Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJennifer Lawson
IN THE NEWS

Jennifer Lawson

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1989 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Jennifer Lawson, the new programming chief of the Public Broadcasting Service, said Friday that she aims "to rethink public television for a new generation of viewers" and provide programs that more accurately reflect the multicultural diversity of the country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2001 | JANICE RHOSHALLE LITTLEJOHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes motivation can come from the most unlikely places. For executive producer Jennifer Lawson, the driving impetus to undertake a documentary series on Africa for PBS was the result of hearing "Africa--what a country!" one too many times. "It's a continent," Lawson retorts, "not a country." The filmmaker was troubled by the notion that so many know so little of the second-largest continent and the land where civilization began.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1990 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I think I got this job because I'm comfortable being in the hot seat," said Jennifer Lawson, the Public Broadcasting Service's new senior programming executive. During a recent visit to Los Angeles, Lawson did seem comfortable in her newly created position as PBS' executive vice president for national programming and promotion services--despite the fact that this particular seat just became hotter than ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1990
Some readers may have found the article "Changing the Mix of PBS Programs" (by Sharon Bernstein, Aug. 17) unsettling, suggesting as it did that things are changing at PBS. Let me assure them that any change in public television will be evolutionary, rather than revolutionary. Even though public television is changing some of the ways it does business, certain things won't change. We will continue to be dedicated to public service. We will continue to provide information, education and cultural enrichment through our programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
Top executives at the Public Broadcasting Service on Tuesday entered the fray over the "indecency oath" that Congress has imposed on recipients of funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, saying that PBS would "fully support" any producer who refused to sign such an oath. "I would be very surprised if our producers would sign that," Neil Mahrer, PBS executive vice president and chief operating officer, told a news conference at the Century Plaza hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1990 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
Orange County public television station KOCE Channel 50 has long relied on providing its audience with a programming alternative to its bigger neighbor to the north, Los Angeles public station KCET. That strategy has included scheduling such popular programs as "Nova" and "Masterpiece Theater" at different times from KCET, and offering other programs not on the Los Angeles station's schedule--the British series "EastEnders," for example.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2001 | JANICE RHOSHALLE LITTLEJOHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes motivation can come from the most unlikely places. For executive producer Jennifer Lawson, the driving impetus to undertake a documentary series on Africa for PBS was the result of hearing "Africa--what a country!" one too many times. "It's a continent," Lawson retorts, "not a country." The filmmaker was troubled by the notion that so many know so little of the second-largest continent and the land where civilization began.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
When the Public Broadcasting Service trims its children's series "Wonderworks" to once a month instead of once a week this fall, the move will be more than just a routine cutback. The change, made at the behest of PBS programming chief Jennifer Lawson, signals a new era for public television, one in which a single executive controls decisions that were once made by a consortium of public stations and their officers, and in which Hollywood, prime time and ratings are no longer dirty words.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1990
Some readers may have found the article "Changing the Mix of PBS Programs" (by Sharon Bernstein, Aug. 17) unsettling, suggesting as it did that things are changing at PBS. Let me assure them that any change in public television will be evolutionary, rather than revolutionary. Even though public television is changing some of the ways it does business, certain things won't change. We will continue to be dedicated to public service. We will continue to provide information, education and cultural enrichment through our programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1990 | RICK VANDERKNYFF
Orange County public television station KOCE Channel 50 has long relied on providing its audience with a programming alternative to its bigger neighbor to the north, Los Angeles public station KCET. That strategy has included scheduling such popular programs as "Nova" and "Masterpiece Theater" at different times from KCET, and offering other programs not on the Los Angeles station's schedule--the British series "EastEnders," for example.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
When the Public Broadcasting Service trims its children's series "Wonderworks" to once a month instead of once a week this fall, the move will be more than just a routine cutback. The change, made at the behest of PBS programming chief Jennifer Lawson, signals a new era for public television, one in which a single executive controls decisions that were once made by a consortium of public stations and their officers, and in which Hollywood, prime time and ratings are no longer dirty words.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
Top executives at the Public Broadcasting Service on Tuesday entered the fray over the "indecency oath" that Congress has imposed on recipients of funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, saying that PBS would "fully support" any producer who refused to sign such an oath. "I would be very surprised if our producers would sign that," Neil Mahrer, PBS executive vice president and chief operating officer, told a news conference at the Century Plaza hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1990 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I think I got this job because I'm comfortable being in the hot seat," said Jennifer Lawson, the Public Broadcasting Service's new senior programming executive. During a recent visit to Los Angeles, Lawson did seem comfortable in her newly created position as PBS' executive vice president for national programming and promotion services--despite the fact that this particular seat just became hotter than ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1989 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
Jennifer Lawson, the new programming chief of the Public Broadcasting Service, said Friday that she aims "to rethink public television for a new generation of viewers" and provide programs that more accurately reflect the multicultural diversity of the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Public television plans to cover the next election the old-fashioned way: by making candidates speak without interruption from spin doctors, commercials or even posturing reporters. Alvin Perlmutter, head of the 1992 public television election project, said that he hopes to provide free air time to presidential candidates during the 1992 race, a concept long discussed in political circles but never dared on television.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1993
PBS Executive Vice President Jennifer Lawson's explanation for why PBS is unwilling to broadcast our Oscar-winning documentary "Deadly Deception--General Electric, Nuclear Weapons, and Our Environment," is a perfect illustration of PBS' narrow vision of its mandate as a public network ("It's Unfair to Say PBS Choices Are Timid," Feb. 15). Lawson states that the film's "artistic merit . . . persuasiveness or impact" is "not an issue" but says it "does not hold up against guidelines designed to ensure it is an objective, accurate and fair piece of journalism."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|