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Jennifer Tipton

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2010 | By Charlotte Stoudt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Lighting designer Jennifer Tipton met Sardono W. Kusumo, an Indonesian dancer and choreographer, in 2008 at a workshop she was giving in Java. Tipton, one of this country's preeminent designers, had participants reverse their usual roles: Lighting designers made dance pieces; choreographers lighted them. Returning to Jakarta later that year, Tipton discovered a different kind of artistic shift. Sardono, known for his intense physical style, had begun painting. He was producing massive canvases, up to 30 feet high.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2010 | By Charlotte Stoudt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Lighting designer Jennifer Tipton met Sardono W. Kusumo, an Indonesian dancer and choreographer, in 2008 at a workshop she was giving in Java. Tipton, one of this country's preeminent designers, had participants reverse their usual roles: Lighting designers made dance pieces; choreographers lighted them. Returning to Jakarta later that year, Tipton discovered a different kind of artistic shift. Sardono, known for his intense physical style, had begun painting. He was producing massive canvases, up to 30 feet high.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2004 | Susan Reiter, Special to The Times
The earliest hints that a new Paul Taylor dance is about to emerge occur when the master choreographer begins a private dialogue with his choice of music. After this extended period of careful listening, the piece takes shape during an intensive rehearsal process with Taylor's company of 16 dancers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2004 | Susan Reiter, Special to The Times
The earliest hints that a new Paul Taylor dance is about to emerge occur when the master choreographer begins a private dialogue with his choice of music. After this extended period of careful listening, the piece takes shape during an intensive rehearsal process with Taylor's company of 16 dancers.
NEWS
June 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
"Jerome Robbins' Broadway," a collection of dazzling dance numbers from some of the famed choreographer's biggest hits, won the Tony Award on Sunday as best musical of the 1988-89 Broadway season. The show, which features excerpts from "West Side Story," "Fiddler on the Roof," "Gypsy" and other Robbins musicals, took a total of six Tonys, including one for Robbins as director of the musical. "The Heidi Chronicles," Wendy Wasserstein's comedy about one woman's 20-year journey to self-fulfillment, was named best play.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1985 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Far from a major repertory acquisition, the Joffrey Ballet revival of John Cranko's "Jeu de Cartes" (music by Stravinsky) might well be written off as just another relentlessly cute costume-ballet used to end an evening in a mood of mindless cheer--the "Cakewalk" of the current season. But that conclusion would ignore David Palmer's sizzling performance as the Joker, Friday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2014 | By Lewis Segal
Paul Taylor served the first generation of modern dance pioneers as a performer, then helped create and redefine the second as a choreographer. Other societies would long ago have named him a Living National Treasure. Here, at 83, he continues to assert his power to delight, amuse and possibly even anger audiences with programs such as the varied and challenging one his company danced on Friday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.   In the first of three performances, his 16-member ensemble offered a familiar Taylor parley: something bright and beautiful ("Airs," from 1978)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2007 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
At 52 and counting, the Paul Taylor Dance Company still has plenty to say. So does its eponymous founder and choreographer, which is why it's always a pleasure to welcome the acclaimed New York troupe to the Southland. Offering a broad sampling of Taylor classics and a trio of Southern California premieres over two nights, the 16 dancers displayed some serious gifts on the second of those Saturday -- all the better to showcase their guru's finely crafted, equally bravura works.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1990 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC/DANCE CRITIC
Having twice awakened its fascinating though hardly fantastic "Sleeping Beauty" at the Civic Theater, the San Francisco Ballet turned to mixed-repertory business last weekend. It wasn't business as usual. The centerpiece on the triple bill, warmly applauded by a surprisingly small audience on Saturday night, turned out to be a company premiere: Glen Tetley's "Tagore."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1986 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music/Dance Critic
Sir Frederick Ashton, that most urbane and elegant of British choreographers, turned 82 on Wednesday. The Joffrey Ballet, which had opened its West Coast season last week with a new production of his adorable "Fille mal Gardee," celebrated the occasion Tuesday night at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion with a birthday bouquet for, and by, the master.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1987 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Fewer than 700 people actually paid to see American Ballet Theatre on Thursday. That wouldn't even be a full house at the intimate Japan American Theatre; in cavernous Shrine Auditorium (which seats 6,226) it is a rank embarrassment. Of course, the company is arguably reaping what it sows: The advertising for the season emphasizes only full-evening story ballets and mostly relegates the midweek mixed bills to mere listings. Find them if you can.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1996 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Twyla Tharp has some catching up to do. Even before she disbanded her modern dance company in 1988, her absorption with ballet had distorted its repertory and style, while her independent projects ever since have seemed curiously backdated and self-obsessed, irrelevant to the darkening landscape of American modernism. "Tharp!
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