dokic, who rarely lacks confidence, hardly sounded optimistic about her chances against Venus Williams in today's final of the Acura Classic. "She presents all sorts of problems for everyone," said Dokic, who fought off two match points in her semifinal victory against Anna Kournikova of Russia. "Serena [Williams] is the only one to beat her recently. She has the power and the speed. Maybe if she commits 50 or 60 unforced errors, I'll have a chance."
SPORTS
August 3, 2002 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The third set used to be the possession of Jennifer Capriati. She may not have owned them outright--who ever does?--but she could at least claim a long-term lease. Encroachment came from Serena Williams and Justine Henin in 2002 with Williams defeating Capriati four times this year, three times in three sets. Membership in the club expanded on Friday with a surprise guest, Jelena Dokic, who once used to fade in the latter stages against Capriati.
SPORTS
July 1, 2001 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Venus Williams, Lindsay Davenport, Andre Agassi and Pat Rafter won in straight sets Saturday. Jelena Dokic provided some long overdue theatrics from tennis' most dysfunctional family. Now there's a disputed title. All in all, it was a fitting end to Wimbledon's first week. It didn't exactly go out like the lion it seemed at the start Monday, when top-seeded Martina Hingis lost to No. 84 Virginia Ruano Pascual. About the closest it came was with the mildly surprising losses of No.
SPORTS
August 20, 2002 | LISA DILLMAN
One of the sadder sights of the summer hard-court campaign in Southern California was seen on a chilly Saturday night at Manhattan Beach, the eve of the final between Chanda Rubin and Lindsay Davenport. It had nothing to do with forehands landing long and wide, or double faults. This unfolded off the court, in the weight room at Manhattan Country Club a few hours after Jelena Dokic had turned in a sorry performance in the semifinals, losing to Rubin, 6-0, 6-2, in 41 minutes.
SPORTS
August 5, 2002 | Diane Pucin
It was on the second point of the final game of the last set of Sunday's Acura Classic final. Even though she had an upset stomach and an aching body, Jelena Dokic was driven to keep plotting winning shots on each point. So Dokic hit a nice forehand return of serve. She pushed her opponent farther and farther back on the court. She kept her opponent running, on the defensive. When the opponent had to lunge forward to scoop a forehand back, Dokic played a beautiful lob.
SPORTS
June 2, 2001 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hungary 2, Jelena Dokic 0. After Dokic lost to Rita Kuti Kis of Hungary, ranked No. 89, in the first round of the 2000 Australian Open, she disappeared for a few hours and emerged to read a classless statement. Dokic ripped Kuti Kis as someone who has "never been a player and I guess probably never will be." The statement wasn't forgotten, and Petra Mandula, another Hungarian who plays doubles with Kuti Kis, has no problems with her memory.
SPORTS
May 21, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
With only her tennis commanding attention, Jelena Dokic won her first title by defeating Amelie Mauresmo on Sunday at the Italian Open in Rome. Dokic, 18, kept her composure and delivered punishing shots in winning, 7-6 (3), 6-1, and establishing herself as a threat to win the French Open. "It's really nice to win that first title," said Dokic, a Wimbledon semifinalist last year. "This isn't a small one, either. And, hopefully, it won't be the last."
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