Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJennifer Frautschi
IN THE NEWS

Jennifer Frautschi

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2003 | Elaine Dutka
Violinist Jennifer Frautschi is still referred to as a "young artist," though she's turning 30 in June. The tag was applicable, she observes, when she performed solo at the Los Angeles Philharmonic's "High School Night" at age 16 -- and, to her amusement, it has stuck. Since then, the Pasadena native has parlayed her studies (at the Colburn School for the Performing Arts and the USC Thornton School of Music, for starters) into a thriving professional career. She and her 1722 Stradivarius violin have appeared with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, toured Belgium and Switzerland, drawn plaudits for a recording of Stravinsky and Ravel, and captured the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant -- previously awarded to Yo-Yo Ma and Joshua Bell.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2003 | Elaine Dutka
Violinist Jennifer Frautschi is still referred to as a "young artist," though she's turning 30 in June. The tag was applicable, she observes, when she performed solo at the Los Angeles Philharmonic's "High School Night" at age 16 -- and, to her amusement, it has stuck. Since then, the Pasadena native has parlayed her studies (at the Colburn School for the Performing Arts and the USC Thornton School of Music, for starters) into a thriving professional career. She and her 1722 Stradivarius violin have appeared with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, toured Belgium and Switzerland, drawn plaudits for a recording of Stravinsky and Ravel, and captured the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant -- previously awarded to Yo-Yo Ma and Joshua Bell.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2001 | JOHN HENKEN, John Henken is a frequent contributor to Calendar
In the violin world, this story is becoming a familiar one. A Los Angeles-area talent is nurtured at the Colburn School by master teacher Robert Lipsett, wins just about every prize and position open locally, then heads East for wider opportunity and validation. From this line--which includes Sheryl Staples, Leila Josefowicz and many others--comes Pasadena native Jennifer Frautschi.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2003 | Diane Haithman
New York violinist Jennifer Frautschi, raised in Pasadena, makes her subscription concerts debut as a soloist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic May 16 to 18, performing the Berg Violin Concerto with guest conductor Pierre Boulez. The L.A. performances represent a coming home of sorts for the 29-year-old musician.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2003 | Diane Haithman
New York violinist Jennifer Frautschi, raised in Pasadena, makes her subscription concerts debut as a soloist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic May 16 to 18, performing the Berg Violin Concerto with guest conductor Pierre Boulez. The L.A. performances represent a coming home of sorts for the 29-year-old musician.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2001 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For violinist Jennifer Frautschi, now in her 20s, Saturday night was definitely a multiple homecoming. Not only was she returning to her native Pasadena, she also was making a solo turn in front of the Pasadena Symphony, in whose ranks she played as a teenager (as did her older sister Laura) for three years. On the podium, as always, was Jorge Mester, Frautschi's mentor at the Pasadena Symphony and at the Aspen Music Festival.
NEWS
May 31, 1990
The United Teachers of Pasadena have named four students as recipients of $400 Memorial Scholarship Awards. They are Grace Huang, Blair High School; Linda Gibbs, Marshall Fundamental Secondary School; Jennifer Frautschi, Muir High School, and Heather Allen, Pasadena High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2001
The first event of a four-part series titled "Classical Conversations--Behind the Scenes With Jorge Mester and the Pasadena Symphony" will take place Friday at Vroman's Bookstore in Pasadena at 695 E. Colorado Blvd. The 4:30 p.m. event will feature Mester, the Pasadena Symphony's music director, along with violinist Jennifer Frautschi.
NEWS
June 14, 1990
Violinist Jennifer Shizuka Frautschi of Altadena has been named a 1990 Presidential Scholar in the Arts by the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts. Frautschi, a senior at Muir High School in Pasadena, will receive $3,000 from the foundation and $1,000 from the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. Frautschi, who will attend USC in the fall, has performed as a soloist with the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2000
Jorge Mester will conduct all eight concerts of the Pasadena Symphony's 2000-01 season, beginning Oct. 21, when 13-year-old Japanese violinist Mayuko Kamio makes her U.S. debut playing the Violin Concerto No. 5 by Vieuxtemps. Also on that program is Shostakovich's Symphony No. 4. Peter Schickele will attend the world premiere of his Cello Concerto, subtitled "In Memoriam F.D.R.," at the orchestra's Nov.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2001 | JOHN HENKEN, John Henken is a frequent contributor to Calendar
In the violin world, this story is becoming a familiar one. A Los Angeles-area talent is nurtured at the Colburn School by master teacher Robert Lipsett, wins just about every prize and position open locally, then heads East for wider opportunity and validation. From this line--which includes Sheryl Staples, Leila Josefowicz and many others--comes Pasadena native Jennifer Frautschi.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2001 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For violinist Jennifer Frautschi, now in her 20s, Saturday night was definitely a multiple homecoming. Not only was she returning to her native Pasadena, she also was making a solo turn in front of the Pasadena Symphony, in whose ranks she played as a teenager (as did her older sister Laura) for three years. On the podium, as always, was Jorge Mester, Frautschi's mentor at the Pasadena Symphony and at the Aspen Music Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1991 | KENNETH HERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite near-perfect beach weather Sunday afternoon, SummerFest's all-Baroque concert filled Sherwood Auditorium to capacity. The indoor musical diversions devised by festival artistic director Heiichiro Ohyama pleased the crowd, but the music-making set no records for polish or profundity. At fault were conductor Ohyama's larger-than-life interpretations of concertos by Vivaldi, Telemann and C.P.E. Bach.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|