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Jenji Kohan

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
There's something to be said about being a walking billboard. Jenji Kohan, best known for being the creator of Showtime's "Weeds," fully embraces the task. Her nails - hands and toes - are coated in an orange hue. Her short hair is dizzied up with orange streaks. "I don't know how this Netflix promotion works," Kohan joked. "I'm just trying to spread the word anyway I can. " PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments The 43-year-old writer-producer is at the helm of Netflix's latest commission to roll out this year: "Orange Is the New Black.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Todd Martens
"Orange Is the new Black" will be returning for a second season on June 6, Netflix confirmed on Saturday. The announcement was tucked onto the end of the second-season finale of "House of Cards," the full 13 episodes of which went live on Netflix at midnight PST. A brief teaser trailer, embedded above, was released, but few details or hints as to what viewers may expect in the second season were revealed. Also unknown at press time is how the president feels about the series. Barack Obama's TV tastes became national news when he asked via Twitter that no one spoil "House of Cards" for the Oval Office viewing audience . Jenji Kohan's women-in-prison comedy-drama, an adaptation of  Piper Kerman's memoir, which chronicled her yearlong stint in federal prison, earned its lead, Taylor Schilling, a Golden Globe nomination in its first season.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Amy Dawes
When show creator Jenji Kohan threw in with Netflix at the outset of its original programming efforts, that was still a gutsy move. "I traded money for freedom, in essence," says the veteran TV writer of her move to what she calls "the new frontier. " "I had a good experience making 'Weeds' at Showtime, and that made it vital not to take a step backwards, into a culture of fear, and being micro-managed. And Netflix has been wide-open, embracing and smart. I love being out in front. It's exciting.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Amy Dawes
When show creator Jenji Kohan threw in with Netflix at the outset of its original programming efforts, that was still a gutsy move. "I traded money for freedom, in essence," says the veteran TV writer of her move to what she calls "the new frontier. " "I had a good experience making 'Weeds' at Showtime, and that made it vital not to take a step backwards, into a culture of fear, and being micro-managed. And Netflix has been wide-open, embracing and smart. I love being out in front. It's exciting.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Showtime's upcoming eighth season of "Weeds" will be the last for the long-running comedy, a network spokesperson confirmed Wednesday. Created by Jenji Kohan and starring Mary-Louise Parker as a pot-dealing mom, "Weeds" was one the premium cable channel's eminent series when it made its debut in 2005 and has picked up numerous Emmy nominations during its tenure.   The Lionsgate-produced comedy averaged around 720,000 viewers last season, according to Nielsen. News of the series' end comes just days after the network announced it picked up two drama pilots -- Liev Schreiber's "Ray Donovan" and Michael Sheen's "Masters of Sex" -- as series.  Some cast and crew members have already lined up work: Justin Kirk (who plays Uncle Andy)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
An hourlong comedy about women in prison. Released in summer. Without the requisite big-name lead. On Netflix. Television just does not get any more experimental than that. And, as Mary McNamara and Yvonne Villarreal discuss in this week's Talking TV video, "Orange Is the New Black" proves precisely why experiments are so important. Lacking the A-list hype (Kevin Spacey! Robin Wright!) surrounding "House of Cards" and the anticipatory lovefest that led up to the resurrection of "Arrested Development," Jenji Kohan's adaptation of Piper Kerman's memoir, also called "Orange Is the New Black," not only seems buzzier than both those shows combined, it's way more important.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
Having cooled its heels since fall, "The Stones" premieres tonight on CBS. It stars Robert Klein, the comedian; Judith Light, who played opposite Tony Danza on "Who's the Boss?" for a thousand years (and did we ever find out who the boss was?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Looks like orange will be in season for a while. Netflix has renewed its yet-to-debut prison dramedy "Orange Is the New Black" for a second season. Hey, we thought that was Starz's modus operandi ! The 13-episode series, which comes from "Weeds" creator Jenji Kohan and is based on Piper Kerman's memoir, will hit the Internet on July 11. The second season is expected to get its unveiling on the subscription screening site in 2014. VIDEO: Fall 2013 TV trailers “Jenji and her team have produced a phenomenal series and we're eager to get a second season to our viewers,” said Cindy Holland, vice president of original content at Netflix, in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2008 | Mary McNamara, Times Television Critic
When "Weeds" premiered on Showtime, it seemed the quintessential suburban satire: Widowed stay-at-home mom accidentally becomes pot dealer and finds her inner gangsta amid the manicured lawns and granite-countered hypocrisy of a Southern California planned community. What creator Jenji Kohan may not have counted on was that her cast and characters would so quickly become literally too cool for the 'burbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Piper Kerman was a comfortably settled member of the Manhattan creative class on the day in 1998 when two police officers knocked on her door, telling her she'd been indicted for her brief but fateful involvement in a drug-trafficking operation years earlier. By the time she finally went to prison six years later, she was engaged, in her 30s and desperate to get her 15-month sentence over with. “The beginning of the sentence was the beginning of seeing the light at the end of the tunnel,” Kerman said this week, over a late lunch of heirloom tomatoes at the trendy New York City gastropub the Breslin -- a far cry from the iceberg lettuce and mystery meat she subsisted on while locked up at a federal prison in Danbury, Conn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
An hourlong comedy about women in prison. Released in summer. Without the requisite big-name lead. On Netflix. Television just does not get any more experimental than that. And, as Mary McNamara and Yvonne Villarreal discuss in this week's Talking TV video, "Orange Is the New Black" proves precisely why experiments are so important. Lacking the A-list hype (Kevin Spacey! Robin Wright!) surrounding "House of Cards" and the anticipatory lovefest that led up to the resurrection of "Arrested Development," Jenji Kohan's adaptation of Piper Kerman's memoir, also called "Orange Is the New Black," not only seems buzzier than both those shows combined, it's way more important.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
"Orange is the New Black. " Jenji Kohan's serialized adaptation of Piper Kerman's memoir about doing time in a women's prison, proves that Netflix isn't just delivering original content in a unique way (i.e. a season at a time). It's also delivering unique content. Smart, funny and surprisingly moving, "Orange is the New Black" dares to suggest that the pretty, white, middle-class gal that television so loves to position as an Everywoman is nothing of the kind. As Piper Chapman, Taylor Shilling has all the high-maintenance, obliviously entitled tics down pat. Having finally gotten her life together -- the nice apartment, the devoted boyfriend, the artisanal soap business -- Piper is more than a little outraged that she is going to be punished for the youthful "indiscretion" of carrying drug money for an former drug-dealing girlfriend.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Piper Kerman was a comfortably settled member of the Manhattan creative class on the day in 1998 when two police officers knocked on her door, telling her she'd been indicted for her brief but fateful involvement in a drug-trafficking operation years earlier. By the time she finally went to prison six years later, she was engaged, in her 30s and desperate to get her 15-month sentence over with. “The beginning of the sentence was the beginning of seeing the light at the end of the tunnel,” Kerman said this week, over a late lunch of heirloom tomatoes at the trendy New York City gastropub the Breslin -- a far cry from the iceberg lettuce and mystery meat she subsisted on while locked up at a federal prison in Danbury, Conn.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
As the fourth series in Netflix's attempt to change television and the world as we know it, "Orange Is the New Black" may feel a bit like the last bridesmaid, trailing in the petal-strewn wake of "House of Cards" and "Arrested Development. " But as any rom-com addict knows, it's precisely that gal, the one bringing up the rear with the broken heel and the tilted headdress, who winds up stealing the show. And so it may be with "Orange Is the New Black. " Jenji Kohan's fine and feisty adaptation of Piper Kerman's memoir, which chronicled Kerman's yearlong stint in federal prison, may not have the star power of "House of Cards.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
There's something to be said about being a walking billboard. Jenji Kohan, best known for being the creator of Showtime's "Weeds," fully embraces the task. Her nails - hands and toes - are coated in an orange hue. Her short hair is dizzied up with orange streaks. "I don't know how this Netflix promotion works," Kohan joked. "I'm just trying to spread the word anyway I can. " PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments The 43-year-old writer-producer is at the helm of Netflix's latest commission to roll out this year: "Orange Is the New Black.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Netflix's stock shot up 24% in after-hours trading Monday after the Internet film and TV delivery service said it had added 3 million new members, bringing its total number of global subscribers to more than 36 million. The high-profile original series, "House of Cards," which debuted Feb. 1, generated a halo effect for Netflix, producing enormous media and social-media buzz. Some investors worried that fans of actor Kevin Spacey or of the show's executive producer, David Fincher, who directed "The Social Network," would take advantage of a free trial offer from Netflix to watch the political thriller -- and then cancel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
"Orange is the New Black. " Jenji Kohan's serialized adaptation of Piper Kerman's memoir about doing time in a women's prison, proves that Netflix isn't just delivering original content in a unique way (i.e. a season at a time). It's also delivering unique content. Smart, funny and surprisingly moving, "Orange is the New Black" dares to suggest that the pretty, white, middle-class gal that television so loves to position as an Everywoman is nothing of the kind. As Piper Chapman, Taylor Shilling has all the high-maintenance, obliviously entitled tics down pat. Having finally gotten her life together -- the nice apartment, the devoted boyfriend, the artisanal soap business -- Piper is more than a little outraged that she is going to be punished for the youthful "indiscretion" of carrying drug money for an former drug-dealing girlfriend.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Showtime's upcoming eighth season of "Weeds" will be the last for the long-running comedy, a network spokesperson confirmed Wednesday. Created by Jenji Kohan and starring Mary-Louise Parker as a pot-dealing mom, "Weeds" was one the premium cable channel's eminent series when it made its debut in 2005 and has picked up numerous Emmy nominations during its tenure.   The Lionsgate-produced comedy averaged around 720,000 viewers last season, according to Nielsen. News of the series' end comes just days after the network announced it picked up two drama pilots -- Liev Schreiber's "Ray Donovan" and Michael Sheen's "Masters of Sex" -- as series.  Some cast and crew members have already lined up work: Justin Kirk (who plays Uncle Andy)
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