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Jennifer Siegal

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MAGAZINE
June 12, 2005 | Eryn Brown, Eryn Brown's last piece for the magazine was about traditionalist Catholic churches.
Jennifer Siegal's stomach is grumbling, which is causing audio problems for a TV crew that has invaded her sunny Venice office. "We've got an anomaly!" the sound guy shouts. Siegal, a 39-year-old designer, has already been answering a producer's questions for an hour. She sits in a vintage Steelcase desk chair and fiddles impatiently with her mike. "TV is incredibly weird," she says. She should know.
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MAGAZINE
June 12, 2005 | Eryn Brown, Eryn Brown's last piece for the magazine was about traditionalist Catholic churches.
Jennifer Siegal's stomach is grumbling, which is causing audio problems for a TV crew that has invaded her sunny Venice office. "We've got an anomaly!" the sound guy shouts. Siegal, a 39-year-old designer, has already been answering a producer's questions for an hour. She sits in a vintage Steelcase desk chair and fiddles impatiently with her mike. "TV is incredibly weird," she says. She should know.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1999
Woodbury University students won an honorable mention from the American Institute of Architects Los Angeles at the institute's 1998 Design Awards Program. The winning entry, a mobile eco-laboratory, competed with more than 125 projects by Los Angeles architects and is the first student project to win such an award. The cargo-trailer-turned-classroom also garnered an award from the Assn.
MAGAZINE
July 10, 2005
How crazy-making to read Dan Neil's column "Feels Like End Times" (800 Words, June 12), noting Elizabeth Kolbert's excellent and frightening series in the New Yorker on climate change, the Bush administration's dismantling of environmental regulations and the "Collapse?" exhibit at the Natural History Museum, juxtaposed with the piece about "visionary Venice designer" Jennifer Siegal, who wants to build environmentally friendly prefab houses ("Unsustainable?" by Eryn Brown, June 12). The problem is a government that puts roadblocks in front of Siegal and her buyers with regulations that have no flexibility for environmental innovation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1999 | JULIE HA
Competing against projects by some of the biggest-name architects in Los Angeles, an environmentally conscious--and consciousness-raising--trailer designed by Woodbury University students recently captured a prestigious architectural award. The Mobile Eco Laboratory received an Honorable Mention from the American Institute of Architects, Los Angeles chapter, making it the first student effort to be recognized in this competition for Los Angeles architects.
HOME & GARDEN
March 13, 2008 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
ALLISON ARIEFF wrote the book "Prefab" in 2002, chronicling the history of prefabricated houses and mapping the possible future of environmentally responsible modular home design and fabrication. "When I told people what I was doing, they giggled," says Arieff, one of the founders of Dwell and formerly the magazine's editor. "Like, why would anybody write a book on this really mundane ugly architecture?" Since then, the laughable increasingly has become laudable.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2010 | By CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE, Architecture Critic
Before we turn to an assessment of Aqua, a new residential skyscraper in Chicago, permit me a quick (and relevant!) detour to a sidewalk news conference in Lower Manhattan, held recently at the foot of the under-construction Beekman Tower. We join the event, held to celebrate the completion of its 76-floor steel frame, just as developer Bruce Ratner is ceding the podium to Frank Gehry, the Beekman's 80-year-old architect. Gehry pauses for effect. He looks out at the assembled crowd.
MAGAZINE
December 9, 2007 | Christopher Hawthorne, Christopher Hawthorne is the architecture critic of The Times. Contact him at christopher.hawthorne@latimes.com.
Up earlier than usual on a recent Sunday, I made a pot of coffee and opened The Times' Real Estate section, where a barrage of rather desperate-sounding come-ons caught my attention. Real estate pages have more exclamation points these days than a Tom Wolfe essay. Reduced! Foreclosure! Back on the Market! New Price! I circled half a dozen listings; plugging their addresses into Google Maps, I charted an itinerary across the city, from Hollywood to the beach and back east again.
HOME & GARDEN
September 21, 2006 | Lisa Boone
AH, modern living: handsome. Environmentally friendly. Delivered, move-in ready. Prefab enthusiasts can witness the possibilities as Marmol Radziner Prefab hosts a tour of the company's new modular housing factory in Vernon on Sunday. Potential customers can get an inside look into the production of the Utah House 1, which will be prefabricated entirely in the factory and transported for site installation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2007 | CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE
Was 2007 a mediocre year for new buildings? A nascent consensus in certain parts of the architecture world says so, and it's not hard to understand why: With the exception of Steven Holl's extension to the Nelson-Atkins Museum in Kansas City, Mo., which opened to raves in the spring, no building by a prominent architect to debut this year escaped critical complaint or public ambivalence altogether.
HOME & GARDEN
November 15, 2007 | Jeff Spurrier, Special to The Times
IF Jennifer Siegal has her way, new homes won't be constructed anymore. They'll be installed. That's the philosophy behind her recently completed Venice SwellHouse, a 3,130-square-foot, two-story residence assembled out of prefabricated structural insulated panels, or SIPs. The panels forming the walls, floors and ceilings were trucked in pre-cut, cored for wiring or plumbing, and numbered -- ready to be snapped together and attached to the steel frame.
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