Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJennifer Larmore
IN THE NEWS

Jennifer Larmore

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra concert at UCLA's Royce Hall Sunday night did not make sense. Mannequins in the lobby displayed gowns courtesy of Judy Lee Design. The evening was titled "Italian Inflections," but much of the music didn't fit. The evening's soloist, Jennifer Larmore, sounded like Jennifer Larmore, but she didn't look like the well-known American mezzo-soprano. Segues -- from silliness to sadness -- shocked. But music sometimes makes its own kind of sense.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra concert at UCLA's Royce Hall Sunday night did not make sense. Mannequins in the lobby displayed gowns courtesy of Judy Lee Design. The evening was titled "Italian Inflections," but much of the music didn't fit. The evening's soloist, Jennifer Larmore, sounded like Jennifer Larmore, but she didn't look like the well-known American mezzo-soprano. Segues -- from silliness to sadness -- shocked. But music sometimes makes its own kind of sense.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1996 | Lewis Segal, Lewis Segal is a Times staff writer
In a rehearsal room at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, the cast of Rossini's bel canto screwball comedy "L'italiana in Algeri" (The Italian Girl in Algiers) is learning how to be confused and stupefied in proper buffo style.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1998 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Mezzo-soprano Jennifer Larmore appears, allegro ma grazioso, at the door of a Dorothy Chandler Pavilion rehearsal room. She pauses at the threshold to apologize for some imagined tardiness ("Hope I haven't kept y'all waiting!") and alights delicately in a chair--offering proof that the diva's entrance isn't a lost art after all.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1996 | Martin Bernheimer
The masses are agog about the three tenors. But the aficionados are talking about the two mezzo-sopranos. First there was Cecilia Bartoli, everybody's Italian darling. Now there is Jennifer Larmore, 36, of Atlanta, who makes her Music Center Opera debut Jan. 17 in "L'Italiana in Algeri." Rossini's comedy hasn't been performed here since 1966, when it served as a vehicle for one of Larmore's idols: Marilyn Horne. Although Larmore's dark, wide-ranging, unusually flexible voice has been heard in most of Europe's great houses since 1986, her U.S. career is just beginning.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1996 | DANIEL CARIAGA
A recital is not a cabaret--it need not be motley and it must not be frenzied. Jennifer Larmore--media darling in the latest crop of low-voiced American divas--erred on the side of more-is-too-much at her West Coast debut recital Sunday afternoon at Veterans Wadsworth Theater in Westwood. What she sang best--florid, quick-note showpieces by Mozart and Handel--confirmed Larmore's place as royalty in the realm of roulades.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1998 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
With American mezzo-soprano Jennifer Larmore and tenor Placido Domingo in the leading roles, Bizet's "Carmen" will open L.A. Opera's 1998-99 season Sept. 8 in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion of the Music Center. Also in the eight-opera, 56-performance season, ending June 13, 1999, are two works new to the company's repertory, Massenet's "Werther" and a world premiere, American composer Tobias Picker's "Fantastic Mr. Fox."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1996 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The city that loves a star is agog with anticipation. On Thursday, Cecilia Bartoli, latest darling of the operatic universe, will finally make her debut at the Metropolitan Opera. There are certain ironies here. Bartoli is best-known and best-loved as a coloratura mezzo-soprano par excellence, and thus as a specialist in the florid, low-lying heroines of Rossini. Yet, for her introductory vehicle here, she has chosen the secondary chirping-soubrette duties of Despina in Mozart's "Cosi fan Tutte."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1997 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Carmen. Forget the music for a minute, and just think about who the character is and what she represents. She is one of the great figures in drama, a great icon of the modern world and a great woman around whom we love to spin fantasies and theories. Men love, and always have loved, Carmen, because she is so seductive and so true to herself. And women, right up to today's new generation of feminist musicologists, love her for exactly the same reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD
The fine art of songwriting, in the art song tradition, has been a practice paid ambivalent attention in our century. San Francisco-based pianist and composer Heggie has taken it upon himself to delve into the venerable songwriting tradition, often referring, stylistically, to romantic 19th century models and hints of smarter Broadway musical thinking, and now has well more than 100 pieces to show for the effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
"Carmen" is one of the best known, if not the best known, of all operas. It is so well known that it is even possible to be familiar with the story and not the opera; the gypsy seductress has been the subject of movies from the silent era to the present, movies in which she has been everything from vamp to lesbian. Bizet's tunes, too, are so famous that it is also easy to know the music and not the opera; even Bart and Homer Simpson have done their parody of the "Toreador Song."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1998 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Mezzo-soprano Jennifer Larmore appears, allegro ma grazioso, at the door of a Dorothy Chandler Pavilion rehearsal room. She pauses at the threshold to apologize for some imagined tardiness ("Hope I haven't kept y'all waiting!") and alights delicately in a chair--offering proof that the diva's entrance isn't a lost art after all.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1998 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
With American mezzo-soprano Jennifer Larmore and tenor Placido Domingo in the leading roles, Bizet's "Carmen" will open L.A. Opera's 1998-99 season Sept. 8 in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion of the Music Center. Also in the eight-opera, 56-performance season, ending June 13, 1999, are two works new to the company's repertory, Massenet's "Werther" and a world premiere, American composer Tobias Picker's "Fantastic Mr. Fox."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1997 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Carmen. Forget the music for a minute, and just think about who the character is and what she represents. She is one of the great figures in drama, a great icon of the modern world and a great woman around whom we love to spin fantasies and theories. Men love, and always have loved, Carmen, because she is so seductive and so true to herself. And women, right up to today's new generation of feminist musicologists, love her for exactly the same reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1996 | DANIEL CARIAGA
A recital is not a cabaret--it need not be motley and it must not be frenzied. Jennifer Larmore--media darling in the latest crop of low-voiced American divas--erred on the side of more-is-too-much at her West Coast debut recital Sunday afternoon at Veterans Wadsworth Theater in Westwood. What she sang best--florid, quick-note showpieces by Mozart and Handel--confirmed Larmore's place as royalty in the realm of roulades.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
"Carmen" is one of the best known, if not the best known, of all operas. It is so well known that it is even possible to be familiar with the story and not the opera; the gypsy seductress has been the subject of movies from the silent era to the present, movies in which she has been everything from vamp to lesbian. Bizet's tunes, too, are so famous that it is also easy to know the music and not the opera; even Bart and Homer Simpson have done their parody of the "Toreador Song."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD
The fine art of songwriting, in the art song tradition, has been a practice paid ambivalent attention in our century. San Francisco-based pianist and composer Heggie has taken it upon himself to delve into the venerable songwriting tradition, often referring, stylistically, to romantic 19th century models and hints of smarter Broadway musical thinking, and now has well more than 100 pieces to show for the effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1996 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
The city that loves a star is agog with anticipation. On Thursday, Cecilia Bartoli, latest darling of the operatic universe, will finally make her debut at the Metropolitan Opera. There are certain ironies here. Bartoli is best-known and best-loved as a coloratura mezzo-soprano par excellence, and thus as a specialist in the florid, low-lying heroines of Rossini. Yet, for her introductory vehicle here, she has chosen the secondary chirping-soubrette duties of Despina in Mozart's "Cosi fan Tutte."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1996 | Lewis Segal, Lewis Segal is a Times staff writer
In a rehearsal room at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, the cast of Rossini's bel canto screwball comedy "L'italiana in Algeri" (The Italian Girl in Algiers) is learning how to be confused and stupefied in proper buffo style.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|