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Jenny Beth Martin

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NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Newt Gingrich emerged the winner in a Sunday night straw poll of tea party voters after he and three other Republican presidential candidates courted more than 23,000 activists during a tele-forum sponsored by the Tea Party Patriots coalition. Gingrich won with 31% of the vote. Second place went to Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann, who won 28%. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney won 20%, and former Sen. Rick Santorum won 16%. All four participated in a pre-poll call with activists, in which they each spent 10 minutes responding to questions from participants and gave a 90-second closing pitch for support.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Finally, a small cadre of busybody bureaucrats has discovered a way to bring this divided country together. Thank you, IRS, for pulling off what no politician has been able to do. Mortal political enemies on both sides of the aisle agree: The IRS badly misstepped when it singled out for scrutiny groups with the words “tea party” and “patriots” in their names who had applied for tax-exempt status. That is a Nixon-worthy no-no. Regardless of whether this practice simply represented a shortcut in the agency's larger effort to evaluate the flood of applications for tax-exempt status in 2010 and 2011, as the agency maintains, it's a ham-fisted way of doing business.
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NEWS
March 31, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro and Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
Budget talks continued Thursday on a compromise that would avoid a federal government shutdown, even as "tea party" protesters gathered outside the Capitol, urging Republicans not to stray from the $61 billion in cuts already approved by the House. A tentative deal would result in cuts of about half that -- $33 billion in cutbacks in one of the largest onetime reductions in domestic government programs. But House Speaker John Boehner insisted Thursday that Republicans had not agreed to that level of reductions.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Melanie Mason and Michael A. Memoli, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Tim Scott, a freshman tea party Republican, will become South Carolina's first black senator, Gov. Nikki Haley, announced Monday, appointing the congressman to fill the seat left vacant by Jim DeMint. "It is a great day for South Carolina," Haley said, speaking at the statehouse in Columbia. "It is a historic day for South Carolina. " Haley was joined by Scott and DeMint, as well as the state's senior senator, Lindsey Graham, and members of its congressional delegation.
NEWS
August 31, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Rep. Allen West, the only Republican member of the Congressional Black Caucus, threatened Wednesday to quit the group over what he called “racially motivated rhetoric” by fellow caucus members aimed at the tea party. At a recent Congressional Black Caucus event in Miami, Rep. Andre Carson, a Democrat from Indiana,  was videotaped telling the audience that, “some of them in Congress right now of this tea party movement would love to see you and me…hanging on a tree.” West, a Republican representing South Florida - who is known to use inflammatory language of his own - took issue with that comment and with remarks made by Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Finally, a small cadre of busybody bureaucrats has discovered a way to bring this divided country together. Thank you, IRS, for pulling off what no politician has been able to do. Mortal political enemies on both sides of the aisle agree: The IRS badly misstepped when it singled out for scrutiny groups with the words “tea party” and “patriots” in their names who had applied for tax-exempt status. That is a Nixon-worthy no-no. Regardless of whether this practice simply represented a shortcut in the agency's larger effort to evaluate the flood of applications for tax-exempt status in 2010 and 2011, as the agency maintains, it's a ham-fisted way of doing business.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
In any other non-election year, a freshman congressman might have found safe haven on the sidelines of a Little League game during the political doldrums of late July. Fat chance today. With the economy teetering and the government facing a potentially calamitous default, Rep. Frank Guinta (R-N.H.) is talking shop nearly everywhere he goes — and that includes a recent game between teams sponsored by Wieczorek Insurance and Jerome's Deli in Manchester. "Parents of kids will come and say, 'Congressman, I know you're here with your kids.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2010 | By Mark Z. Barabak and Kathleen Hennessey, Los Angeles Times
The political center, where swing voters reside and compromise happens, is suddenly a much smaller part of the Washington landscape. There were the usual kind words and olive branches extended on Wednesday. But nothing could hide the fact that the two parties have deep and abiding differences on nearly every issue facing Congress. The composition of the House and Senate may have changed, but not Washington: The place may be more polarized than ever. That could make it exceedingly difficult to accomplish anything of great magnitude between now and the next presidential election in November 2012.
NEWS
October 11, 2011 | By James Oliphant
As the Occupy Wall Street movement continues to spread - with massive arrests Monday night in Boston - the tea party wants you to know that the progressive protests have nothing in common with its own grass-roots effort. First, the arrests: About 100 people were arrested by police Monday evening in Boston, according to local news affiliates, after they refused to leave an off-limits area outside of the Dewey Square section of the city. Local representatives of the intentionally disorganized movement said the police overreacted.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Melanie Mason and Michael A. Memoli, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Tim Scott, a freshman tea party Republican, will become South Carolina's first black senator, Gov. Nikki Haley, announced Monday, appointing the congressman to fill the seat left vacant by Jim DeMint. "It is a great day for South Carolina," Haley said, speaking at the statehouse in Columbia. "It is a historic day for South Carolina. " Haley was joined by Scott and DeMint, as well as the state's senior senator, Lindsey Graham, and members of its congressional delegation.
NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Newt Gingrich emerged the winner in a Sunday night straw poll of tea party voters after he and three other Republican presidential candidates courted more than 23,000 activists during a tele-forum sponsored by the Tea Party Patriots coalition. Gingrich won with 31% of the vote. Second place went to Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann, who won 28%. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney won 20%, and former Sen. Rick Santorum won 16%. All four participated in a pre-poll call with activists, in which they each spent 10 minutes responding to questions from participants and gave a 90-second closing pitch for support.
NEWS
October 11, 2011 | By James Oliphant
As the Occupy Wall Street movement continues to spread - with massive arrests Monday night in Boston - the tea party wants you to know that the progressive protests have nothing in common with its own grass-roots effort. First, the arrests: About 100 people were arrested by police Monday evening in Boston, according to local news affiliates, after they refused to leave an off-limits area outside of the Dewey Square section of the city. Local representatives of the intentionally disorganized movement said the police overreacted.
NEWS
August 31, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Rep. Allen West, the only Republican member of the Congressional Black Caucus, threatened Wednesday to quit the group over what he called “racially motivated rhetoric” by fellow caucus members aimed at the tea party. At a recent Congressional Black Caucus event in Miami, Rep. Andre Carson, a Democrat from Indiana,  was videotaped telling the audience that, “some of them in Congress right now of this tea party movement would love to see you and me…hanging on a tree.” West, a Republican representing South Florida - who is known to use inflammatory language of his own - took issue with that comment and with remarks made by Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.)
NATIONAL
July 25, 2011 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
In any other non-election year, a freshman congressman might have found safe haven on the sidelines of a Little League game during the political doldrums of late July. Fat chance today. With the economy teetering and the government facing a potentially calamitous default, Rep. Frank Guinta (R-N.H.) is talking shop nearly everywhere he goes — and that includes a recent game between teams sponsored by Wieczorek Insurance and Jerome's Deli in Manchester. "Parents of kids will come and say, 'Congressman, I know you're here with your kids.
NEWS
March 31, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro and Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
Budget talks continued Thursday on a compromise that would avoid a federal government shutdown, even as "tea party" protesters gathered outside the Capitol, urging Republicans not to stray from the $61 billion in cuts already approved by the House. A tentative deal would result in cuts of about half that -- $33 billion in cutbacks in one of the largest onetime reductions in domestic government programs. But House Speaker John Boehner insisted Thursday that Republicans had not agreed to that level of reductions.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2010 | By Mark Z. Barabak and Kathleen Hennessey, Los Angeles Times
The political center, where swing voters reside and compromise happens, is suddenly a much smaller part of the Washington landscape. There were the usual kind words and olive branches extended on Wednesday. But nothing could hide the fact that the two parties have deep and abiding differences on nearly every issue facing Congress. The composition of the House and Senate may have changed, but not Washington: The place may be more polarized than ever. That could make it exceedingly difficult to accomplish anything of great magnitude between now and the next presidential election in November 2012.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
Mitt Romney's loss to President Obama on Tuesday unleashed predictable angst and debate in a Republican Party that must now decide how to attract a more diverse electorate. But for conservatives who identify with the tea party, one emotion seemed to dominate all others: a white-hot anger at the Republican establishment. Tea party supporters are angry at the GOP for embracing as its presidential nominee a "moderate" like Romney. For undermining "true conservative" candidates. And for "choosing to ignore" the conservative agenda.
NEWS
February 27, 2011 | By Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times
It always helps to show up. Republican Herman Cain, a former chief executive of Godfather Pizza and the only declared candidate of either party for the 2012 presidential election, won a straw poll Sunday among "tea-party" supporters at a weekend policy summit in Phoenix. Cain was one of the weekend's most popular speakers. Two other presumed candidates who showed up -- U.S. Rep. Ron Paul, and former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty -- placed second and third. But the event's sponsor, Tea Party Patriots, also released separate results for online voting.
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