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Jennie Lechtenberg

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NEWS
September 1, 1991 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Against the backdrop of downtown skyscrapers, a caravan of trailers is rolling onto an empty lot in East Los Angeles. Surveying the scene, blueprints in hand, is Sister Jennie Lechtenberg, the enterprising nun who intends to make the flat patch of brown dirt the home of her new learning center. "You're given your lot in life, and you have to do something with it," she quips.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2003 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Jewish Home for the Aging's choice for its Community Mother of the Year honor is neither a mother nor Jewish. But Jennie Lechtenberg, a Roman Catholic nun, so impressed the group with her work as founder and director of the PUENTE Learning Center that it is honoring her today in Reseda at a Mother's Day gathering that is expected to attract more than 1,500 mothers, grandmothers and children.
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NEWS
June 11, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
Maria Martinez has worked most of her life in an East Los Angeles sweatshop, sewing ball gowns and wedding dresses for the more fortunate. Now, in her retirement years, Martinez is striving to realize a personal dream, to speak the language of the country in which she lives. "It is very difficult," she says haltingly. "Sometimes I understand nothing." Yet her face, etched with indeterminable age, is alight with happiness. "I try, I insist, because I want to talk English. I don't say no."
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Against the backdrop of downtown skyscrapers, a caravan of trailers is rolling onto an empty lot in East Los Angeles. Surveying the scene, blueprints in hand, is Sister Jennie Lechtenberg, the enterprising nun who intends to make the flat patch of brown dirt the home of her new learning center. "You're given your lot in life, and you have to do something with it," she quips.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2003 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Jewish Home for the Aging's choice for its Community Mother of the Year honor is neither a mother nor Jewish. But Jennie Lechtenberg, a Roman Catholic nun, so impressed the group with her work as founder and director of the PUENTE Learning Center that it is honoring her today in Reseda at a Mother's Day gathering that is expected to attract more than 1,500 mothers, grandmothers and children.
NEWS
May 1, 1994
The Salesian Boys and Girls Club will honor three people for their work in East Los Angeles neighborhoods at its Award of Excellence Dinner on May 12. Honoree Frank Villalobos is an architect who is active in Eastside issues and serves on the club's board of directors. Sister Jennie Lechtenberg founded People United to Enrich the Neighborhood Through Education (PUENTE), which provides job training, English as a Second Language classes and computer education for families in Boyle Heights.
NEWS
February 19, 1995
At PUENTE Learning Center, parents may attend new classes on child development and family growth held Fridays through June. The free parenting skills classes will teach practical information about nurturing the emotional and educational development of children. The curriculum includes topics such as holistic child development, educational opportunities, exposure to the arts and nutrition.
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
PUENTE Learning Center, which has offered free language and job-training classes to Eastside residents since 1985, will has scheduled a July 28 grand opening for its new center in South-Central. The new center, at 10000 Western Ave., is a former Arco station damaged in the 1992 riots and converted into classrooms. Arco awarded PUENTE a $1-million grant to buy the land, erect mobile classroom units and operate the program for about two years.
NEWS
August 28, 2013 | By Carla Hall
The death of Sister Sheila Walsh, believed to have been the first Roman Catholic nun in the nation to be a full-time registered lobbyist, reminded me of how many other activist nuns have contributed so forcefully and significantly to the causes of the poor (or, as Sister Sheila preferred, the less stigmatized “people living in poverty”), the homeless, the victims of warfare. Nuns dedicate their lives to service in the name of God, and that service can be -- and should be allowed to be -- more than pastoral.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1999 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Richard Riordan on Monday named seven Angelenos to a new board that will take on one of the city's toughest problems: getting residents involved in government. The Board of Neighborhood Empowerment, which was established by one of the City Charter reforms approved by voters June 8, will govern a new city department that will oversee a network of neighborhood councils throughout Los Angeles.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
Maria Martinez has worked most of her life in an East Los Angeles sweatshop, sewing ball gowns and wedding dresses for the more fortunate. Now, in her retirement years, Martinez is striving to realize a personal dream, to speak the language of the country in which she lives. "It is very difficult," she says haltingly. "Sometimes I understand nothing." Yet her face, etched with indeterminable age, is alight with happiness. "I try, I insist, because I want to talk English. I don't say no."
BUSINESS
September 30, 1992 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Computer giant IBM, joining an expanding group of corporations assisting the Rebuild L.A. task force, plans to announce today a five-year, $31-million aid package to help revitalize riot-ravaged inner-city areas of Los Angeles. For the most part, International Business Machines Corp. will donate computer equipment and services to local job training programs, learning centers, community agencies and the Rebuild L.A. task force itself, sources familiar with the program said Tuesday.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | ALICIA DI RADO, SPECIAL TO NUESTRO TIEMPO
Sister Jennie Lechtenberg watched a young man walk hurriedly past her, books under his arm. She tapped her watch and smiled as he slipped quietly into a newly painted portable classroom. "How often do you see students rushing to class like that at any other school?" the nun asked. "PUENTE students are here because they want to be here." The PUENTE Learning Center in Boyle Heights offers a variety of educational opportunities for children, adolescents and adults.
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