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Jendayi E Frazer

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WORLD
April 8, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The top U.S. diplomat for Africa urged Somalis on Saturday to leave behind 16 years of bloody conflict and focus on national reconciliation, warning that the country had turned into a refuge for terrorists. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs Jendayi E. Frazer made a surprise visit to the Horn of Africa country on the sixth day of a fragile cease-fire between the government and Islamic insurgents.
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WORLD
April 8, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The top U.S. diplomat for Africa urged Somalis on Saturday to leave behind 16 years of bloody conflict and focus on national reconciliation, warning that the country had turned into a refuge for terrorists. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs Jendayi E. Frazer made a surprise visit to the Horn of Africa country on the sixth day of a fragile cease-fire between the government and Islamic insurgents.
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WORLD
January 8, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Gunmen attacked Ethiopian troops in Somalia's capital, Mogadishu, residents said, as Somalian and U.S. officials pledged to work together to stabilize the chaotic nation. Attackers opened fire on forces backing the interim government in the second day of violence directed at Ethiopian troops, who helped oust Islamists who had taken the capital. The violence came after Somalian Prime Minister Ali Mohammed Gedi met in Nairobi, Kenya, with Washington's top diplomat for Africa, Jendayi E. Frazer.
WORLD
June 30, 2006 | From Reuters
Funds are flowing into Somalia from Saudi Arabia and Yemen to support the Islamic courts movement that seized the capital, Mogadishu, this month, a senior U.S. official said Thursday. "I don't want to say the Saudi government is supporting any particular court, but I do know that there is money coming in from Saudi Arabia," Jendayi E. Frazer, assistant secretary of State for African affairs, told the House International Relations Committee.
OPINION
August 29, 2006
THE GOVERNMENT OF SUDAN has stopped even pretending to cooperate with the international community's efforts to end the ongoing genocide within its borders. So the time has come for the world to stop pretending that Sudan isn't a rogue state and slap it with the harshest possible sanctions. Just a few months ago, Sudanese officials seemed on the verge of accepting a U.N. peacekeeping force. The U.S.
WORLD
February 17, 2008 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Saturday defended his decision to avoid Africa's most troubled quarters on his trip across the continent's midsection, saying the United States was ready to help countries that make the "right choices." For Bush, the trip underscores an effort over seven years to shift the way the United States does business with the developing world, tying government aid to anti-corruption campaigns and commercial ventures to free- trade commitments. He said he wanted to say to future U.S.
WORLD
September 15, 2007 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Following a week of walkouts and heated arguments, an unlikely alliance of Somalian opposition groups found an ideological middle ground Friday, electing a moderate Islamist leader after agreeing to omit a reference to "jihad" from its charter.
WORLD
January 25, 2006 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
When South African Foreign Minister Nkosazana Zuma first started attending African leadership summits in 1999, security guards would often block her at the door. "They assumed I was someone's spouse or secretary," Zuma recalled. On Tuesday, there was no mistaking the identity of Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, the new president of Liberia who made her first appearance at the African Union's annual summit here.
WORLD
September 1, 2006 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
The Security Council voted Thursday to send a new peacekeeping force to Sudan's Darfur region, but the country's government immediately rejected the resolution as "illegal." The rejection heightened diplomats' concerns about a looming humanitarian crisis in the troubled region, where an African Union contingent has been largely unable to protect civilians and monitor a cease-fire. The Sudanese government said the U.N.
WORLD
April 25, 2008 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. joined calls Thursday for an arms embargo against Zimbabwe as the Chinese weapons shipment that sparked a scandal turned for home, shunned by ports in southern Africa. Young militiamen known as "green bombers" and war veterans have been attacking opposition activists and supporters in rural areas of Zimbabwe, according to human rights organizations and the opposition party Movement for Democratic Change. Britain has urged an international arms embargo against Zimbabwe because of the violence, and South African Nobel laureate Desmond Tutu and the top U.S. diplomat on Africa, Jendayi E. Frazer, joined the call Thursday.
WORLD
December 21, 2006 | Edmund Sanders and Abukar Albadri, Special to The Times
Clashes between Islamic fighters and Ethiopian-backed government soldiers heightened fears Wednesday that Somalia is inching toward a civil war that could drag in the entire Horn of Africa. As international negotiators worked furiously to resolve the dispute, armed battles around Somalia's transitional capital of Baidoa killed at least one government soldier, according to Somali officials.
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