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Jemima Kirke

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
HBO's “Girls” won a Golden Globe award for television comedy or musical series Sunday night, beating out a diverse field that included last year's winner, “Modern Family” (ABC), as well as “Smash” (NBC), “Episodes” (Showtime) and “The Big Bang Theory” (CBS). Created by and starring Lena Dunham, “Girls” centers on a clique of self-involved 20-something Brooklynites. The divisive program earned both fervent acclaim and intense criticism when it debuted last year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
Allison Williams, one-quarter of the coming-of-age female confederation in HBO's "Girls," finds herself at the center of a heated discussion, at least among the show's modest but fervent audience: Is Marnie a bad friend? Or is Hannah a bad friend? The culturally polarizing comedy spent much of its debut season redefining sexual parameters and narcissism for the millennial generation. But friendships are at the core of the Lena Dunham-created series, and they're experiencing growing pains.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The second season of "Girls" premieres Sunday on HBO and one can only hope that it will be allowed to do so without too much obsessive talk about creator-star Lena Dunham's penchant for nudity. Which is almost immediately on display, to be sure - but with any luck, her naked form will now be treated as just another character tic, or comedic trope, like Kramer's abrupt exits and entrances or Liz Lemon's weird eating habits. When the show debuted last year, critics responded to Dunham's willingness to display her perfectly normal young woman's body with such fervor that it bordered on fetishism.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
HBO's “Girls” won a Golden Globe award for television comedy or musical series Sunday night, beating out a diverse field that included last year's winner, “Modern Family” (ABC), as well as “Smash” (NBC), “Episodes” (Showtime) and “The Big Bang Theory” (CBS). Created by and starring Lena Dunham, “Girls” centers on a clique of self-involved 20-something Brooklynites. The divisive program earned both fervent acclaim and intense criticism when it debuted last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Toward the end of the first episode of HBO's "Girls," Hannah (Lena Dunham), in the hopes of persuading her parents to continue supporting her, hands them the half-dozen pages of the "book" she has been writing for the last two years. To finish this proposed nine-chapter opus, all she wants is $1,100 a month, for two more years. It's a wonderful moment, capturing the inevitable divide between generations. With all the gloriously narcissistic conviction of an academically coddled, white, upper-middle-class publishing "intern," Hannah truly believes she is writing a memoir - she just has to live it first.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2012 | By Joy Press, Los Angeles Times
Lena Dunham is sitting at a Larchmont Boulevard cafe in a pale yellow dress and a blazer, rummaging around her bag for a bottle of green juice. She's drinking it to stave off illness caused by frequent plane travel - one of the hazards of being an in-demand wunderkind. Her upcoming HBO series, "Girls," was filmed in New York, where she sleeps in her parents' basement while she waits for her new place to be ready. But Dunham just spent half a year in L.A. so she could edit and consult with the show's producers, Judd Apatow and Jenni Konner.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
Allison Williams, one-quarter of the coming-of-age female confederation in HBO's "Girls," finds herself at the center of a heated discussion, at least among the show's modest but fervent audience: Is Marnie a bad friend? Or is Hannah a bad friend? The culturally polarizing comedy spent much of its debut season redefining sexual parameters and narcissism for the millennial generation. But friendships are at the core of the Lena Dunham-created series, and they're experiencing growing pains.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Jay-Z has turned the second song of his new album “Magna Carta Holy Grail" into a new art form. The musical mogul Wednesday repeatedly rapped “Picasso Baby" during a six-hour performance piece at the Pace Gallery in New York. In what will likely become a music video, Jay-Z was surrounded by an entourage of cameras, curators, celebrities and Picasso's own granddaughter. “I'm the modern day Pablo / Picasso, baby,” the rapper repeated to a demur Diana Widmaier Picasso.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week of Jan. 6-12, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     CBS This Morning Cote de Pablo. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Lena Dunham, Allison Williams, Jemima Kirke and Zosia Mamet; Jeff Bridges. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America Ben Affleck and Tony Mendez; Paula Deen; Conor Maynard performs. (N) 7 a.m. KABC Live With Kelly and Michael Jessica Chastain; Busy Philipps; Farnoosh Torabi. (N)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There are tiny pleasures to be found in "Tiny Furniture," a bare mumble of mumblecore musings on a brief time in the life of a young woman named Aura. She's a lot like the film's writer-director Lena Dunham, and in fact is portrayed by Dunham herself. The film is set in that dark place that so often falls between finishing college and figuring out the rest of your life, with the penance for your indecision a move back in with your parents. It begins with that homecoming, Aura unpacking her unhappiness along with her bags.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
The second season of "Girls" premieres Sunday on HBO and one can only hope that it will be allowed to do so without too much obsessive talk about creator-star Lena Dunham's penchant for nudity. Which is almost immediately on display, to be sure - but with any luck, her naked form will now be treated as just another character tic, or comedic trope, like Kramer's abrupt exits and entrances or Liz Lemon's weird eating habits. When the show debuted last year, critics responded to Dunham's willingness to display her perfectly normal young woman's body with such fervor that it bordered on fetishism.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Toward the end of the first episode of HBO's "Girls," Hannah (Lena Dunham), in the hopes of persuading her parents to continue supporting her, hands them the half-dozen pages of the "book" she has been writing for the last two years. To finish this proposed nine-chapter opus, all she wants is $1,100 a month, for two more years. It's a wonderful moment, capturing the inevitable divide between generations. With all the gloriously narcissistic conviction of an academically coddled, white, upper-middle-class publishing "intern," Hannah truly believes she is writing a memoir - she just has to live it first.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2012 | By Joy Press, Los Angeles Times
Lena Dunham is sitting at a Larchmont Boulevard cafe in a pale yellow dress and a blazer, rummaging around her bag for a bottle of green juice. She's drinking it to stave off illness caused by frequent plane travel - one of the hazards of being an in-demand wunderkind. Her upcoming HBO series, "Girls," was filmed in New York, where she sleeps in her parents' basement while she waits for her new place to be ready. But Dunham just spent half a year in L.A. so she could edit and consult with the show's producers, Judd Apatow and Jenni Konner.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2013 | By Steve Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- Tony Danza made a late appearance after a night at the theater. Shosh and Jessa (OK, Zosia Mamet and Jemima Kirke) breezed through the penthouse after-party with their male dates. Patrick Stewart and Kathleen Turner dropped in, sans mention of Jean-Luc Picard and Peggy Sue. And Debbie Harry walked up to the director to tell him what a fan she was, though she didn't tell him to call her. And those were only the second-most surreal things to happen at the premiere this week for Danny Boyle's genre masher "Trance.” The most strangeness, of course, came on the screen as, in true pot-Boyler fashion, bloodied half-heads competed with parallel realities, and a sense that something was happening gave way to the sense that something was not happening at all, or that it may have happened before, or that one day it will happen but hadn't happened yet. "I apologize," Boyle said, "that this isn't a life-affirming film like '127 Hours.' " The basic plot of "Trance," which opens Friday in the U.S. courtesy of Fox Searchlight, revolves around an art heist gone wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
From the moment we met her two years ago, Lena Dunham has been as much character as creator. Her story - a 23-year-old with one small film to her credit handed the reins of a high-profile, frantically marketed HBO series - bled through the show's narrative even before it aired. That she also starred in "Girls," which follows the exploits of four young post-collegiate women living in New York, only solidified the narrative blur. As with Woody Allen in his mid-career heyday, where the written narrative ends and the creator's reality begins is sometimes difficult to distinguish.
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