Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJennifer Trynin
IN THE NEWS

Jennifer Trynin

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1995 | Chris Willman and Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) , four stars (excellent). and
Imagine a cross between soft-shelled Marti Jones and hard-case Liz Phair and you're getting fairly close to Trynin, who with this preternaturally accomplished debut (an indie effort just re-released by a major) has made an unassumingly great little rock 'n' roll album. The real lineage of unannounced smarts and empathetic sass here is Chrissie Hynde's.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1995
Jennifer Trynin is undoubtedly a talent ("Go Ahead, Make Her Day," by Elysa Gardner, Aug. 20). But her scoffing at comparisons to Chrissie Hynde and other female rockers (while she embraces those who compare her to Keith Richards) reeks of its own brand of sexism. And what about her statement "I have no interest in autobiographical blah"? Doesn't she know that all art reveals something of the artist? And since the human experience is universal, all art is in some ways derivative? Trynin might take a lesson from Jerry Garcia.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1995 | Elysa Gardner, Elysa Gardner is a free-lance writer based in New York
If Jennifer Trynin becomes a rock star, her story could make a charming movie. The plot: A nice Jewish girl from New Jersey graduates from college with degrees in creative writing and philosophy and moves to Boston. Following the advice of a grandmother named Sadie, she pursues a career in journalism. Her heart is still in music, though, so she soon finds herself leading a double life, doing free-lance ghostwriting and editing by day, then performing songs she's written herself at nightclubs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1995 | Elysa Gardner, Elysa Gardner is a free-lance writer based in New York
If Jennifer Trynin becomes a rock star, her story could make a charming movie. The plot: A nice Jewish girl from New Jersey graduates from college with degrees in creative writing and philosophy and moves to Boston. Following the advice of a grandmother named Sadie, she pursues a career in journalism. Her heart is still in music, though, so she soon finds herself leading a double life, doing free-lance ghostwriting and editing by day, then performing songs she's written herself at nightclubs.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1995
Jennifer Trynin is undoubtedly a talent ("Go Ahead, Make Her Day," by Elysa Gardner, Aug. 20). But her scoffing at comparisons to Chrissie Hynde and other female rockers (while she embraces those who compare her to Keith Richards) reeks of its own brand of sexism. And what about her statement "I have no interest in autobiographical blah"? Doesn't she know that all art reveals something of the artist? And since the human experience is universal, all art is in some ways derivative? Trynin might take a lesson from Jerry Garcia.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1995 | Steve Hochman
You can cross Jennifer Trynin off the top of the record industry's "we gotta have 'em" wish list. The Boston-based singer-songwriter just signed with Warner Bros. Records after being pursued by everyone in the industry with an expense account and pen. That puts the focus squarely on another Boston-based performer: Mary Lou Lord.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1995 | RICHARD CROMELIN
If you didn't know it going into Jennifer Trynin's show at the Troubadour on Tuesday, you could probably guess by the end that she has spent a lot more time writing, recording and playing alone than she has performing with a band. The Boston-based musician's self-released album "Cockamamie" led to a contract with Warner Bros., which has just reissued the 1994 collection of lyrically smart, musically sharp songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1995 | LORRAINE ALI
What were the three most important things about KROQ's benefit Karma concert Saturday night at Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre? The admission price (free), the social scene (plenty of concession booths and beer) and, oh yeah, the bands (Jennifer Trynin, the Goo Goo Dolls, Filter and Candlebox). The mostly teen- and college-aged crowd spent much of its time trolling the expansive grounds while a lineup of supposedly alternative bands played to a half-filled house.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1995 | LORRAINE ALI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What were the three most-important things about KROQ's benefitKarma concert Saturday night at Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre? The admission price (free), the social scene (plenty of concession booths and beer) and, oh yeah, the bands (Jennifer Trynin, the Goo Goo Dolls, Filter and Candlebox).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1995 | Chris Willman and Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) , four stars (excellent). and
Imagine a cross between soft-shelled Marti Jones and hard-case Liz Phair and you're getting fairly close to Trynin, who with this preternaturally accomplished debut (an indie effort just re-released by a major) has made an unassumingly great little rock 'n' roll album. The real lineage of unannounced smarts and empathetic sass here is Chrissie Hynde's.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|