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Jenny Saville

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January 13, 2002 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP
Jenny Saville, 31, is one of Britain's young art superstars, applauded for her wall-sized paintings of monumentally nude women. Media accounts lend her career a fairy-tale simplicity. Born in Cambridge, England, the daughter of educators, she was discovered by influential art collector Charles Saatchi in 1992, shortly after she graduated from Glasgow School of Art. He commissioned her to paint an entire show for his London museum in 1994.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2002 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP
Jenny Saville, 31, is one of Britain's young art superstars, applauded for her wall-sized paintings of monumentally nude women. Media accounts lend her career a fairy-tale simplicity. Born in Cambridge, England, the daughter of educators, she was discovered by influential art collector Charles Saatchi in 1992, shortly after she graduated from Glasgow School of Art. He commissioned her to paint an entire show for his London museum in 1994.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic
WHO knows what artworks Eli Broad will lend to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art for the opening of the $50-million building he will erect there? No one, including Joanne Heyler, director and chief curator of the Broad Art Foundation. LACMA's new showplace, the Broad Contemporary Art Museum, isn't expected to open until late 2007, and plans for the inaugural exhibition are in development, Heyler says. But the list of contenders grew considerably in 2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2005 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
Fat. It's a "three-letter word larded with meaning," write the editors of the book "Fat." At a time when the subject of body image provokes widespread anxiety, insecurity and self-consciousness, especially about weight, 13 anthropologists and a self-described "fat activist" consider the word as a concept, a stigma, an aesthetic, an epidemic and even a status symbol in a collection of provocative and entertaining essays subtitled "The Anthropology of an Obsession."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | Christopher Miles, Special to The Times
"WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution," the Los Angeles exhibition surveying feminist art from the 1970s, might make Southern California seem the center of feminist art discourse right now. But the Brooklyn Museum's new Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art brings a major East Coast entry into the discussion, which by all evidence is global. Like those in "WACK!," its offerings are hit-and-miss but overall exciting.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legend has it that sometime around 1630, at a lavish banquet for England's King Charles I and Queen Henrietta Maria, the duke of Buckingham presented her majesty with an enormous pie, inside of which a dwarf was hidden. The queen was delighted. Little Jeffrey Hudson became her constant companion, until the fateful day in 1649 when he killed an adversary in a duel over slurs about his stature and was banished from the realm. Hudson was captured at sea by Turkish pirates and sold into slavery.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Despite posted warnings, none of the visitors to the Brooklyn Museum of Art seemed to be visibly shocked, nauseated, confused, panicked, euphoric or the least bit anxiety-ridden on the day I saw "Sensation: Young British Art From the Saatchi Collection." Mostly they were having quiet fun.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2003 | Christopher Miles, Special to The Times
The title of the 50th Venice Biennale, "Dreams and Conflicts: The Dictatorship of the Viewer," might have a political ring that echoes through much of the exhibition. But Biennale director Francesco Bonami insists the title refers to the aspirations and difficulties involved in an exhibition such as this, and to his desire to empower the audience in interpreting the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2005 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
After delivering a lecture at Yale a few years ago, art historian and critic Donald Kuspit strolled through the university's art studios, as is his habit when traveling, to see what students were up to. One encounter that day summed it up: "I went into the studio of a young woman and asked to see her work," he recalls. "She said: 'I have no work. I'll show you a tape of my professors criticizing me for not working. That's my work. They came to my studio and asked me why I wasn't doing anything.
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