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Jenny Spangler

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SPORTS
February 11, 1996 | From Associated Press
Jenny Spangler, unknown and overlooked by even her closest competitors, scored a shocking victory in the U.S. women's Olympic marathon trials Saturday. Sentimental favorite Joan Benoit Samuelson finished 13th. Joining the unheralded Spangler on the team that will compete against the world's best long-distance runners at the Atlanta Games were Linda Somers, the 1993 and 1994 U.S. marathon champion, and Anne Marie Lauck, who dedicated the race to her late mother. Spangler, 32, wearing bib No.
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SPORTS
February 11, 1996 | From Associated Press
Jenny Spangler, unknown and overlooked by even her closest competitors, scored a shocking victory in the U.S. women's Olympic marathon trials Saturday. Sentimental favorite Joan Benoit Samuelson finished 13th. Joining the unheralded Spangler on the team that will compete against the world's best long-distance runners at the Atlanta Games were Linda Somers, the 1993 and 1994 U.S. marathon champion, and Anne Marie Lauck, who dedicated the race to her late mother. Spangler, 32, wearing bib No.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1996
The Olympic Games are coming early to Santa Monica College, where more than 1,500 people are expected to spend this morning with current and former track and field athletes. The event is sponsored by One Voice, a nonprofit group that helps the needy. One Voice has invited more than 1,000 people from Head Start programs in South-Central Los Angeles to the event. Westside residents also are encouraged to participate, said Barbara Jacobs, event coordinator.
NEWS
July 29, 1996 | JULIE CART
The top American finisher in Sunday's women's marathon didn't look so good. Anne Marie Lauck of Marietta, Ga., finished 10th in 2 hours 31 minutes 30 seconds, crossed the line and then fell to her knees. She was scooped up by medical personnel on the track and carried off in dramatic fashion. It wasn't as bad as it looked though. Lauck had stomach and leg cramps and was chatting with reporters 10 minutes later. "I don't know about this marathon thing," she said, laughing.
SPORTS
July 10, 1996 | EARL GUSTKEY
Tennis star Pete Sampras was invited to play in the Isuzu Celebrity Golf Championship this weekend at Lake Tahoe. Sampras agreed, but set down two conditions: --NBC, which is televising the tournament, had to interview him about his favorite charity, the Tim Gullikson Foundation. --He had to be paired with his favorite NFL player, Dan Marino. Kind of cheeky for a guy who was eliminated in the Wimbledon quarterfinals.
SPORTS
February 26, 1996 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Approaching his 35th birthday and attempting to rebound from a disappointing year, Carl Lewis is no cinch to earn a berth on his fifth Olympic team this summer. But even if he is not in Atlanta as a competitor, he will be represented. Jenny Spangler, the surprise winner of the U.S.
SPORTS
March 27, 1996 | ALLAN MALAMUD
Fifteen years ago, former USC basketball coach Bob Boyd left Del Mar for Starkville, Miss. . . . "It was an easy decision," he recalls. "I was out of work and needed the money." . . . His Mississippi State Bulldogs never reached the postseason during his five-year tenure, but he helped hone the skills of Jeff Malone, won 17 games one season, made plenty of friends and enjoyed the experience. . . . "If you are a coach or a minister, you gain immediate acceptance in the Deep South," Boyd said.
SPORTS
April 20, 1997 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a long-running play that winds through eight sets of scenery, with its 101st performance carried out over 26 miles 385 yards of plots, subplots and intrigue, with occasional dashes of comedy and a fair amount of personal tragedy. Its story has many lines: * will Moses Tanui again lead his people and everyone else's to the Promised Land? * will Cosmas Ndeti go with God, or will he find out God has gone with somebody else? * will Dionicio Ceron establish a new world order?
SPORTS
July 5, 1996 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She was running south along Lakeshore Drive in Chicago on an autumn Sunday when she ran into the wall, invisible but every bit as real as that built by the Chinese to keep out the Vandals or the one in Boston built to keep baseballs in Fenway Park. It was the 20th mile of the 1994 Chicago Marathon, and tears welled in Jenny Spangler's eyes as she slowed to a walk, then stopped, sat down and quit. For about two minutes.
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