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Jenny Johnson Jordan

SPORTS
July 24, 2000
San Juan Capistrano's Adam Jewell and Newport Beach's Nick Hannemann advanced to their first Assn. of Volleyball Professionals tournament final Sunday in Belmar, N.J., but they lost there to Canyon Ceman and Mike Whitmarsh, 15-11. Ceman and Whitmarsh also beat Jewell and Hannemann in the winner's bracket final, 15-9.
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SPORTS
June 14, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
The pro beach volleyball trend that started in Manhattan Beach continued Sunday, with the top men's and women's teams repeating their titles of a week before. Karch Kiraly and Mike Lambert took the men's championship, and Holly McPeak and Elaine Youngs grabbed the women's crown in the AVP Nissan Series San Diego Open.
SPORTS
May 29, 2004 | Peter Yoon
The AVP tour, minus several of its top teams, stops in Huntington Beach beginning today to kick off a three-week stay in Southern California. But unlike in 2000, when teams that missed AVP tournaments were suspended and fined, the teams missing events this year -- all playing overseas in Olympic qualifying tournaments -- will not be penalized. "We will support any players who desire the right to compete for an Olympic spot," AVP Commissioner Leonard Armato said.
SPORTS
July 17, 2000 | From Staff and News Services
Misty May and Holly McPeak won their third consecutive tournament title, defeating Tania Gooley and Pauline Manser of Australia, 7-12, 12-2, 12-8, in the final of the FIVB's $150,000 German Open women's beach volleyball tournament Sunday in Berlin. May, formerly of Newport Harbor High and Long Beach State, played with a stomach muscle injury, but she and McPeak still won the final in 1 hour 46 minutes to claim the $26,000 first prize.
SPORTS
May 3, 2008 | Dan Arritt, Times Staff Writer
Other than flying a kite, few outdoor activities seem enjoyable once the late-afternoon winds kick up along the Huntington Beach shoreline. Nick Lucena and Sean Scott weren't complaining, however. They took advantage of the unpredictable gusts to post one of the bigger upsets Friday afternoon on the opening day of the Huntington Beach Open beach volleyball tournament. The seventh-seeded pair rallied to defeat second-seeded Matt Fuerbringer and Casey Jennings, 18-21, 21-13, 15-9, to advance to this morning's winner's bracket semifinal against third-seeded John Hyden and Brad Keenan.
SPORTS
July 16, 2000
Second-seeded Misty May and Holly McPeak won two matches Saturday at the FIVB's German Open in Berlin, including a 15-11 victory over third-seeded Annett Davis and Jenny Johnson Jordan, to reach the semifinals and improve their U.S. Olympic standing. Because Liz Masakayan and Elaine Youngs, from El Toro High, finished 17th after winning only one of three matches Friday, May, from Newport Harbor High, and McPeak moved into second place in the U.S.
SPORTS
May 22, 2000 | MIKE BRESNAHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year from now, when Nancy Reno is sitting on the porch of her dream home in Colorado, she might reflect on what happened at the Santa Monica Open. The 12-year pro beach volleyball veteran, who said Sunday she will retire after this season, might even chuckle at the part she played at the second stop of the newly-created Beach Volleyball America women's tour. Then again, maybe not.
SPORTS
July 8, 2000
Katie and Tracy Lindquist, sisters who went to Ocean View High, teamed up and qualified for the main draw of the Seal Beach Women's Volleyball Open Friday. Katie, who attends the University of San Diego, and Tracy, who goes to USC, will play Danalee Bragado of Redondo Beach and Ali Wood of Long Beach today in the 24-team double-elimination tournament.
SPORTS
August 13, 2004 | Steve Springer, Times Staff Writer
For Misty May, that nagging abdominal strain just won't go away. Not the strain itself. That, she insists, is completely gone as she prepares to team with Kerri Walsh in the 2004 Olympic beach volleyball competition. It's fending off the constant media questions about the strain that has proved to be the bigger strain. "It can get annoying," May said, "but it was to be expected." That it was.
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