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Jenny Lewis

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January 20, 2006 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
Jenny Lewis, the singer for the Los Angeles band Rilo Kiley, has played just one hometown show before releasing her first solo album, and wouldn't you know, someone recorded the unannounced set at the Echo last summer and now her new songs are circulating on the Internet. So will her fans be tired of the music before it comes out on Tuesday?
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Is it time to admit that Rilo Kiley is never, ever getting back together? Sure seems that way. Nearly six years after the release of its last studio album, the L.A. band announced Monday that it's preparing a disc of rarities for release through bassist Pierre de Reeder's label, Little Record Co. "RKives," due April 2, will contain previously unreleased songs along with demos, B-sides and remixes, including a version of "Dejalo" that reportedly features...
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2008 | Ann Powers, Times Pop Music Critic
Jenny Lewis no longer calls Silver Lake home, but she hasn't moved to Laurel Canyon. The woodsy bungalow she shares with her companion and musical collaborator, Johnathan Rice, sits in an obscure corner of the San Fernando Valley, not too far from either of the neighborhoods favored by L.A.'s rock elite, but on its own ground. "I feel like this is an undiscovered area," said the 32-year-old singer-songwriter on a recent Friday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2010 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
Even though Jenny Lewis and Johnathan Rice are one of L.A. indie rock's most doe-eyed couples, their debut album together as Jenny & Johnny emerged from a breakup. They'd split with one of their favorite musicians — Bob Dylan. "We were at this jam session in Laurel Canyon with our friend, [singer] Farmer Dave Scher," Rice said. "We'd played like three Bob Dylan covers, and Dave put down his guitar and said, 'I just can't do this Dylan Fantasy Camp anymore.'" Lewis and Rice each built their solo careers around the sprawling, metaphor-heavy songwriting style that Dylan turned into shorthand for "serious folk artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2002 | Kevin Bronson
Neva Dinova "Neva Dinova" (Crank!) *** 1/2 Reaching the crest of the title track of "The Execution of All Things," Jenny Lewis of the Los Angeles band Rilo Kiley sings: "Then we'll go to Omaha, to work and exploit the booming music scene...." Whether her tone is earnestly hopeful or sweetly ironic, that's exactly what Rilo Kiley did, signing to indie label Saddle Creek and recording its engaging second album in Nebraska. Out of the same city and recording studio (but via an L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Is it time to admit that Rilo Kiley is never, ever getting back together? Sure seems that way. Nearly six years after the release of its last studio album, the L.A. band announced Monday that it's preparing a disc of rarities for release through bassist Pierre de Reeder's label, Little Record Co. "RKives," due April 2, will contain previously unreleased songs along with demos, B-sides and remixes, including a version of "Dejalo" that reportedly features...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2008 | Ann Powers, POP MUSIC CRITIC
Many music fans get serious about pop through a love affair with a club. Whether it was a legendary spot or just the dive down the street from the dorm, such a place provides more than just loud sound and overpriced beer. People get attached to the strangest things in clubs -- memorably awful bathrooms, decorously peeling wallpaper, a particular corner where the guitar feedback hits just right.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2010 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
Even though Jenny Lewis and Johnathan Rice are one of L.A. indie rock's most doe-eyed couples, their debut album together as Jenny & Johnny emerged from a breakup. They'd split with one of their favorite musicians — Bob Dylan. "We were at this jam session in Laurel Canyon with our friend, [singer] Farmer Dave Scher," Rice said. "We'd played like three Bob Dylan covers, and Dave put down his guitar and said, 'I just can't do this Dylan Fantasy Camp anymore.'" Lewis and Rice each built their solo careers around the sprawling, metaphor-heavy songwriting style that Dylan turned into shorthand for "serious folk artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2009 | August Brown
During his headlining set at KCRW's World Festival at the Hollywood Bowl on Sunday night, Maine-based singer-songwriter Ray LaMontagne used his yearning, raspy voice and barely there folk strumming to induce maximum snuggling among the assembled couples.
NEWS
February 10, 1991
Regarding the Jan. 21 (NBC) showing of "Line of Fire: The Morris Dees Story," I just want to say I loved it. Its vivid portrayal of one man's personal crusade against the United Klans of America was both an important and wonderfully performed one. The quality of his message is only surpassed by the fact that his plight was real. Another remarkable feat of Dees I found in this story was that he fought the supremacists while raising and bonding with his daughter, played beautifully by Jenny Lewis.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2009 | August Brown
During his headlining set at KCRW's World Festival at the Hollywood Bowl on Sunday night, Maine-based singer-songwriter Ray LaMontagne used his yearning, raspy voice and barely there folk strumming to induce maximum snuggling among the assembled couples.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2008 | Ann Powers, POP MUSIC CRITIC
Many music fans get serious about pop through a love affair with a club. Whether it was a legendary spot or just the dive down the street from the dorm, such a place provides more than just loud sound and overpriced beer. People get attached to the strangest things in clubs -- memorably awful bathrooms, decorously peeling wallpaper, a particular corner where the guitar feedback hits just right.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2008 | Ann Powers, Times Pop Music Critic
Jenny Lewis no longer calls Silver Lake home, but she hasn't moved to Laurel Canyon. The woodsy bungalow she shares with her companion and musical collaborator, Johnathan Rice, sits in an obscure corner of the San Fernando Valley, not too far from either of the neighborhoods favored by L.A.'s rock elite, but on its own ground. "I feel like this is an undiscovered area," said the 32-year-old singer-songwriter on a recent Friday afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2006 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
Jenny Lewis, the singer for the Los Angeles band Rilo Kiley, has played just one hometown show before releasing her first solo album, and wouldn't you know, someone recorded the unannounced set at the Echo last summer and now her new songs are circulating on the Internet. So will her fans be tired of the music before it comes out on Tuesday?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2002 | Kevin Bronson
Neva Dinova "Neva Dinova" (Crank!) *** 1/2 Reaching the crest of the title track of "The Execution of All Things," Jenny Lewis of the Los Angeles band Rilo Kiley sings: "Then we'll go to Omaha, to work and exploit the booming music scene...." Whether her tone is earnestly hopeful or sweetly ironic, that's exactly what Rilo Kiley did, signing to indie label Saddle Creek and recording its engaging second album in Nebraska. Out of the same city and recording studio (but via an L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012
FESTIVAL Moon Block Party with Fools Gold and more 500 block of 2nd St., Pomona 2 p.m.-midnight Sat. free. moonblockparty.org MUSIC Glen Campbell with Lucinda Williams, Jenny Lewis and more The Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., L.A. 7 p.m. Sun. $12-$136. hollywoodbowl.com DJ NIGHT Afrojack Playhouse, 6506 Hollywood Blvd., L.A. 10 p.m. Mon. $90. playhousenightclub.com BAR OPENING Bootsy Bellows 9229 W. Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood Opens Tuesday.
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | Lynne Heffley
This 1988 TV film is that rare pleasure--a family film of maturity and substance. Based on Doris Orgel's book "Devil in Vienna," Richard Alfieri's sensitive teleplay chronicles a friendship between two 13-year-old girls--one Jewish (Jenny Lewis), one Catholic (Kamie Harper)--that endures through Germany's annexation of Austria in 1938.
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