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Jellyfish

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2000
Your July 4 article states that jellyfish have been almost nonexistent along local beaches for the past quarter-century and that many people have never seen them before. When I was a kid in the 1950s, my family went to Doheny and San Clemente beaches in the summer, and I remember that back then it was very common to see the beach strewn with jellyfish, some of them rather large. You could hardly walk 20 feet without running into one. I also remember the screams of a girl who had been stung by one at San Clemente Beach as she was taken out of the water.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- After months of secrecy, Twitter co-founder Biz Stone has taken the wraps off Jelly , a new question-and-answer app for iOS and Android. The app is designed to give people answers from their social networks and will compete with similar services such as Quora. You can download Jelly by going to the company's website. What distinguishes Jelly: You can ask questions with images. Jelly is focused on images, which Stone says “add depth and context to any question.” You can crop an image, zoom in on something, even draw on the image to ask your question.
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SCIENCE
November 6, 2010 | By Lori Kozlowski, Los Angeles Times
John Dabiri, assistant professor of aeronautics and bioengineering at Caltech who won a MacArthur Award this year, is fascinated by jellyfish. He believes jellyfish propulsion can inform engineering, which in turn can inform efficiency in wave and wind technology. He recently spoke with The Times. Is your background in engineering or biology or both? I was trained as a mechanical engineer, and I always thought I'd end up working in the auto industry because I'm from the Midwest, and that's what a lot of people do there.
SCIENCE
November 25, 2013 | Amina Khan
It doesn't pay to underestimate a jellyfish. They may not look like the most athletic swimmers, but they're remarkably efficient -- and their body plan could have advantages that translate to the air, too. A team from New York University has designed a flying jellyfish-like robot that uses four flapping wings to stay aloft. This unconventional robot, described at the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting in Pittsburgh, could lead the way for flying mini-robots used in search-and-rescue and military operations and even as environmental sensors.
SCIENCE
July 28, 2012 | By Amina Khan
Are you ready for this jelly? Using rat heart cells and silicone, engineers at Caltech and Harvard have built a tiny, swimming, artificial jellyfish. The centimeter-wide creation moves by using muscles in its soft body to pump water, just as its living peers do. And since real jellyfish, with their long tentacles, were once named after Medusa, the snake-haired monster of Greek myth, the scientists have dubbed their nonliving critter Medusoid. Rather than try to mimic the jellyfish wholesale, the researchers decided to identify some of the factors  that make the jellyfish a successful swimmer - shape, stroke cycle, properly organized muscle fibers, elastic recoil - and built their jelly according to those principles.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
The official term for the robotic jelly is "biomimetic jellyfish," but we prefer to think of it as Robojelly -- flexible robotic king of the high seas. Robojelly is about the size of the palm of your hand and has the ability to change its size and shape as a result of external stimuli, just like its animal counterpart. Engineers used a shape memory alloy (SMA) and silicon to create the robojelly's body, which one researcher described as feeling a bit like an artificial breast implant.
SCIENCE
November 25, 2013 | Amina Khan
It doesn't pay to underestimate a jellyfish. They may not look like the most athletic swimmers, but they're remarkably efficient -- and their body plan could have advantages that translate to the air, too. A team from New York University has designed a flying jellyfish-like robot that uses four flapping wings to stay aloft. This unconventional robot, described at the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting in Pittsburgh, could lead the way for flying mini-robots used in search-and-rescue and military operations and even as environmental sensors.
NEWS
August 30, 2005 | Scott Doggett
THE jellyfish invasion along Southern California beaches this summer appears to be waning in time for the Labor Day weekend. The big, gelatinous creatures have been a beachgoer's scourge this year, although divers have been wowed at swimming among legions of the animals. "They appear to have tapered off everywhere," says John Moore, founder of Divebums.com, a diving resource for Southern California. Lifeguards at Huntington Beach have treated 5,492 cases of jellyfish injuries this summer.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Meet Cyro, the latest robotic jellyfish to emerge from the engineering labs at Virginia Tech. Cyro measures 5 feet, 7 inches across and weighs in at 170 pounds. Its design was based on the real-life species Cyanea capillata , one of the largest jellyfish in the world. (Cyro is an amalgam of “Cyanea” and “robot.”) When submerged in a pool, the robot flaps its eight arms and swims gracefully.  “Our goal with this robot is to copy the natural jellyfish,” Alex Villanueva, a grad student at Virginia Tech's college of engineering, explains in the video above.
SCIENCE
November 27, 2010 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
The physicists, biologists and engineers were huddled around every available bar-height table in the Long Beach Convention Center, covering their tiny surfaces with laptops and notebooks. Posters in long, military rows showcased their efforts: An analysis of the movement of milk in English tea, a report on the stripes of gas across Jupiter. In a hotel next door, Aryesh Mukherjee, a physics graduate student at Harvard University, was explaining how he built, with the help of rubber glove-like material, a synthetic voice box that could imitate a range of birdsongs.
SCIENCE
October 7, 2013 | By Amina Khan
In a fish-eat-fish ocean filled with sharks and other fierce swimmers, how has the delicate jellyfish survived - and thrived - through hundreds of millions of years of evolutionary culling? A team of biologists and engineers says it has discovered the "jelly's" secret: They're incredibly efficient swimmers. Jellyfish don't look like they're built for speed. Less than 1% of their body mass is devoted to muscle, compared with more than 50% in fish. But they're competent predators - and perhaps even too successful.
SCIENCE
October 7, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Watch out, jellyfish. JEROS, the jellyfish-destroying robot, is coming for you. Or possibly making more of you. Developed by a team of engineers in Korea, JEROS is a robot designed for destroying jellyfish swarms, like the one that recently clogged the cooling pipes at a nuclear power plant in Sweden, temporarily shutting down the plant. JEROS stands for Jellyfish Elimination Robotic Swarm, and it uses a camera and GPS system to spot jellyfish swarms underwater and maneuver autonomously toward them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
As Diana Nyad crawled out of the sea Monday, she was a wobbly, disoriented ball of inspiration for our times, a rebuke to the idea that we age out of our dreams. It took her five tries, but she finally swam unprotected from Cuba to Key West, Fla. Who has that kind of drive at 64? Who has that kind of heart? Even if she hadn't completed this 110-mile swim, she'd be an inspiration to all the aging Baby Boomers who fight to stay fit but secretly wonder if the battle is lost, or all the hormone-challenged women who think they're too tired to tie on their running shoes each day. Really, she's an inspiration to anyone, anywhere who wonders how to persevere through failure.
NATIONAL
September 2, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
In the end, emerging from the great big ocean wearing a blue swimming cap and goggles -- and having swum roughly 110 miles in 52 hours and 54 minutes -- Diana Nyad still had enough strength to walk ashore Monday. Failing four times over the years, on her fifth and final attempt this weekend, the 64-year-old Nyad officially became the first swimmer to go the distance from Cuba to Florida without a shark cage. Upon reaching shore at Smathers Beach in Key West, Fla., Nyad had three things to tell the mob of onlookers who had watched her achieve a lifelong dream.
SCIENCE
August 14, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
By the light of day, the two transgenic baby rabbits look no different from their non-transgenic siblings -- white, fluffy and very cute. But put the whole litter under a black light, and you'll know exactly which two bunnies are special. They'll be glowing bright , fluorescent green. (For daylight and black-light shots of the transgenic rabbits and their littermates, see the photo gallery above). The glowing bunnies were born this month in a lab at the University of Istanbul.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2013 | By Jori Finkel
In L.A. for his upcoming show at Blum & Poe, the Japanese artist Takashi Murakami started his week with an appearance at LACMA for the "international premiere" of his new movie, "Jellyfish Eyes. " No word yet on distribution plans, but do not expect his usual short-format animated dream-sequence. Running 100 minutes, this movie mixes live action with computer animation to tell the story of a Japanese boy, Masashi, who finds a lovable Friend (as the species is known) with extraterrestrial powers at a time when he needs it the most, in the wake of his father's death.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1990 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Remember those floppy crocheted hats with panels made from cut-up Coors cans that some people wore in the '70s? If that gives you a kick, you probably would have liked seeing Jellyfish at the Roxy on Thursday. If you're still wearing one, you're probably in the band. Bassist Chris Manning was indeed so becapped on Thursday, and if that doesn't give you a good enough picture, how about "Alice in Wonderland"-meets-"H. R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1995 | BILL BILLITER
An unusual and potentially lethal type of jellyfish washed up near the city pier over the weekend, according to Golden West College biology professor Sharon Clark, who found the creature. Clark said the jellyfish is "either a Portuguese man-of-war or one of its relatives." Such sea life has poisonous tentacles whose sting can sometimes be fatal, according to the California Fish and Game Department. Positive identification of the species of the jellyfish has not been made, Clark said Monday.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Meet Cyro, the latest robotic jellyfish to emerge from the engineering labs at Virginia Tech. Cyro measures 5 feet, 7 inches across and weighs in at 170 pounds. Its design was based on the real-life species Cyanea capillata , one of the largest jellyfish in the world. (Cyro is an amalgam of “Cyanea” and “robot.”) When submerged in a pool, the robot flaps its eight arms and swims gracefully.  “Our goal with this robot is to copy the natural jellyfish,” Alex Villanueva, a grad student at Virginia Tech's college of engineering, explains in the video above.
SCIENCE
November 14, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Jellyfish have inspired ideas for bird-safe wind turbines and artificial hearts. Now a team of researchers has drawn insight from a jellyfish's tentacles to design a better way to capture dangerous cancer cells at large roving through the bloodstream. Cancer cells are often most threatening when they break off from their original site and start invading other parts of the body, a process called metastasis. Current methods try to filter these cells out of the bloodstream for analysis by running a tiny sample of blood through a channel in a microfluidic device.
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